Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
657 Research products, page 1 of 66

  • Research data
  • Other research products
  • Wellcome Trust
  • English

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sparks, Hugh; Dr Hiroshi Kondo; Mr. Steven Hooper;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Tumour Cell Biology Labor... (FC001144)

    Cell lines IGROV-1 cell lines were cultured in CO2 dependent media with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% Pen Strep at 37 ˚C. Before experiments, cells were grown to 80% confluence. For measuring doxorubicin uptake by fluorescence an IGROV-1 cell line stably expressing GFP fused to Histone-1 (H1) was made using the PiggyBac transposon system. As a control to show that effect of doxorubicin on GFP depends on whether it is fused to H1 or not, a stable whole cell expression of GFP by lentiviral transfection and selection by Geneticin was made. For bioluminescence imaging of xenograft tumors, all IGROV-1 cell lines were made to stably express firefly luciferase. To investigate the effect of doxorubicin on other histones, IGROV-1 cells were transiently transfected with a Histone-2B-GFP plasmid (gift from Kurt Anderson) using the Lipofectamine® 2000 reagent. IGROV-1 cells were obtained from Crick institute cell services and confirmed as IGROV-1 by Short Tandem Repeats (STR) profiling and no mycoplasma was detected. In vitro experiments IGROV-1 cells were grown to 80% confluence in 75 ml flasks before being re-plated in 12 or 24 well plates or 35 ml glass bottomed dishes and allowed to attach to the surface for 24 hours before experiments. To study how the fluorescence of GFP labelled H1 labelled IGROV-1 cells changes with doxorubicin treatment, fluorescence intensity and lifetime distributions were measured from cells after 3 hours of incubation with doxorubicin of varying concentrations (0, 0.18, 0.9, 1.8, 9, 18 µM) by serial dilutions of a stock solution with PBS. After 3 of hours, cells were washed in PBS then fixed for 20 minutes in 4% PFA. Cells were then imaged in PBS. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (Sigma-Aldrich, D1515-10 mg) was dissolved in PBS to a concentration of 9 mM and stored at -20˚C. Cell lines IGROV-1 cell lines were cultured in CO2 dependent media with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% Pen Strep at 37 ˚C. Before experiments, cells were grown to 80% confluence. For measuring doxorubicin uptake by fluorescence an IGROV-1 cell line stably expressing GFP fused to Histone-1 (H1) was made using the PiggyBac transposon system. As a control to show that effect of doxorubicin on GFP depends on whether it is fused to H1 or not, a stable whole cell expression of GFP by lentiviral transfection and selection by Geneticin was made. For bioluminescence imaging of xenograft tumors, all IGROV-1 cell lines were made to stably express firefly luciferase. To investigate the effect of doxorubicin on other histones, IGROV-1 cells were transiently transfected with a Histone-2B-GFP plasmid (gift from Kurt Anderson) using the Lipofectamine® 2000 reagent. IGROV-1 cells were obtained from Crick institute cell services and confirmed as IGROV-1 by Short Tandem Repeats (STR) profiling and no mycoplasma was detected. In vitro experiments IGROV-1 cells were grown to 80% confluence in 75 ml flasks before being re-plated in 12 or 24 well plates or 35 ml glass bottomed dishes and allowed to attach to the surface for 24 hours before experiments. To study how the fluorescence of GFP labelled H1 labelled IGROV-1 cells changes with doxorubicin treatment, fluorescence intensity and lifetime distributions were measured from cells after 3 hours of incubation with doxorubicin of varying concentrations (0, 0.18, 0.9, 1.8, 9, 18 µM) by serial dilutions of a stock solution with PBS. After 3 of hours, cells were washed in PBS then fixed for 20 minutes in 4% PFA. Cells were then imaged in PBS. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (Sigma-Aldrich, D1515-10 mg) was dissolved in PBS to a concentration of 9 mM and stored at -20˚C.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Fujii, K.; Young, M.T.; Harris, K.D.M.;
    Publisher: Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre
    Project: WT

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures. Related Article: K.Fujii, M.T.Young, K.D.M.Harris|2011|J.Struct.Biol.|174|461|doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2011.03.001

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wathuo, Miriam; Medley, Graham; Nokes, D. James; Munywoki, Patrick K.;
    Publisher: F1000Research
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Defining pathways of resp... (102975), WT | Household transmission of... (090853)

    Background: A better understanding of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemiology requires realistic estimates of RSV shedding patterns, quantities shed, and identification of the related underlying factors.\ud \ud Methods: RSV infection data arise from a cohort study of 47 households with 493 occupants, in coastal Kenya, during the 2009/2010 RSV season. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken every 3 to 4 days and screened for RSV using a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The amount of virus shed was quantified by calculating the ‘area under the curve’ using the trapezoidal rule applied to rescaled PCR cycle threshold output. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify correlates of amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Results: The median quantity of virus shed per infection episode was 29.4 (95% CI: 15.2, 54.2) log10 ribonucleic acid (RNA) copies. Young age (<1 year), presence of upper respiratory symptoms, intra-household acquisition of infection, an individual’s first infection episode in the RSV season, and having a co-infection of RSV group A and B were associated with increased amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Conclusions: The findings provide insight into which groups of individuals have higher potential for transmission, information which may be useful in designing RSV prevention strategies.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dijk, E.M.S.; Dimitropoulos, Harry; Iatropoulou, Katerina; Foufoulas, Ioannis;
    Publisher: OpenAIRE2020
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: WT , EC | OpenAIRE2020 (643410)

    This deliverable relates to the work carried out under task T8.3, “Research Impact Services”. The task’s focus is on the development of pilots with selected National funding agencies and infrastructure initiatives in order to serve them with the OpenAIRE research impact suite of services. A major service that OpenAIRE provides is the linking of research results to funding. Aside from importing the links from the repositories and journals, OpenAIRE designs, develops and enhances mining algorithms that identify and extract funding information from the text of scientific publications. With the help of NOADs we have initiated bi-lateral, often informal, collaborations with national funding agencies to facilitate mining extraction on their data. This is an on-going activity throughout the duration of the project. Currently the national funding agencies that we are working with are: FCT (Portugal), ARC (Australia), NHMRC (Australia), NSF & NIH (USA), SFI (Ireland), “Ministry of Science Education and Sport” & "Croatian Science Foundation” (Croatia), NWO (Netherlands), and DFG (Germany). This deliverable describes the nature of the data of the identified National funding agencies, as well as their export technologies, and provides the specification of the general-purpose OpenAIRE services required to support research impact measurements.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Montgomery, Lucy;
    Publisher: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT

    The crisis in academic publishing raises fundamental questions about the nature of scholarly enquiry and highlights a lack of connection between the prized forms of scholarship and contemporary readers. Lucy Montgomery explains why partnering with an academic publisher could produce a revolutionary approach to making scholarly work available for free.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2007
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chataway, Jo; Chaturvedi, Kalpana; Hanlin, Rebecca; Mugwagwa, Julius; Smith, James; Wield, David;
    Publisher: ESRC Innogen Centre
    Project: WT

    Science, technology and innovation are vital to poverty alleviation and improved health. However, although improving immediate access to health care and existing health technologies is essential, simply importing technologies and products is not enough to create sustainable health care systems. Countries also need to build the capacities and institutions to develop their own technology and innovations which are tailored to local needs.\ud \ud But for innovation to meet local needs, countries need to develop dynamic and integrated health innovation systems. This is for several reasons. Firstly, there tends to be a profound lack of understanding between those in the world of healthcare and those who work in health innovation and production of pharmaceuticals. And unless researchers and producers network with local users and consumers, they are much less likely to respond to local needs.\ud \ud Secondly improved innovation capacity that responds to the needs of users does not occur in isolation - it is not the product of one-off scientific inventions, heavy investment in science or one-off policies. Rather it is dependent on networks through government institutions, private companies and a wide variety of end-user groupings at national, international and sectoral levels. Finally, knowledge is not accumulated and built up in one set of institutions and transferred to another set - it results instead from the interplay between different organisations and institutions.\ud \ud There is now an unparalleled opportunity to address both the issues of neglected diseases and to develop such integrated health innovation systems. Huge investments are currently being made in global health programmes which seek to improve health services and health innovation systems. The challenge for African policymakers is to adopt strategies for integrating global programmes with local and regional health innovation systems.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reis, Pedro;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Country: Portugal
    Project: WT

    The exercise of Environmental Citizenship is strongly associated with a citizen’s capacity to act in society as an agent of change (ENEC 2018), and this depends on the development of a person’s willingness and competence for a critical, active and democratic engagement in preventing and solving environmental problems. There is a call for a citizenry that is well informed and empowered to take appropriate actions on the seriousness of the environmental problems affecting our world (Gray et al. 2009; Hodson 2003). However, many citizens do not feel empowered enough to participate in decision-making processes regarding socio-environmental issues, and, at the same time, the faith and trust in politicians have decreased, and political apathy is gaining ground (Hodson 2014). Throughout the past decade, the surge in authoritarian government practices, the failure of popular movements to replace undemocratic regimes and the increase in populist movements all over the world are fuelling concerns about a possible ‘democratic recession’ (Diamond 2015). Part of the success of this movement has been credited to the failures in mobilising young people’s political participation (Schulz et al. 2018; Jackson et al. 2016). Civic engagement depends on students and their ‘motivation to participate in civic activities, their confidence in the effectiveness of their participation, and their beliefs about their own capacity to become actively involved’ (Schulz et al. 2018, p. 72). Research shows that a student’s civic engagement can be supported and encouraged by school, with the help of (1) open school climates, (2) democratic structures within schools and (3) early opportunities for active participation, the promotion of students’ civic knowledge and the predisposition to engage in civic activities in the future (Schulz et al. 2018; Pancer 2015; Roth and Barton 2004). Therefore, education represents a key element in counteracting low levels of civic engagement among young people, namely, through the promotion of democratic activism (Hodson 2014).

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tickner, Ben J.; Parker, Rachel R.; Whitwood, Adrian C.; Duckett, Simon B.;
    Publisher: Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre
    Project: WT

    Related Article: Ben J. Tickner, Rachel R. Parker, Adrian C. Whitwood, Simon B. Duckett|2019|Organometallics|38|4377|doi:10.1021/acs.organomet.9b00610

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dr. Hugh Sparks; Mr. Steven Hooper; Dr. Erik Sahai;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Tumour Cell Biology Labor... (FC001144)

    Murine xenografts were prepared by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of IGROV-1 cancer cells. IGROV-1 cells were grown to 80% confluence before being trypsinized and re‑suspended in PBS at a concentration of cells per ml. cells were injected into ICRF nude mice. After 14 days post-injection, the presence of intraperitoneal tumors was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging. Briefly, an IVIS bioluminescence imaging system was used to image isoflurane anesthetized mice. 100 µl of D-luciferin (luciferase substrate) at 30mg ml-1 was injected IP 10 minutes before recording of bioluminescence images. The presence of peritoneal tumors was confirmed if bioluminescence signals from the peritoneum were above background noise 10-30 minutes after D‑luciferin injections. Following confirmation of tumors, in vivo fluorescence imaging experiments were carried out after 21 days. To study differences in drug uptake between intravenous or intraperitoneal delivery, prior to imaging mice were subject to IP or IV doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for 1.5, 3 or 24 hours. Imaging involved terminal procedures, mice were anesthetized then peritoneal tumors were exposed by minor surgery and inspected with the CEM. All animal model procedures were approved by The Francis Crick Institute Biological Ethics Committee and UK Home Office authority provided by Project License 70/8380. Murine xenografts were prepared by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of IGROV-1 cancer cells. IGROV-1 cells were grown to 80% confluence before being trypsinized and re‑suspended in PBS at a concentration of cells per ml. cells were injected into ICRF nude mice. After 14 days post-injection, the presence of intraperitoneal tumors was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging. Briefly, an IVIS bioluminescence imaging system was used to image isoflurane anesthetized mice. 100 µl of D-luciferin (luciferase substrate) at 30mg ml-1 was injected IP 10 minutes before recording of bioluminescence images. The presence of peritoneal tumors was confirmed if bioluminescence signals from the peritoneum were above background noise 10-30 minutes after D‑luciferin injections. Following confirmation of tumors, in vivo fluorescence imaging experiments were carried out after 21 days. To study differences in drug uptake between intravenous or intraperitoneal delivery, prior to imaging mice were subject to IP or IV doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for 1.5, 3 or 24 hours. Imaging involved terminal procedures, mice were anesthetized then peritoneal tumors were exposed by minor surgery and inspected with the CEM. All animal model procedures were approved by The Francis Crick Institute Biological Ethics Committee and UK Home Office authority provided by Project License 70/8380.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reddy, Akhilesh B.;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Project: WT
Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
657 Research products, page 1 of 66
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sparks, Hugh; Dr Hiroshi Kondo; Mr. Steven Hooper;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Tumour Cell Biology Labor... (FC001144)

    Cell lines IGROV-1 cell lines were cultured in CO2 dependent media with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% Pen Strep at 37 ˚C. Before experiments, cells were grown to 80% confluence. For measuring doxorubicin uptake by fluorescence an IGROV-1 cell line stably expressing GFP fused to Histone-1 (H1) was made using the PiggyBac transposon system. As a control to show that effect of doxorubicin on GFP depends on whether it is fused to H1 or not, a stable whole cell expression of GFP by lentiviral transfection and selection by Geneticin was made. For bioluminescence imaging of xenograft tumors, all IGROV-1 cell lines were made to stably express firefly luciferase. To investigate the effect of doxorubicin on other histones, IGROV-1 cells were transiently transfected with a Histone-2B-GFP plasmid (gift from Kurt Anderson) using the Lipofectamine® 2000 reagent. IGROV-1 cells were obtained from Crick institute cell services and confirmed as IGROV-1 by Short Tandem Repeats (STR) profiling and no mycoplasma was detected. In vitro experiments IGROV-1 cells were grown to 80% confluence in 75 ml flasks before being re-plated in 12 or 24 well plates or 35 ml glass bottomed dishes and allowed to attach to the surface for 24 hours before experiments. To study how the fluorescence of GFP labelled H1 labelled IGROV-1 cells changes with doxorubicin treatment, fluorescence intensity and lifetime distributions were measured from cells after 3 hours of incubation with doxorubicin of varying concentrations (0, 0.18, 0.9, 1.8, 9, 18 µM) by serial dilutions of a stock solution with PBS. After 3 of hours, cells were washed in PBS then fixed for 20 minutes in 4% PFA. Cells were then imaged in PBS. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (Sigma-Aldrich, D1515-10 mg) was dissolved in PBS to a concentration of 9 mM and stored at -20˚C. Cell lines IGROV-1 cell lines were cultured in CO2 dependent media with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% Pen Strep at 37 ˚C. Before experiments, cells were grown to 80% confluence. For measuring doxorubicin uptake by fluorescence an IGROV-1 cell line stably expressing GFP fused to Histone-1 (H1) was made using the PiggyBac transposon system. As a control to show that effect of doxorubicin on GFP depends on whether it is fused to H1 or not, a stable whole cell expression of GFP by lentiviral transfection and selection by Geneticin was made. For bioluminescence imaging of xenograft tumors, all IGROV-1 cell lines were made to stably express firefly luciferase. To investigate the effect of doxorubicin on other histones, IGROV-1 cells were transiently transfected with a Histone-2B-GFP plasmid (gift from Kurt Anderson) using the Lipofectamine® 2000 reagent. IGROV-1 cells were obtained from Crick institute cell services and confirmed as IGROV-1 by Short Tandem Repeats (STR) profiling and no mycoplasma was detected. In vitro experiments IGROV-1 cells were grown to 80% confluence in 75 ml flasks before being re-plated in 12 or 24 well plates or 35 ml glass bottomed dishes and allowed to attach to the surface for 24 hours before experiments. To study how the fluorescence of GFP labelled H1 labelled IGROV-1 cells changes with doxorubicin treatment, fluorescence intensity and lifetime distributions were measured from cells after 3 hours of incubation with doxorubicin of varying concentrations (0, 0.18, 0.9, 1.8, 9, 18 µM) by serial dilutions of a stock solution with PBS. After 3 of hours, cells were washed in PBS then fixed for 20 minutes in 4% PFA. Cells were then imaged in PBS. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (Sigma-Aldrich, D1515-10 mg) was dissolved in PBS to a concentration of 9 mM and stored at -20˚C.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Fujii, K.; Young, M.T.; Harris, K.D.M.;
    Publisher: Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre
    Project: WT

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures. Related Article: K.Fujii, M.T.Young, K.D.M.Harris|2011|J.Struct.Biol.|174|461|doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2011.03.001

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wathuo, Miriam; Medley, Graham; Nokes, D. James; Munywoki, Patrick K.;
    Publisher: F1000Research
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Defining pathways of resp... (102975), WT | Household transmission of... (090853)

    Background: A better understanding of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemiology requires realistic estimates of RSV shedding patterns, quantities shed, and identification of the related underlying factors.\ud \ud Methods: RSV infection data arise from a cohort study of 47 households with 493 occupants, in coastal Kenya, during the 2009/2010 RSV season. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken every 3 to 4 days and screened for RSV using a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The amount of virus shed was quantified by calculating the ‘area under the curve’ using the trapezoidal rule applied to rescaled PCR cycle threshold output. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify correlates of amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Results: The median quantity of virus shed per infection episode was 29.4 (95% CI: 15.2, 54.2) log10 ribonucleic acid (RNA) copies. Young age (<1 year), presence of upper respiratory symptoms, intra-household acquisition of infection, an individual’s first infection episode in the RSV season, and having a co-infection of RSV group A and B were associated with increased amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Conclusions: The findings provide insight into which groups of individuals have higher potential for transmission, information which may be useful in designing RSV prevention strategies.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dijk, E.M.S.; Dimitropoulos, Harry; Iatropoulou, Katerina; Foufoulas, Ioannis;
    Publisher: OpenAIRE2020
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: WT , EC | OpenAIRE2020 (643410)

    This deliverable relates to the work carried out under task T8.3, “Research Impact Services”. The task’s focus is on the development of pilots with selected National funding agencies and infrastructure initiatives in order to serve them with the OpenAIRE research impact suite of services. A major service that OpenAIRE provides is the linking of research results to funding. Aside from importing the links from the repositories and journals, OpenAIRE designs, develops and enhances mining algorithms that identify and extract funding information from the text of scientific publications. With the help of NOADs we have initiated bi-lateral, often informal, collaborations with national funding agencies to facilitate mining extraction on their data. This is an on-going activity throughout the duration of the project. Currently the national funding agencies that we are working with are: FCT (Portugal), ARC (Australia), NHMRC (Australia), NSF & NIH (USA), SFI (Ireland), “Ministry of Science Education and Sport” & "Croatian Science Foundation” (Croatia), NWO (Netherlands), and DFG (Germany). This deliverable describes the nature of the data of the identified National funding agencies, as well as their export technologies, and provides the specification of the general-purpose OpenAIRE services required to support research impact measurements.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Montgomery, Lucy;
    Publisher: Blog post from London School of Economics & Political Science
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT

    The crisis in academic publishing raises fundamental questions about the nature of scholarly enquiry and highlights a lack of connection between the prized forms of scholarship and contemporary readers. Lucy Montgomery explains why partnering with an academic publisher could produce a revolutionary approach to making scholarly work available for free.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2007
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chataway, Jo; Chaturvedi, Kalpana; Hanlin, Rebecca; Mugwagwa, Julius; Smith, James; Wield, David;
    Publisher: ESRC Innogen Centre
    Project: WT

    Science, technology and innovation are vital to poverty alleviation and improved health. However, although improving immediate access to health care and existing health technologies is essential, simply importing technologies and products is not enough to create sustainable health care systems. Countries also need to build the capacities and institutions to develop their own technology and innovations which are tailored to local needs.\ud \ud But for innovation to meet local needs, countries need to develop dynamic and integrated health innovation systems. This is for several reasons. Firstly, there tends to be a profound lack of understanding between those in the world of healthcare and those who work in health innovation and production of pharmaceuticals. And unless researchers and producers network with local users and consumers, they are much less likely to respond to local needs.\ud \ud Secondly improved innovation capacity that responds to the needs of users does not occur in isolation - it is not the product of one-off scientific inventions, heavy investment in science or one-off policies. Rather it is dependent on networks through government institutions, private companies and a wide variety of end-user groupings at national, international and sectoral levels. Finally, knowledge is not accumulated and built up in one set of institutions and transferred to another set - it results instead from the interplay between different organisations and institutions.\ud \ud There is now an unparalleled opportunity to address both the issues of neglected diseases and to develop such integrated health innovation systems. Huge investments are currently being made in global health programmes which seek to improve health services and health innovation systems. The challenge for African policymakers is to adopt strategies for integrating global programmes with local and regional health innovation systems.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reis, Pedro;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Country: Portugal
    Project: WT

    The exercise of Environmental Citizenship is strongly associated with a citizen’s capacity to act in society as an agent of change (ENEC 2018), and this depends on the development of a person’s willingness and competence for a critical, active and democratic engagement in preventing and solving environmental problems. There is a call for a citizenry that is well informed and empowered to take appropriate actions on the seriousness of the environmental problems affecting our world (Gray et al. 2009; Hodson 2003). However, many citizens do not feel empowered enough to participate in decision-making processes regarding socio-environmental issues, and, at the same time, the faith and trust in politicians have decreased, and political apathy is gaining ground (Hodson 2014). Throughout the past decade, the surge in authoritarian government practices, the failure of popular movements to replace undemocratic regimes and the increase in populist movements all over the world are fuelling concerns about a possible ‘democratic recession’ (Diamond 2015). Part of the success of this movement has been credited to the failures in mobilising young people’s political participation (Schulz et al. 2018; Jackson et al. 2016). Civic engagement depends on students and their ‘motivation to participate in civic activities, their confidence in the effectiveness of their participation, and their beliefs about their own capacity to become actively involved’ (Schulz et al. 2018, p. 72). Research shows that a student’s civic engagement can be supported and encouraged by school, with the help of (1) open school climates, (2) democratic structures within schools and (3) early opportunities for active participation, the promotion of students’ civic knowledge and the predisposition to engage in civic activities in the future (Schulz et al. 2018; Pancer 2015; Roth and Barton 2004). Therefore, education represents a key element in counteracting low levels of civic engagement among young people, namely, through the promotion of democratic activism (Hodson 2014).

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tickner, Ben J.; Parker, Rachel R.; Whitwood, Adrian C.; Duckett, Simon B.;
    Publisher: Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre
    Project: WT

    Related Article: Ben J. Tickner, Rachel R. Parker, Adrian C. Whitwood, Simon B. Duckett|2019|Organometallics|38|4377|doi:10.1021/acs.organomet.9b00610

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dr. Hugh Sparks; Mr. Steven Hooper; Dr. Erik Sahai;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Tumour Cell Biology Labor... (FC001144)

    Murine xenografts were prepared by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of IGROV-1 cancer cells. IGROV-1 cells were grown to 80% confluence before being trypsinized and re‑suspended in PBS at a concentration of cells per ml. cells were injected into ICRF nude mice. After 14 days post-injection, the presence of intraperitoneal tumors was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging. Briefly, an IVIS bioluminescence imaging system was used to image isoflurane anesthetized mice. 100 µl of D-luciferin (luciferase substrate) at 30mg ml-1 was injected IP 10 minutes before recording of bioluminescence images. The presence of peritoneal tumors was confirmed if bioluminescence signals from the peritoneum were above background noise 10-30 minutes after D‑luciferin injections. Following confirmation of tumors, in vivo fluorescence imaging experiments were carried out after 21 days. To study differences in drug uptake between intravenous or intraperitoneal delivery, prior to imaging mice were subject to IP or IV doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for 1.5, 3 or 24 hours. Imaging involved terminal procedures, mice were anesthetized then peritoneal tumors were exposed by minor surgery and inspected with the CEM. All animal model procedures were approved by The Francis Crick Institute Biological Ethics Committee and UK Home Office authority provided by Project License 70/8380. Murine xenografts were prepared by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of IGROV-1 cancer cells. IGROV-1 cells were grown to 80% confluence before being trypsinized and re‑suspended in PBS at a concentration of cells per ml. cells were injected into ICRF nude mice. After 14 days post-injection, the presence of intraperitoneal tumors was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging. Briefly, an IVIS bioluminescence imaging system was used to image isoflurane anesthetized mice. 100 µl of D-luciferin (luciferase substrate) at 30mg ml-1 was injected IP 10 minutes before recording of bioluminescence images. The presence of peritoneal tumors was confirmed if bioluminescence signals from the peritoneum were above background noise 10-30 minutes after D‑luciferin injections. Following confirmation of tumors, in vivo fluorescence imaging experiments were carried out after 21 days. To study differences in drug uptake between intravenous or intraperitoneal delivery, prior to imaging mice were subject to IP or IV doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for 1.5, 3 or 24 hours. Imaging involved terminal procedures, mice were anesthetized then peritoneal tumors were exposed by minor surgery and inspected with the CEM. All animal model procedures were approved by The Francis Crick Institute Biological Ethics Committee and UK Home Office authority provided by Project License 70/8380.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reddy, Akhilesh B.;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Project: WT
Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.