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  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reis, Pedro;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Country: Portugal
    Project: WT

    The exercise of Environmental Citizenship is strongly associated with a citizen’s capacity to act in society as an agent of change (ENEC 2018), and this depends on the development of a person’s willingness and competence for a critical, active and democratic engagement in preventing and solving environmental problems. There is a call for a citizenry that is well informed and empowered to take appropriate actions on the seriousness of the environmental problems affecting our world (Gray et al. 2009; Hodson 2003). However, many citizens do not feel empowered enough to participate in decision-making processes regarding socio-environmental issues, and, at the same time, the faith and trust in politicians have decreased, and political apathy is gaining ground (Hodson 2014). Throughout the past decade, the surge in authoritarian government practices, the failure of popular movements to replace undemocratic regimes and the increase in populist movements all over the world are fuelling concerns about a possible ‘democratic recession’ (Diamond 2015). Part of the success of this movement has been credited to the failures in mobilising young people’s political participation (Schulz et al. 2018; Jackson et al. 2016). Civic engagement depends on students and their ‘motivation to participate in civic activities, their confidence in the effectiveness of their participation, and their beliefs about their own capacity to become actively involved’ (Schulz et al. 2018, p. 72). Research shows that a student’s civic engagement can be supported and encouraged by school, with the help of (1) open school climates, (2) democratic structures within schools and (3) early opportunities for active participation, the promotion of students’ civic knowledge and the predisposition to engage in civic activities in the future (Schulz et al. 2018; Pancer 2015; Roth and Barton 2004). Therefore, education represents a key element in counteracting low levels of civic engagement among young people, namely, through the promotion of democratic activism (Hodson 2014).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Migale, Roberta; MacIntyre, David; Cacciatore, Stefano; Lee, Yun; Hagberg, Henrik; Herbert, Bronwen; Johnson, Mark; Peebles, Donald; Waddington, Simon; Bennett, Phillip;
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: WT , UKRI | Implications of the Vagin... (MR/L009226/1)

    List of the total number of reads generated for each sample using RNA-Seq. (XLSX 10 kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Menschaert, Gerben; Xiaojing Wang; Jones, Andrew; Ghali, Fawaz; FenyĂś, David; Olexiouk, Volodimir; Zhang, Bing; Deutsch, Eric; Ternent, Tobias; VizcaĂ­No, Juan;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: NIH | iPGDAC, An Integrative Pr... (5U24CA210954-02), NIH | Advancing data and metada... (1R24GM127667-01), NIH | Proteogenomic Data Analys... (1U24CA210972-01), NIH | Development of Trans Prot... (5R01GM087221-07), NIH | Big Data for Discovery Sc... (3U54EB020406-03S1), UKRI | ProteoGenomics: Dynamic L... (BB/L024225/1), UKRI | PROCESS - Proteomics data... (BB/K01997X/1), UKRI | Building the PTM map of t... (BB/L005239/1), WT , NIH | Vanderbilt Proteome Chara... (5U24CA159988-02)

    Detailed description on the two formats presented, proBAM (S1A) and proBed (S1B). (XLSX 46Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Admire Chikandiwa; Burgess, Emma; Otwombe, Kennedy; Chimoyi, Lucy;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: WT | Consortium for Advanced R... (107768)

    Figure S3. Proportion of high-risk births in urban vs. rural regions in Kenya and Zimbabwe. Compares urban and rural high-risk births prevalence in Kenya and Zimbabwe stratified by regional/provincial level. (PNG 189 kb)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wathuo, Miriam; Medley, Graham; Nokes, D. James; Munywoki, Patrick K.;
    Publisher: F1000Research
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Household transmission of... (090853), WT | Defining pathways of resp... (102975)

    Background: A better understanding of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemiology requires realistic estimates of RSV shedding patterns, quantities shed, and identification of the related underlying factors.\ud \ud Methods: RSV infection data arise from a cohort study of 47 households with 493 occupants, in coastal Kenya, during the 2009/2010 RSV season. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken every 3 to 4 days and screened for RSV using a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The amount of virus shed was quantified by calculating the ‘area under the curve’ using the trapezoidal rule applied to rescaled PCR cycle threshold output. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify correlates of amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Results: The median quantity of virus shed per infection episode was 29.4 (95% CI: 15.2, 54.2) log10 ribonucleic acid (RNA) copies. Young age (<1 year), presence of upper respiratory symptoms, intra-household acquisition of infection, an individual’s first infection episode in the RSV season, and having a co-infection of RSV group A and B were associated with increased amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Conclusions: The findings provide insight into which groups of individuals have higher potential for transmission, information which may be useful in designing RSV prevention strategies.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bergholt, Mads S.; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Offeddu, Giovanni S.; Parmar, Paresh A.; Albro, Michael B.; Puetzer, Jennifer L.; Oyen, Michelle L.; Stevens, Molly M.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: WT | Institutional Strategic S... (097816), EC | NATURALE CG (616417), WT , UKRI | Cambridge NanoScience thr... (EP/G037221/1), WT | A Centre for Medical Engi... (088844), UKRI | Acellular Approaches for ... (MR/K026682/1), WT | Institutional Strategic S... (097816), EC | NATURALE CG (616417), WT , UKRI | Cambridge NanoScience thr... (EP/G037221/1),...

    This file contains the raw research data supporting the publication above.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lamberton, Poppy; Cheke, Robert; Walker, Martin; Winskill, Peter; J. Crainey; Boakye, Daniel; Osei-Atweneboana, Mike; IĂąaki Tirados; Wilson, Michael; Tetteh-Kumah, Anthony; +3 more
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: WT

    Bird species recorded in the study. (XLSX 24Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wanbin Hu; Shuxin Yang; Shimada, Yasuhito; Münch, Magnus; Marín-Juez, Rubén; Meijer, Annemarie; Spaink, Herman;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: WT

    Additional file 11: Figure S11. Manual counting analysis for Tg (mpeg1:mCherry-F);TgBAC (mpx: EGFP) of neutrophils (a) and macrophages (b) in 2 dpf tlr2+/+ and tlr2−/− embryos.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Harimalala, Mireille; Telfer, Sandra; Delatte, Hélène; Watts, Phillip; Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Tojo Ramihangihajason; Soanandrasana Rahelinirina; Minoarisoa Rajerison; Boyer, Sébastien;
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: WT | Plague epidemiology and r... (081705), WT , WT | Disease risk in Madagasca... (095171)

    Bidirectional estimate of relative migration rates. The data give relative migration values by pairwise comparisons of the three populations from Madagascar and Mayotte. Analysis was performed using the function divMigrate from the package diveRsity [56]. Jost’s D statistic was used to measure the genetic distance [57] and the bootstrap replicates were set to 1000. (XLSX 9 kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Naseeb, Samina; Ames, Ryan M.; Delneri, Daniela; Lovell, Simon C.;
    Publisher: The Royal Society
    Project: WT

    Duplication of genes or genomes provides the raw material for evolutionary innovation. After duplication a gene may be lost, recombine with another gene, have its function modified, or be retained in an unaltered state. The fate of duplication is usually studied by comparing extant genomes and reconstructing the most likely ancestral states. Valuable as this approach is, it may miss the most rapid evolutionary events. Here, we engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying tandem and non-tandem duplications of the singleton gene IFA38 to monitor (i) the fate of the duplicates in different conditions, including timescale and asymmetry of gene loss and (ii) the changes in fitness and transcriptome of the strains immediately after duplication and after experimental evolution. We found that the duplication brings widespread transcriptional changes but a fitness advantage is only present in fermentable media. In respiratory conditions, the yeast strains consistently lose the non-tandem IFA38 gene copy in a surprisingly short time, within only few generations. This gene loss appears to be asymmetric and dependent on genome location since the original IFA38 copy and the tandem duplicate are retained. Overall, this work shows for the first time that gene loss can be extremely rapid and context dependent.

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