Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
37 Research products, page 1 of 4

  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • European Commission
  • EPOS IP
  • EPOS

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dr. Dimitrios G. Anastasiou; Xanthos Papanikolaou; Dr. Athanassios Ganas; Prof. Demitris Paradissis;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    {"references": ["[1] Contribution to EPOS-IP WP10 STRAIN PRODUCT, Task 10.6 GNSS Products - Guidelines for DDSS Strain-rate derivation maps, A. Ganas, K. Chousianitis, version: 20 December 2016", "[2] Shen, Z.-K., M. Wang, Y. Zeng, and F. Wang, (2015), Strain determination using spatially discrete geodetic data, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 105(4), 2117-2127, doi: 10.1785/0120140247.", "[3] Veis, G., Billiris, H., Nakos, B., and Paradissis, D. (1992), Tectonic strain in Greece from geodetic measurements, C. R. Acad. Sci. Athens, 67:129\u2014166.", "[4] Anastasiou D., Ganas A., Legrand J., Bruyninx C., Papanikolaou X., Tsironi V. and Kapetanidis V. (2019). Tectonic strain distribution over Europe from EPN data. EGU General Assembly 2019, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 21, EGU2019-17744-1"]} StrainTool allows the estimation of Strain Tensor parameters, on the Earth's crust, given a list of data points, aka points on the Earth along with their tectonic velocities. Also provided are output parameters related to the plotting of strains/strain-fields using the Generic Mapping Tools software (http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/gmt/ ). The algorithm to calculate horizontal strains (or strain rates) through interpolation of GNSS velocities is based on the Shen et al (2015) method (doi: 10.1785/0120140247) This software package has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme EPOS under grant agreement N°676564

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Paul Martin; Laurent Remy; Maria Theodoridou; Keith G. Jeffery; Zhiming Zhao;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | ENVRI-FAIR (824068), EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | VRE4EIC (676247), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | ENVRI-FAIR (824068), EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | VRE4EIC (676247), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182)

    Virtual Research Environments (VREs), also known as science gateways or virtual laboratories, assist researchers in data science by integrating tools for data discovery, data retrieval, workflow management and researcher collaboration, often coupled with a specific computing infrastructure. Recently, the push for better open data science has led to the creation of a variety of dedicated research infrastructures (RIs) that gather data and provide services to different research communities, all of which can be used independently of any specific VRE. There is therefore a need for generic VREs that can be coupled with the resources of many different RIs simultaneously, easily customised to the needs of specific communities. The resource metadata produced by these RIs rarely all adhere to any one standard or vocabulary however, making it difficult to search and discover resources independently of their providers without some translation into a common framework. Cross-RI search can be expedited by using mapping services that harvest RI-published metadata to build unified resource catalogues, but the development and operation of such services pose a number of challenges. In this paper, we discuss some of these challenges and look specifically at the VRE4EIC Metadata Portal, which uses X3ML mappings to build a single catalogue for describing data products and other resources provided by multiple RIs. The Metadata Portal was built in accordance to the e-VRE Reference Architecture, a microservice-based architecture for generic modular VREs, and uses the CERIF standard to structure its catalogued metadata. We consider the extent to which it addresses the challenges of cross-RI search, particularly in the environmental and earth science domain, and how it can be further augmented, for example to take advantage of linked vocabularies to provide more intelligent semantic search across multiple domains of discourse.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fengyu Xia; Jan Dousa;
    Publisher: Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics, AS CR
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)
  • Open Access Italian
    Authors: 
    Lazzeri, Emma; Pavone, Gina;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | EOSC-Pillar (857650), EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | EOSC-Pillar (857650)

    Risultati della valutazione del corso "Praticare l'Open Science nelle Scienze della Terra e dell'ambiente"

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    von der Linden, Jens; Kimblin, Clare; McKenna, Ian; Bagley, Skyler; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Houim, Ryan; Kueny, Christopher S.; Kuhl, Allen; Grote, Dave; Converse, Mark; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Background This data is camera images and nozzle pressure gauge voltage traces from rapid decompression shots at the LMU shock tube facility. This data is discussed in the "Materials and Methods" section of the paper "Standing Shock Prevents Propagation of Sparks in Supersonic Explosive Flows". Electric sparks and explosive flows have long been associated with each other. Flowing dust particles originate charge through contact and separate based on inertia, resulting in strong electric fields supporting sparks. These sparks can cause explosions in dusty environments, especially those rich in carbon, such as coal mines and grain elevators. Recent observations of explosive events in nature and decompression experiments indicate that supersonic flows of explosions may alter the electrical discharge process. Shocks may suppress parts of the hierarchy of the discharge phenomena, such as leaders. In our decompression experiments, a shock tube ejects a flow of gas and particles into an expansion chamber. We imaged an illuminated plume from the decompression of a mixture of argon and <100 mg of diamond particles and observe sparks occurring below the sharp boundary of a condensation cloud. We also performed hydrodynamics simulations of the decompression event that provide insight into the conditions supporting the observed behavior. Simulation results agree closely with the experimentally observed Mach disk shock shape and height. This represents direct evidence that the sparks are sculpted by the outflow. The spatial and temporal scale of the sparks transmit an impression of the shock tube flow, a connection that could enable novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible supersonic granular phenomena. Accessing Data The prefixes of the filenames correspond to the shot dates and times listed in table S1 of the paper. The "_camera.zip" files contains tiff images of the camera frames. The ".ixc" file in each zip lists camera settings in plain text. The ".dat" file contains the voltage measurement of the nozzle pressure gauge. Row 1 is the header, row 2 is the time in seconds, and row 3 is the voltage of the pressure gauge in Volts. The peak pressure in the header can be used to relate the voltage to pressure. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and Mission Support and Test Services, LLC, under Contract No. DE-NA0003624 with support from the Site-Directed Research and Development program, DOE/NV/03624--0956, and in part by the European Plate Observing Systems Transnational Access program of the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation program under grant N 676564. CC acknowledges the support from the DFG grant CI 25/2-1 and from the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska Curie grant nr. 705619. LLNL-MI-817289. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, complete- ness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific com- mercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. {"references": ["C. Cimarelli, M. Alatorre-Ibargengoitia, U. Kueppers, B. Scheu, D. Dingwell, Experimen- tal generation of volcanic lightning. Geology 42, 79\u201382 (2014)"]}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C.; Rejas, M.; Lobo Aleu, Agustín; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; +2 more
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    This dataset compiles SEM images, modelled isopach map and topographic profiles, and data of radiocarbon ages, parameters of Tephra2 and AshCalc codes of Holocene volcanic ashes of of Southern Puna and neighbouring areas (NW Argentina). SEM images detail differences among the Bolsón de Fiambalá, Cerro Blanco and Cueros de Purulla fallout ash deposits. Tephra2 code was used to simulate the ash fallout, and the AshCalc code to compare different methods for ash volume estimates associated with the 4.2 ka cal BP eruption of the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex. Topographic profiles are used to explain the secondary thickening of fallout ash deposits. Material suplementario (Figuras S1-S4 y Tablas S1-S4 del artículo Fernandez-Turiel, J.-L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C., Rejas, M.; Lobo, A.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; Gallardo, J.; Ratto, N. (2019). The large eruption 4.2 ka cal BP in Cerro Blanco, Central Volcanic Zone, Andes: Insights to the Holocene eruptive deposits in the southern Puna and adjacent regions. Estudios Geológicos 75(1): e088. https://doi.org/10.3989/egeol.43438.515 MINECO, CGL2011-23307, Proyecto QUECA Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Louis De Barros; Frédéric Cappa; Yves Guglielmi; Laure Duboeuf; Jean-Robert Grasso;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United States, France
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564), ANR | HYDROSEIS (ANR-13-JS06-0004), EC | SERA (730900)

    International audience; The ability to predict the magnitude of an earthquake caused by deep fluid injections is an important factor for assessing the safety of the reservoir storage and the seismic hazard. Here, we propose a new approach to evaluate the seismic energy released during fluid injection by integrating injection parameters, induced aseismic deformation, and the distance of earthquake sources from injection. We use data from ten injection experiments performed at a decameter scale into fault zones in limestone and shale formations. We observe that the seismic energy and the hydraulic energy similarly depend on the injected fluid volume (V), as they both scale as V3/2. They show, however, a large discrepancy, partly related to a large aseismic deformation. Therefore, to accurately predict the released seismic energy, aseismic deformation should be considered in the budget through the residual deformation measured at the injection. Alternatively, the minimal hypocentral distance from injection points and the critical fluid pressure for fault reactivation can be used for a better prediction of the seismic moment in the total compilation of earthquakes observed during these experiments. Complementary to the prediction based only on the injected fluid volume, our approach opens the possibility of using alternative monitoring parameters to improve traffic-light protocols for induced earthquakes and the regulation of operational injection activities.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dino Bindi; Riccardo Zaccarelli; Angelo Strollo; Domenico Di Giacomo;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Pavel Kalenda; Rudolf Tengler; Stanka Šebela; Matej Blatnik; Andrej Gosar;
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) named “Roteg” was used to detect known and unknown passages of Divaska Jama and Trhlovca caves in SW Slovenia. “Roteg’s” main characteristics are an extraordinary high power output (20 MW) and high voltage on antennas (up to 20 kV), which allows penetration more than ten times deeper than common GPRs. During the measurement we used 3-m long antennas (50 MHz) with a central frequency of 50 MHz and we clearly detected the reflections from the depth of 200 m after data processing. During field survey 22 profiles were completed with a total length of 4487.97 m. Pretnerjeva and Žibernova Dvorana chambers in Divaska Jama were well visible on radarograms. New big cavities, which were detected below profiles P18, P21 and P22, are almost all at the same level of 350 – 400 m a.s.l. There is another group of cavities at a level of 420 – 450 m a.s.l., which corresponds to Trhlovca. Both cave groups are separated by the gap which extends in the vertical direction, and probably presents a tectonic zone, which is as well visible on the radarograms. By the use of “Roteg” at the karst surface we were able to detect known caves, new - unknown caves and tectonic zones up to 200 m below the surface. Key words: ground penetrating radar, caves, karst, Divaska Jama, Trhlovca, Slovenia. Dolocitev rovov Divaske jame v JZ smeri za Trhlovco z uporabo zelo mocnega nizkofrekvencnega georadarja Nizkofrekvencni georadar (GPR), imenovan »Roteg«, smo uporabili pri zaznavi znanih in neznanih rovov Divaske jame in Trhlovce v JZ Sloveniji. »Rotegove« glavne znacilnosti so izjemna moc (20 MW) in visoka napetost do 20 kV na antenah, kar omogoca penetracijo, ki je vec kot desetkrat globlja, kot jo dosežejo obicajni georadarji. Med meritvami smo uporabili 3 m dolgi anteni (50 MHz) s srediscno frekvenco 50 MHz. Tako smo po obdelavi podatkov jasno zaznali odboje iz globine 200 m. Med terenskimi meritvami smo izmerili 22 profilov s skupno dolžino 4490 m. Pretnerjeva in Žibernova dvorana v Divaski jami sta bili dobro vidni na georadarskih profilih. Nove velike jame, ki smo jih zaznali pod profili P18, P21 in P22, so skoraj vse na istem nivoju, 350–400 m nad morjem. Druga skupina jam na nadmorski visini 420–450 m ustreza Trhlovci. Obe skupini jam sta loceni z vrzeljo v navpicni smeri, ki je verjetno tektonska cona in je dobro vidna na georadarskih profilih. Z uporabo »Rotega« na kraskem povrsju smo dolocili znane jame, nove neznane jame in tektonske cone do globine 200 m pod povrsjem. Kljucne besede: georadar (GPR), jame, kras, Divaska jama, Trhlovca, Slovenija.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Raffaele Castaldo; R. de Nardis; V. DeNovellis; Federica Ferrarini; Riccardo Lanari; Giusy Lavecchia; Susi Pepe; Giuseppe Solaro; Pietro Tizzani;
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    We investigate the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake (AQE, M-w 6.3, Italy) through a 3-D Finite Element (FE) mechanical model based on the exploitation of ENVISAT DInSAR and GPS measurements and an independently generated fault model. The proposed approach mainly consists of (a) the generation of a 3-D fault model of the active structures involved in the sequence and those neighboring to them, benefiting of a large geological and seismological data set; (b) the implementation of the generated 3-D fault model in a FE environment, by exploiting the elastic dislocation theory and considering the curved fault geometry and the crustal heterogeneities information; and (c) the optimization of the seismogenic crustal blocks model parameters in order to reproduce the geodetic measurements. We show that our modeling approach allows us to well reproduce the coseismic surface displacements, including their significant asymmetric pattern, as shown by the very good fit between the modeled ground deformations and the geodetic measurements. Moreover, a comparative analysis between our FE model results and those obtained by considering a classical analytical (Okada) model, for both the surface displacements and the Coulomb stress changes, has been performed. Our model permits to investigate the coseismic stress and strain field changes relevant to the investigated volume and their relationships with the surrounding geological structures; moreover, it highlights the very good correlation with the seismicity spatial distribution. The retrieved stress field changes show different maxima: (a) at few kilometers depth, within the main event surface rupture zone; (b) at depths of 5-9 km in correspondence of main event hypocentral area, along the SW dipping Paganica Fault System (PFS); and (c) at depths of 12-14 km, in correspondence of the largest aftershock hypocentral area, along a steep segment of an underlying east dipping basal detachment. Moreover, the main event hypocenter is localized in a region of high-gradient strain field changes, while a deeper volumetric dilatation lobe involves the largest aftershock zone. From these findings, we argue that the AQE hanging wall downward movement along the steep portion of PFS might have been modulated by the underlying basal detachment; on the other hand, the coseismic eastward motion of the PFS footwall might have triggered further slip on the OS, thus releasing the largest aftershock on an independent source. The retrieved stress and strain field changes, which support the active role of the OS, have been also validated through a comparative analysis with those obtained from independent geological, seismological, and GPS measurements.

Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.