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63 Research products, page 1 of 7

  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • 2013-2022
  • Open Access
  • European Commission
  • EPOS IP
  • EPOS

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rémy Bossu; Matthieu Landès; Fréderic Roussel; Robert Steed; Gilles Mazet-Roux; Stacey S Martin; Susan E. Hough;
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The collection of earthquake testimonies (i.e., qualitative descriptions of felt shaking) is essential for macroseismic studies (i.e., studies gathering information on how strongly an earthquake was felt in different places), and when done rapidly and systematically, improves situational awareness and in turn can contribute to efficient emergency response. In this study, we present advances made in the collection of testimonies following earthquakes around the world using a thumbnail‐based questionnaire implemented on the European‐Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) smartphone app and its website compatible for mobile devices. In both instances, the questionnaire consists of a selection of thumbnails, each representing an intensity level of the European Macroseismic Scale 1998. We find that testimonies are collected faster, and in larger numbers, by way of thumbnail‐based questionnaires than by more traditional online questionnaires. Responses were received from all seismically active regions of our planet, suggesting that thumbnails overcome language barriers. We also observed that the app is not sufficient on its own, because the websites are the main source of testimonies when an earthquake strikes a region for the first time in a while; it is only for subsequent shocks that the app is widely used. Notably though, the speed of the collection of testimonies increases significantly when the app is used. We find that automated EMSC intensities as assigned by user‐specified thumbnails are, on average, well correlated with “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) responses and with the three independently and manually derived macroseismic datasets, but there is a tendency for EMSC to be biased low with respect to DYFI at moderate and large intensities. We address this by proposing a simple adjustment that will be verified in future earthquakes.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jan Wiszniowski; Nguyen Van Giang; Beata Plesiewicz; Grzegorz Lizurek; Dinh Quoc Van; Le Quang Khoi; Stanislaw Lasocki;
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Song Tranh 2 hydropower plant and the reservoir containing backed up water are located in the Quang Nam province (Central Vietnam). The region experiences unusual seismic activity related to the reservoir impoundment, with earthquakes of magnitude up to 4.7. In result of cooperation between the Institute of Geophysics, Vietnam Academy of Sciences and Technology and the Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences a seismic network has been built to facilitate seismic monitoring of the Song Tranh 2 area. The network, operating since August 2013, consists of 10 seismic stations. Here we show that the network is sufficient for advanced data processing. The first results of monitoring of the earthquake activity in Song Tranh 2 area in the period between 2012 and 2014, especially the completeness of catalogs, study and comparisons between water level and the seismic activity suggest direct connection between reservoir exploitation and anthropogenic seismicity.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anastasiou, Dimitrios G.; Papanikolaou, Xanthos; Dr. Athanassios Ganas; Prof. Demitris Paradissis;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    {"references": ["[1] Contribution to EPOS-IP WP10 STRAIN PRODUCT, Task 10.6 GNSS Products - Guidelines for DDSS Strain-rate derivation maps, A. Ganas, K. Chousianitis, version: 20 December 2016", "[2] Shen, Z.-K., M. Wang, Y. Zeng, and F. Wang, (2015), Strain determination using spatially discrete geodetic data, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 105(4), 2117-2127, doi: 10.1785/0120140247.", "[3] Veis, G., Billiris, H., Nakos, B., and Paradissis, D. (1992), Tectonic strain in Greece from geodetic measurements, C. R. Acad. Sci. Athens, 67:129\u2014166.", "[4] Anastasiou D., Ganas A., Legrand J., Bruyninx C., Papanikolaou X., Tsironi V. and Kapetanidis V. (2019). Tectonic strain distribution over Europe from EPN data. EGU General Assembly 2019, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 21, EGU2019-17744-1"]} StrainTool allows the estimation of Strain Tensor parameters, on the Earth's crust, given a list of data points, aka points on the Earth along with their tectonic velocities. Also provided are output parameters related to the plotting of strains/strain-fields using the Generic Mapping Tools software (http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/gmt/ ). The algorithm to calculate horizontal strains (or strain rates) through interpolation of GNSS velocities is based on the Shen et al (2015) method (doi: 10.1785/0120140247) This software package has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme EPOS under grant agreement N°676564

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Paul Martin; Laurent Remy; Maria Theodoridou; Keith G. Jeffery; Zhiming Zhao;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | ENVRI-FAIR (824068), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    Virtual Research Environments (VREs), also known as science gateways or virtual laboratories, assist researchers in data science by integrating tools for data discovery, data retrieval, workflow management and researcher collaboration, often coupled with a specific computing infrastructure. Recently, the push for better open data science has led to the creation of a variety of dedicated research infrastructures (RIs) that gather data and provide services to different research communities, all of which can be used independently of any specific VRE. There is therefore a need for generic VREs that can be coupled with the resources of many different RIs simultaneously, easily customised to the needs of specific communities. The resource metadata produced by these RIs rarely all adhere to any one standard or vocabulary however, making it difficult to search and discover resources independently of their providers without some translation into a common framework. Cross-RI search can be expedited by using mapping services that harvest RI-published metadata to build unified resource catalogues, but the development and operation of such services pose a number of challenges. In this paper, we discuss some of these challenges and look specifically at the VRE4EIC Metadata Portal, which uses X3ML mappings to build a single catalogue for describing data products and other resources provided by multiple RIs. The Metadata Portal was built in accordance to the e-VRE Reference Architecture, a microservice-based architecture for generic modular VREs, and uses the CERIF standard to structure its catalogued metadata. We consider the extent to which it addresses the challenges of cross-RI search, particularly in the environmental and earth science domain, and how it can be further augmented, for example to take advantage of linked vocabularies to provide more intelligent semantic search across multiple domains of discourse.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fengyu Xia; Jan Dousa;
    Publisher: Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics, AS CR
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Peter Evans; Angelo Strollo; Adam Clark; Tim Ahern; Robert Newman; John Clinton; Helle Pedersen; Catherine Pequegnat;
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    In a move to give credit where it's due, the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks will link digital object identifiers to data from seismic networks and project deployments.

  • Open Access Italian
    Authors: 
    Lazzeri, Emma; Pavone, Gina;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), EC | EOSC-Pillar (857650), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Risultati della valutazione del corso "Praticare l'Open Science nelle Scienze della Terra e dell'ambiente"

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Freda, Carmela; Giardini, Domenico; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kohler, Elisabeth; Kontkanen, Pirjo; Lauterjung, Jörn; Pedersen, Helle; +2 more
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    EPOS – the European Plate Observing System – is the ESFRI infrastructure serving the need of the solid Earth science community at large. The EPOS mission is to create a single sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework. Thematic Core Services (TCS) and Integrated Core Services (Central Hub, ICS-C and Distributed, ICS-D) are key elements, together with NRIs (National Research Infrastructures), in the EPOS architecture. Following the preparatory phase, EPOS has initiated formal steps to adopt an ERIC legal framework (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). The statutory seat of EPOS will be in Rome, Italy, while the ICS-C will be jointly operated by France, UK and Denmark. The TCS planned so far cover: seismology, near-fault observatories, GNSS data and products, volcano observations, satellite data, geomagnetic observations, anthropogenic hazards, geological information modelling, multiscale laboratories and geo-energy test beds for low carbon energy. In the ERIC process, EPOS and all its services must achieve sustainability from a legal, governance, financial, and technical point of view, as well as full harmonization with national infrastructure roadmaps. As EPOS is a distributed infrastructure, the TCSs have to be linked to the future EPOS ERIC from legal and governance perspectives. For this purpose the TCSs have started to organize themselves as consortia and negotiate agreements to define the roles of the different actors in the consortium as well as their commitment to contribute to the EPOS activities. The link to the EPOS ERIC shall be made by service agreements of dedicated Service Providers. A common EPOS data policy has also been developed, based on the general principles of Open Access and paying careful attention to licensing issues, quality control, and intellectual property rights, which shall apply to the data, data products, software and services (DDSS) accessible through EPOS. From a financial standpoint, EPOS elaborated common guidelines for all institutions providing services, and selected a costing model and funding approach which foresees a mixed support of the services via national contributions and ERIC membership fees. In the EPOS multi-disciplinary environment, harmonization and integration are required at different levels and with a variety of different stakeholders; to this purpose, a Service Coordination Board (SCB) and technical Harmonization Groups (HGs) were established to develop the EPOS metadata standards with the EPOS Integrated Central Services, and to harmonize data and product standards with other projects at European and international level, including e.g. ENVRI+, EUDAT and EarthCube (US). Geophysical Research Abstracts, 19 ISSN:1607-7962 ISSN:1029-7006

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C.; Rejas, M.; Lobo, A.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; +2 more
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    This dataset compiles SEM images, modelled isopach map and topographic profiles, and data of radiocarbon ages, parameters of Tephra2 and AshCalc codes of Holocene volcanic ashes of of Southern Puna and neighbouring areas (NW Argentina). SEM images detail differences among the Bolsón de Fiambalá, Cerro Blanco and Cueros de Purulla fallout ash deposits. Tephra2 code was used to simulate the ash fallout, and the AshCalc code to compare different methods for ash volume estimates associated with the 4.2 ka cal BP eruption of the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex. Topographic profiles are used to explain the secondary thickening of fallout ash deposits. Material suplementario (Figuras S1-S4 y Tablas S1-S4 del artículo Fernandez-Turiel, J.-L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C., Rejas, M.; Lobo, A.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; Gallardo, J.; Ratto, N. (2019). The large eruption 4.2 ka cal BP in Cerro Blanco, Central Volcanic Zone, Andes: Insights to the Holocene eruptive deposits in the southern Puna and adjacent regions. Estudios Geológicos 75(1): e088. https://doi.org/10.3989/egeol.43438.515 MINECO, CGL2011-23307, Proyecto QUECA Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    von der Linden, Jens; Kimblin, Clare; McKenna, Ian; Bagley, Skyler; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Houim, Ryan; Kueny, Christopher S.; Kuhl, Allen; Grote, Dave; Converse, Mark; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Background This data is camera images and nozzle pressure gauge voltage traces from rapid decompression shots at the LMU shock tube facility. This data is discussed in the "Materials and Methods" section of the paper "Standing Shock Prevents Propagation of Sparks in Supersonic Explosive Flows". Electric sparks and explosive flows have long been associated with each other. Flowing dust particles originate charge through contact and separate based on inertia, resulting in strong electric fields supporting sparks. These sparks can cause explosions in dusty environments, especially those rich in carbon, such as coal mines and grain elevators. Recent observations of explosive events in nature and decompression experiments indicate that supersonic flows of explosions may alter the electrical discharge process. Shocks may suppress parts of the hierarchy of the discharge phenomena, such as leaders. In our decompression experiments, a shock tube ejects a flow of gas and particles into an expansion chamber. We imaged an illuminated plume from the decompression of a mixture of argon and <100 mg of diamond particles and observe sparks occurring below the sharp boundary of a condensation cloud. We also performed hydrodynamics simulations of the decompression event that provide insight into the conditions supporting the observed behavior. Simulation results agree closely with the experimentally observed Mach disk shock shape and height. This represents direct evidence that the sparks are sculpted by the outflow. The spatial and temporal scale of the sparks transmit an impression of the shock tube flow, a connection that could enable novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible supersonic granular phenomena. Accessing Data The prefixes of the filenames correspond to the shot dates and times listed in table S1 of the paper. The "_camera.zip" files contains tiff images of the camera frames. The ".ixc" file in each zip lists camera settings in plain text. The ".dat" file contains the voltage measurement of the nozzle pressure gauge. Row 1 is the header, row 2 is the time in seconds, and row 3 is the voltage of the pressure gauge in Volts. The peak pressure in the header can be used to relate the voltage to pressure. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and Mission Support and Test Services, LLC, under Contract No. DE-NA0003624 with support from the Site-Directed Research and Development program, DOE/NV/03624--0956, and in part by the European Plate Observing Systems Transnational Access program of the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation program under grant N 676564. CC acknowledges the support from the DFG grant CI 25/2-1 and from the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska Curie grant nr. 705619. LLNL-MI-817289. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, complete- ness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific com- mercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. {"references": ["C. Cimarelli, M. Alatorre-Ibargengoitia, U. Kueppers, B. Scheu, D. Dingwell, Experimen- tal generation of volcanic lightning. Geology 42, 79\u201382 (2014)"]}

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Include:
63 Research products, page 1 of 7
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rémy Bossu; Matthieu Landès; Fréderic Roussel; Robert Steed; Gilles Mazet-Roux; Stacey S Martin; Susan E. Hough;
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The collection of earthquake testimonies (i.e., qualitative descriptions of felt shaking) is essential for macroseismic studies (i.e., studies gathering information on how strongly an earthquake was felt in different places), and when done rapidly and systematically, improves situational awareness and in turn can contribute to efficient emergency response. In this study, we present advances made in the collection of testimonies following earthquakes around the world using a thumbnail‐based questionnaire implemented on the European‐Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) smartphone app and its website compatible for mobile devices. In both instances, the questionnaire consists of a selection of thumbnails, each representing an intensity level of the European Macroseismic Scale 1998. We find that testimonies are collected faster, and in larger numbers, by way of thumbnail‐based questionnaires than by more traditional online questionnaires. Responses were received from all seismically active regions of our planet, suggesting that thumbnails overcome language barriers. We also observed that the app is not sufficient on its own, because the websites are the main source of testimonies when an earthquake strikes a region for the first time in a while; it is only for subsequent shocks that the app is widely used. Notably though, the speed of the collection of testimonies increases significantly when the app is used. We find that automated EMSC intensities as assigned by user‐specified thumbnails are, on average, well correlated with “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) responses and with the three independently and manually derived macroseismic datasets, but there is a tendency for EMSC to be biased low with respect to DYFI at moderate and large intensities. We address this by proposing a simple adjustment that will be verified in future earthquakes.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Jan Wiszniowski; Nguyen Van Giang; Beata Plesiewicz; Grzegorz Lizurek; Dinh Quoc Van; Le Quang Khoi; Stanislaw Lasocki;
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Song Tranh 2 hydropower plant and the reservoir containing backed up water are located in the Quang Nam province (Central Vietnam). The region experiences unusual seismic activity related to the reservoir impoundment, with earthquakes of magnitude up to 4.7. In result of cooperation between the Institute of Geophysics, Vietnam Academy of Sciences and Technology and the Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences a seismic network has been built to facilitate seismic monitoring of the Song Tranh 2 area. The network, operating since August 2013, consists of 10 seismic stations. Here we show that the network is sufficient for advanced data processing. The first results of monitoring of the earthquake activity in Song Tranh 2 area in the period between 2012 and 2014, especially the completeness of catalogs, study and comparisons between water level and the seismic activity suggest direct connection between reservoir exploitation and anthropogenic seismicity.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Anastasiou, Dimitrios G.; Papanikolaou, Xanthos; Dr. Athanassios Ganas; Prof. Demitris Paradissis;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    {"references": ["[1] Contribution to EPOS-IP WP10 STRAIN PRODUCT, Task 10.6 GNSS Products - Guidelines for DDSS Strain-rate derivation maps, A. Ganas, K. Chousianitis, version: 20 December 2016", "[2] Shen, Z.-K., M. Wang, Y. Zeng, and F. Wang, (2015), Strain determination using spatially discrete geodetic data, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 105(4), 2117-2127, doi: 10.1785/0120140247.", "[3] Veis, G., Billiris, H., Nakos, B., and Paradissis, D. (1992), Tectonic strain in Greece from geodetic measurements, C. R. Acad. Sci. Athens, 67:129\u2014166.", "[4] Anastasiou D., Ganas A., Legrand J., Bruyninx C., Papanikolaou X., Tsironi V. and Kapetanidis V. (2019). Tectonic strain distribution over Europe from EPN data. EGU General Assembly 2019, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 21, EGU2019-17744-1"]} StrainTool allows the estimation of Strain Tensor parameters, on the Earth's crust, given a list of data points, aka points on the Earth along with their tectonic velocities. Also provided are output parameters related to the plotting of strains/strain-fields using the Generic Mapping Tools software (http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/gmt/ ). The algorithm to calculate horizontal strains (or strain rates) through interpolation of GNSS velocities is based on the Shen et al (2015) method (doi: 10.1785/0120140247) This software package has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme EPOS under grant agreement N°676564

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Paul Martin; Laurent Remy; Maria Theodoridou; Keith G. Jeffery; Zhiming Zhao;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | ENVRI-FAIR (824068), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    Virtual Research Environments (VREs), also known as science gateways or virtual laboratories, assist researchers in data science by integrating tools for data discovery, data retrieval, workflow management and researcher collaboration, often coupled with a specific computing infrastructure. Recently, the push for better open data science has led to the creation of a variety of dedicated research infrastructures (RIs) that gather data and provide services to different research communities, all of which can be used independently of any specific VRE. There is therefore a need for generic VREs that can be coupled with the resources of many different RIs simultaneously, easily customised to the needs of specific communities. The resource metadata produced by these RIs rarely all adhere to any one standard or vocabulary however, making it difficult to search and discover resources independently of their providers without some translation into a common framework. Cross-RI search can be expedited by using mapping services that harvest RI-published metadata to build unified resource catalogues, but the development and operation of such services pose a number of challenges. In this paper, we discuss some of these challenges and look specifically at the VRE4EIC Metadata Portal, which uses X3ML mappings to build a single catalogue for describing data products and other resources provided by multiple RIs. The Metadata Portal was built in accordance to the e-VRE Reference Architecture, a microservice-based architecture for generic modular VREs, and uses the CERIF standard to structure its catalogued metadata. We consider the extent to which it addresses the challenges of cross-RI search, particularly in the environmental and earth science domain, and how it can be further augmented, for example to take advantage of linked vocabularies to provide more intelligent semantic search across multiple domains of discourse.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fengyu Xia; Jan Dousa;
    Publisher: Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics, AS CR
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Peter Evans; Angelo Strollo; Adam Clark; Tim Ahern; Robert Newman; John Clinton; Helle Pedersen; Catherine Pequegnat;
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    In a move to give credit where it's due, the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks will link digital object identifiers to data from seismic networks and project deployments.

  • Open Access Italian
    Authors: 
    Lazzeri, Emma; Pavone, Gina;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), EC | EOSC-Pillar (857650), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Risultati della valutazione del corso "Praticare l'Open Science nelle Scienze della Terra e dell'ambiente"

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Freda, Carmela; Giardini, Domenico; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kohler, Elisabeth; Kontkanen, Pirjo; Lauterjung, Jörn; Pedersen, Helle; +2 more
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    EPOS – the European Plate Observing System – is the ESFRI infrastructure serving the need of the solid Earth science community at large. The EPOS mission is to create a single sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework. Thematic Core Services (TCS) and Integrated Core Services (Central Hub, ICS-C and Distributed, ICS-D) are key elements, together with NRIs (National Research Infrastructures), in the EPOS architecture. Following the preparatory phase, EPOS has initiated formal steps to adopt an ERIC legal framework (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). The statutory seat of EPOS will be in Rome, Italy, while the ICS-C will be jointly operated by France, UK and Denmark. The TCS planned so far cover: seismology, near-fault observatories, GNSS data and products, volcano observations, satellite data, geomagnetic observations, anthropogenic hazards, geological information modelling, multiscale laboratories and geo-energy test beds for low carbon energy. In the ERIC process, EPOS and all its services must achieve sustainability from a legal, governance, financial, and technical point of view, as well as full harmonization with national infrastructure roadmaps. As EPOS is a distributed infrastructure, the TCSs have to be linked to the future EPOS ERIC from legal and governance perspectives. For this purpose the TCSs have started to organize themselves as consortia and negotiate agreements to define the roles of the different actors in the consortium as well as their commitment to contribute to the EPOS activities. The link to the EPOS ERIC shall be made by service agreements of dedicated Service Providers. A common EPOS data policy has also been developed, based on the general principles of Open Access and paying careful attention to licensing issues, quality control, and intellectual property rights, which shall apply to the data, data products, software and services (DDSS) accessible through EPOS. From a financial standpoint, EPOS elaborated common guidelines for all institutions providing services, and selected a costing model and funding approach which foresees a mixed support of the services via national contributions and ERIC membership fees. In the EPOS multi-disciplinary environment, harmonization and integration are required at different levels and with a variety of different stakeholders; to this purpose, a Service Coordination Board (SCB) and technical Harmonization Groups (HGs) were established to develop the EPOS metadata standards with the EPOS Integrated Central Services, and to harmonize data and product standards with other projects at European and international level, including e.g. ENVRI+, EUDAT and EarthCube (US). Geophysical Research Abstracts, 19 ISSN:1607-7962 ISSN:1029-7006

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C.; Rejas, M.; Lobo, A.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; +2 more
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    This dataset compiles SEM images, modelled isopach map and topographic profiles, and data of radiocarbon ages, parameters of Tephra2 and AshCalc codes of Holocene volcanic ashes of of Southern Puna and neighbouring areas (NW Argentina). SEM images detail differences among the Bolsón de Fiambalá, Cerro Blanco and Cueros de Purulla fallout ash deposits. Tephra2 code was used to simulate the ash fallout, and the AshCalc code to compare different methods for ash volume estimates associated with the 4.2 ka cal BP eruption of the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex. Topographic profiles are used to explain the secondary thickening of fallout ash deposits. Material suplementario (Figuras S1-S4 y Tablas S1-S4 del artículo Fernandez-Turiel, J.-L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C., Rejas, M.; Lobo, A.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; Gallardo, J.; Ratto, N. (2019). The large eruption 4.2 ka cal BP in Cerro Blanco, Central Volcanic Zone, Andes: Insights to the Holocene eruptive deposits in the southern Puna and adjacent regions. Estudios Geológicos 75(1): e088. https://doi.org/10.3989/egeol.43438.515 MINECO, CGL2011-23307, Proyecto QUECA Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    von der Linden, Jens; Kimblin, Clare; McKenna, Ian; Bagley, Skyler; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Houim, Ryan; Kueny, Christopher S.; Kuhl, Allen; Grote, Dave; Converse, Mark; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Background This data is camera images and nozzle pressure gauge voltage traces from rapid decompression shots at the LMU shock tube facility. This data is discussed in the "Materials and Methods" section of the paper "Standing Shock Prevents Propagation of Sparks in Supersonic Explosive Flows". Electric sparks and explosive flows have long been associated with each other. Flowing dust particles originate charge through contact and separate based on inertia, resulting in strong electric fields supporting sparks. These sparks can cause explosions in dusty environments, especially those rich in carbon, such as coal mines and grain elevators. Recent observations of explosive events in nature and decompression experiments indicate that supersonic flows of explosions may alter the electrical discharge process. Shocks may suppress parts of the hierarchy of the discharge phenomena, such as leaders. In our decompression experiments, a shock tube ejects a flow of gas and particles into an expansion chamber. We imaged an illuminated plume from the decompression of a mixture of argon and <100 mg of diamond particles and observe sparks occurring below the sharp boundary of a condensation cloud. We also performed hydrodynamics simulations of the decompression event that provide insight into the conditions supporting the observed behavior. Simulation results agree closely with the experimentally observed Mach disk shock shape and height. This represents direct evidence that the sparks are sculpted by the outflow. The spatial and temporal scale of the sparks transmit an impression of the shock tube flow, a connection that could enable novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible supersonic granular phenomena. Accessing Data The prefixes of the filenames correspond to the shot dates and times listed in table S1 of the paper. The "_camera.zip" files contains tiff images of the camera frames. The ".ixc" file in each zip lists camera settings in plain text. The ".dat" file contains the voltage measurement of the nozzle pressure gauge. Row 1 is the header, row 2 is the time in seconds, and row 3 is the voltage of the pressure gauge in Volts. The peak pressure in the header can be used to relate the voltage to pressure. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and Mission Support and Test Services, LLC, under Contract No. DE-NA0003624 with support from the Site-Directed Research and Development program, DOE/NV/03624--0956, and in part by the European Plate Observing Systems Transnational Access program of the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation program under grant N 676564. CC acknowledges the support from the DFG grant CI 25/2-1 and from the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska Curie grant nr. 705619. LLNL-MI-817289. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, complete- ness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific com- mercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. {"references": ["C. Cimarelli, M. Alatorre-Ibargengoitia, U. Kueppers, B. Scheu, D. Dingwell, Experimen- tal generation of volcanic lightning. Geology 42, 79\u201382 (2014)"]}

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