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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Chile. Ministerio de Salud;

    En contexto de Pandemia COVID-19 el Ministerio de Salud NO SUGIERE el uso de mascarillas quirúrgicas en población general. [Marzo 21, 2020]

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Government of Canada;

    Objective: This tool will assist in considering risks associated with the use of parks and outdoor recreational spaces during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and provide examples of strategies that may be implemented to reduce potential risks. Audience: Those responsible for parks and outdoor recreational places and programming (e.g., federal/provincial/territorial, and local/municipal authorities, Indigenous leadership, sports and recreation organizations and coaches and leaders). Outdoor recreation spaces or recreational activities that require staff (for example to accept payment for entrance fees, to provide food and beverage services, etc.) should also refer to the tool for workplaces and businesses for guidance on risk assessment and risk mitigation related to business operations.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kernohan, Ashleigh; Calderon, Maria;

    BACKGROUND: An emerging issue in the management of the novel COVID-19 coronavirus is morbidity and mortality associated with venous thrombolytic events. Apart from respiratory failure, coagulopathy is a common abnormality in patients with COVID‐19, with elevated levels of both fibrinogen and D‐dimer. For example, Oudkerk at al noted a number of case studies describing thrombolytic events in COVID-19 patients in their report, raising concerns about this issue. When considering management advice for patients with COVID-19 it is important to consider two factors. Firstly, what are the risk factors associated with thrombolytic events in COVID-19 patients? Secondly, what are the optimal strategies for prophylaxis and treatments for thrombolytic events in this patient groups? Understanding the current evidence for both risk factors and management strategies for venous thrombolytic events (VTE) in the these groups will aid clinical decision making. To contribute to this knowledge base, we conducted a rapid literature review using a systematic search method to identify relevant studies in relation to risk factors or managements of VTEs. METHODS: Studies included in this review were primary studies which assess risks and management of thrombolytic events in COVID-19 patients. The following search strategy was applied to Medline and EMBASE on 07/05/2020 with no limits. (“COVID-19” or COVID19 or COVID-19 or “coronavirus disease 2019” or “coronavirus disease-19” or “2019-nCoV disease” or “severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2” or “Wuhan coronavirus” or “COVID-19 virus” or “SARS-CoV-2” or “SARS2” or “2019-nCoV” or “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019 novel coronavirus infection” AND (“D-dimer” or “coagulation parameter” or “venous thromboembolism” or “novel coronavirus pneumonia” or “blood coagulation” or “fibrin fibrinogen degradation products” or “vein thrombosis” or “thrombosis” or “lung embolism” or “PE” or “thromboembolism” or “venous thromboembolism” or “pulmonary embolism “).af. RESULTS: Included studies. The search returned 364 studied after duplicates were removed, of which 9 were included. Most of the studies which were included from France (4 studies) the other studies came from Italy (2 studies), China (1 study), the USA (1 study) and the Netherlands (1 study). Most studies were Retrospective case series, this includes Bozzani et al, Cui et al, Griffin et al, Klok et al, Leonard-Lorant et al, Llitjos et al, Poissy et al. There was one retrospective cohort study, Lodigiani et al, and one prospective cohort study, Helms et al [...]

  • Open Access English

    Overview: This document and risk assessment tool provides practical guidance and recommendations to support the special role of religious leaders, faith-based organizations, and faith communities in COVID-19 education, preparedness, and response.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    World Health Organization;

    The main aim of the national capacities review tool is to better understand existing capacities in the area of detection and response to a novel coronavirus (nCoV) that is zoonotic and causes respiratory disease. The tool was developed with other coronaviruses, such as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, in mind and in consultation with member states. This information will help national authorities to i) identify main gaps ii) perform risk assessments and iii) plan for additional investigations, response and control actions.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    World Health Organization;

    The purpose of this document is to offer guidance to Member States on quarantine measures for individuals in the context of COVID-19. It is intended for those responsible for establishing local or national policy for quarantine of individuals, and adherence to infection prevention and control measures.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access

    Sitio web ministerial que incluye una infografía con recomendaciones para viajeros antes de realizar el viaje, durante el viaje y la estadía y después del viaje a un país donde circula el virus.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    De Buck, Emmy et. al.;

    This Campbell Systematic Review examines the effectiveness of different approaches for promoting handwashing and sanitation behaviour change, and factors affecting implementation, in low and middle‐income countries. The review summarises evidence from 42 impact evaluations, and from 28 qualitative studies. Community‐based approaches which include a sanitation component can increase handwashing with soap at key times; use of latrines and safe disposal of faeces; and reduce the frequency of open defecation. Social marketing seems less effective. The approach mainly shows an effect on sanitation outcomes when interventions combine handwashing and sanitation components. Sanitation and hygiene messaging with a focus on handwashing with soap has an effect after the intervention has ended, but there is little impact on sanitation outcomes. However, these effects are not sustainable in the long term. Using elements of psychosocial theory in a small‐scale handwashing promotion intervention, or adding theory‐based elements such as infrastructure promotion or public commitment to an existing promotional approach, seem promising for handwashing with soap. None of the approaches described have consistent effects on behavioural factors such as knowledge, skills and attitude. There are no consistent effects on health.

  • Open Access

    El presente informe está desarrollado a partir de las 28.830 notificaciones disponibles en el sistema de vigilancia epidemiológica EPIVIGILA, con un total de 2.373 casos confirmados, lo que representan una tasa de incidencia de 12,2 casos por cien mil habitantes.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;
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