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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rémy Bossu; Matthieu Landès; Fréderic Roussel; Robert Steed; Gilles Mazet-Roux; Stacey S Martin; Susan E. Hough;
    Country: Singapore
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The collection of earthquake testimonies (i.e., qualitative descriptions of felt shaking) is essential for macroseismic studies (i.e., studies gathering information on how strongly an earthquake was felt in different places), and when done rapidly and systematically, improves situational awareness and in turn can contribute to efficient emergency response. In this study, we present advances made in the collection of testimonies following earthquakes around the world using a thumbnail‐based questionnaire implemented on the European‐Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) smartphone app and its website compatible for mobile devices. In both instances, the questionnaire consists of a selection of thumbnails, each representing an intensity level of the European Macroseismic Scale 1998. We find that testimonies are collected faster, and in larger numbers, by way of thumbnail‐based questionnaires than by more traditional online questionnaires. Responses were received from all seismically active regions of our planet, suggesting that thumbnails overcome language barriers. We also observed that the app is not sufficient on its own, because the websites are the main source of testimonies when an earthquake strikes a region for the first time in a while; it is only for subsequent shocks that the app is widely used. Notably though, the speed of the collection of testimonies increases significantly when the app is used. We find that automated EMSC intensities as assigned by user‐specified thumbnails are, on average, well correlated with “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) responses and with the three independently and manually derived macroseismic datasets, but there is a tendency for EMSC to be biased low with respect to DYFI at moderate and large intensities. We address this by proposing a simple adjustment that will be verified in future earthquakes. NRF (Natl Research Foundation, S’pore) MOE (Min. of Education, S’pore) Published version

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chevrot, Sébastien; Sylvander, Matthieu; Diaz, Jordi; Martin, Roland; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Manatschal, Gianreto; Masini, Emmanuel; Calassou, Sylvain; Grimaud, Frank; Pauchet, Hélène; +1 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    We exploit the data from five seismic transects deployed across the Pyrenees to characterize the deep architecture of this collisional orogen. We map the main seismic interfaces beneath each transect by depth migration of P-to-S converted phases. The migrated sections, combined with the results of recent tomographic studies and with maps of Bouguer and isostatic anomalies, provide a coherent crustal-scale picture of the belt. In the Western Pyrenees, beneath the North Pyrenean Zone, a continuous band of high density/velocity material is found at a very shallow level (~10 km) beneath the Mauleon basin and near Saint-Gaudens. In the Western Pyrenees, we also find evidence for northward continental subduction of Iberian crust, down to 50–70 km depth. In the Eastern Pyrenees, these main structural features are not observed. The boundary between these two domains is near longitude 1.3 °E, where geological field studies document a major change in the structure of the Cretaceous rift system, and possibly a shift of its polarity, suggesting that the deep orogenic architecture of the Pyrenees is largely controlled by structural inheritance. The PYROPE (Pyrenean Observational Portable Experiment) project was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) Blanc Programme (project PYROPE, ANR-09- BLAN-0229). We also acknowledge SISMOB, the French seismic mobile pool (a component of the RESIF consortium - http://seismology.resif.fr), for providing us with the seismological instrumentation for the temporary deployments. Field work has been also partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through Project MISTERIOS (CGL2013-48601-C2-2-R). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Abraham B. Alemayehu; Laura J. McCormick; Kevin J. Gagnon; Sergey M. Borisov; Abhik Ghosh;
    Publisher: American Chemical Society
    Countries: Norway, United States
    Project: EC | EPOS (262229)

    With permission from Alemayehu, A.B., McCormick, L.J.M., Gagnon, K.J., Borisov, S.M. & Ghosh, A. (2018). Stable Platinum(IV) Corroles: Synthesis, Molecular Structure, and Room-Temperature Near-IR Phosphorescence. ACS Omega, 3(8), 9360-9368. Copyright 2018 American Chemical Society. Source at https://doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.8b01149. A series of stable Pt(IV) corrole complexes with the general formula PtIV[TpXPC](m/p-C6H4CN)(py), where TpXPC3– is the trianion of a tris(p-X-phenyl)corrole and X = CF3, H, and CH3, has been synthesized, affording key physicochemical data on a rare and elusive class of metallocorroles. Single-crystal X-ray structures of two of the complexes revealed very short equatorial Pt–N distances of 1.94–1.97 Å, an axial Pt–C distance of ∼2.03 Å, and an axial Pt–N distance of ∼2.22 Å. The complexes exhibit Soret maxima at ∼430 nm, which are essentially independent of the meso-aryl para substituents, and strong Q bands with the most intense peak at 595–599 nm. The substituent-independent Soret maxima are consistent with an innocent PtIV–corrole3– description for the complexes. The low reduction potentials (−1.45 ± 0.08 V vs saturated calomel reference electrode) also support a highly stable Pt(IV) ground state as opposed to a noninnocent corrole•2– description. The reductions, however, are irreversible, which suggests that they involve concomitant cleavage of the Pt–aryl bond. Unlike Pt(IV) porphyrins, two of the complexes, PtIV[TpXPC](m-C6H4CN)(py) (X = CF3 and CH3), were found to exhibit room-temperature near-IR phosphorescence with emission maxima at 813 and 826 nm, respectively. The quantum yield of ∼0.3% is comparable to those observed for six-coordinate Ir(III) corroles.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    G. Chouliaras; Nikolaos S. Melis; George Drakatos; Konstantinos Makropoulos;
    Project: EC | EPOS (262229)

    International audience; The seismological network of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) has systematically improved the detection capabilities in the Southeastern Mediterranean, by the continuous expansion and upgrading of the seismic stations and improvements in the operating and reporting procedures. As aresult of these improvements, the number of detected events of smaller magnitudes has increased and today a homogeneous magnitude is determined and disseminated towards the scientific community.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Freda, Carmela; Giardini, Domenico; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kohler, Elisabeth; Kontkanen, Pirjo; Lauterjung, Jörn; Pedersen, Helle; +2 more
    Publisher: ETH Zurich
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    EPOS – the European Plate Observing System – is the ESFRI infrastructure serving the need of the solid Earth science community at large. The EPOS mission is to create a single sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework. Thematic Core Services (TCS) and Integrated Core Services (Central Hub, ICS-C and Distributed, ICS-D) are key elements, together with NRIs (National Research Infrastructures), in the EPOS architecture. Following the preparatory phase, EPOS has initiated formal steps to adopt an ERIC legal framework (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). The statutory seat of EPOS will be in Rome, Italy, while the ICS-C will be jointly operated by France, UK and Denmark. The TCS planned so far cover: seismology, near-fault observatories, GNSS data and products, volcano observations, satellite data, geomagnetic observations, anthropogenic hazards, geological information modelling, multiscale laboratories and geo-energy test beds for low carbon energy. In the ERIC process, EPOS and all its services must achieve sustainability from a legal, governance, financial, and technical point of view, as well as full harmonization with national infrastructure roadmaps. As EPOS is a distributed infrastructure, the TCSs have to be linked to the future EPOS ERIC from legal and governance perspectives. For this purpose the TCSs have started to organize themselves as consortia and negotiate agreements to define the roles of the different actors in the consortium as well as their commitment to contribute to the EPOS activities. The link to the EPOS ERIC shall be made by service agreements of dedicated Service Providers. A common EPOS data policy has also been developed, based on the general principles of Open Access and paying careful attention to licensing issues, quality control, and intellectual property rights, which shall apply to the data, data products, software and services (DDSS) accessible through EPOS. From a financial standpoint, EPOS elaborated common guidelines for all institutions providing services, and selected a costing model and funding approach which foresees a mixed support of the services via national contributions and ERIC membership fees. In the EPOS multi-disciplinary environment, harmonization and integration are required at different levels and with a variety of different stakeholders; to this purpose, a Service Coordination Board (SCB) and technical Harmonization Groups (HGs) were established to develop the EPOS metadata standards with the EPOS Integrated Central Services, and to harmonize data and product standards with other projects at European and international level, including e.g. ENVRI+, EUDAT and EarthCube (US). Geophysical Research Abstracts, 19 ISSN:1607-7962 ISSN:1029-7006

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Michèle Marti; Florian Haslinger; Peppoloni Silvia; Di Capua Giuseppe; Helen Glaves; Irina Dallo;
    Publisher: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia
    Countries: Switzerland, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    Novel measurement technologies, additional sensors and increasing data processing capacities offer new opportunities to answer some of the currently most pressing societal and environmental questions. They also contribute to the fact that the available data volume will continue to increase. At the same time, the requirements for those providing such data rise and the needs of users to access it. The EPOS Delivery Framework aims to support this endeavour in the solid Earth domain by providing access to data, products, and services supporting multidisciplinary analyses for a wide range of users. Based on this example, we look at the most pressing issues from when data, products, and services are made accessible, to access principles, ethical issues related to its collection and use as well as with respect to their promotion. Among many peculiarities, we shed light on a common component that affects all fields equally: change. Not only will the amount and type of data, products, and services change, but so will the societal expectations and providers capabilities. Annals of Geophysics, 65 (2) ISSN:1593-5213

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Louis De Barros; Frédéric Cappa; Yves Guglielmi; Laure Duboeuf; Jean-Robert Grasso;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United States, France
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | SERA (730900), ANR | HYDROSEIS (ANR-13-JS06-0004)

    AbstractThe ability to predict the magnitude of an earthquake caused by deep fluid injections is an important factor for assessing the safety of the reservoir storage and the seismic hazard. Here, we propose a new approach to evaluate the seismic energy released during fluid injection by integrating injection parameters, induced aseismic deformation, and the distance of earthquake sources from injection. We use data from ten injection experiments performed at a decameter scale into fault zones in limestone and shale formations. We observe that the seismic energy and the hydraulic energy similarly depend on the injected fluid volume (V), as they both scale as V3/2. They show, however, a large discrepancy, partly related to a large aseismic deformation. Therefore, to accurately predict the released seismic energy, aseismic deformation should be considered in the budget through the residual deformation measured at the injection. Alternatively, the minimal hypocentral distance from injection points and the critical fluid pressure for fault reactivation can be used for a better prediction of the seismic moment in the total compilation of earthquakes observed during these experiments. Complementary to the prediction based only on the injected fluid volume, our approach opens the possibility of using alternative monitoring parameters to improve traffic-light protocols for induced earthquakes and the regulation of operational injection activities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudio De Luca; Francesco Casu; Michele Manunta; Giovanni Onorato; Riccardo Lanari;
    Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,, New York, N.Y. , Stati Uniti d'America
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    In a recent publication, Ansari et al. (2021) claimed (see, in particular, the Discussion and Recommendation Section in their article) that the advanced differential SAR interferometry (InSAR) algorithms for surface deformation retrieval, based on the small baseline approach, are affected by systematic biases in the generated InSAR products. Therefore, to avoid such biases, they recommended a strategy primarily focused on excluding ``the short temporal baseline interferograms and using long baselines to decrease the overall phase errors.'' In particular, among various techniques, Ansari et al. (2021) identified the solution presented by Manunta et al. (2019) as a small baseline advanced InSAR processing approach where the presence of the above-mentioned biases (referred to as a fading signal) compromises the accuracy of the retrieved InSAR deformation products. We show that the claim of Ansari et al. (2021) is not correct (at least) for what concerns the mentioned approach discussed by Manunta et al. (2019). In particular, by processing the Sentinel-1 dataset relevant to the same area in Sicily (southern Italy) investigated by Ansari et al. (2021), we demonstrate that the generated InSAR products do not show any significant bias.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Teixidó Ullod, Teresa;
    Publisher: MDPI
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    The critical zone (CZ) represents the most-shallow subsurface, where the bio-, hydro-, and geospheres interact with anthropogenic activity. To characterize the thickness and lateral variations of the CZ, here we focus on the Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ), one of the most tectonically active regions in the Iberian Peninsula. Within the EBSZ, the Guadalentín Depression is a highly populated area with intensive agricultural activity, where the characterization of the CZ would provide valuable assets for land use management and seismic hazard assessments. To achieve this, we have conducted an interdisciplinary geophysical study along the eastern border of the Guadalentín Depression to characterize the CZ and the architecture of the shallow subsurface. The datasets used include Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), first-arrival travel time seismic tomography, and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). The geophysical datasets combined help to constrain the high-resolution structure of the subsurface and image active fault systems along four transects. The resulting geophysical models have allowed us to interpret the first ~150 m of the subsurface and has revealed: (i) the variable thickness of the CZ; (ii) the CZ relationship between the fault zone and topographic slope; and (iii) the differences in CZ thickness associated with the geological units. Our results provide a method for studying the shallow subsurface of active faults, complementing previous geological models based on paleo-seismological trenches, and can be used to improve the CZ assessment of tectonically active regions. The geophysical data used in this study consisted of two datasets, namely electrical resistivity data and seismic data. Resistivity data were obtained from the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method, while seismic data (Vp and Vs) were obtained from the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and P-wave travel time tomography. The resistivity and seismic data used in this study were acquired within the INTER GEO research project, which was funded by the Spanish national research program. Funding: J.A. is funded by grant IJC2018-036074-I and by MCIN/AEI /10.13039/501100011033. I.P. is funded by the Spanish Government and the Universidad de Salamanca (Beatriz Galindo grant BEGAL 18/00090). This project was funded by Grant 2017SGR1022 (GREG) from the Generalitat de Catalunya (AGAUR); EU (H2020) 871121 (EPOS-SP); and EIT-RawMaterias 17024 from the European Institute of Technology (EIT) (SIT4ME). Horizon 2020 Framework Programme 871121, EIT-RawMaterias 17024 Agència de Gestió d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca Universidad de Salamanca 2017SGR1022, BEGAL 18/00090 European Institute of Technology SIT4ME Spanish national research program Agencia Estatal de Investigación Generalitat de Catalunya European Commission MCIN

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Florian Haslinger; Roberto Basili; Rémy Bossu; Carlo Cauzzi; Fabrice Cotton; Helen Crowley; Susana Custodio; Laurentiu Danciu; Mario Locati; Alberto Michelini; +3 more
    Publisher: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia
    Countries: Germany, Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    In this article we describe EPOS Seismology, the Thematic Core Service consortium for the seismology domain within the European Plate Observing System infrastructure. EPOS Seismology was developed alongside the build-up of EPOS during the last decade, in close collaboration between the existing pan-European seismological initiatives ORFEUS (Observatories and Research Facilities for European Seismology), EMSC (Euro-Mediterranean Seismological Center) and EFEHR (European Facilities for Earthquake Hazard and Risk) and their respective communities. It provides on one hand a governance framework that allows a well-coordinated interaction of the seismological community services with EPOS and its bodies, and on the other hand it strengthens the coordination among the already existing seismological initiatives with regard to data, products and service provisioning and further development. Within the EPOS Delivery Framework, ORFEUS, EMSC and EFEHR provide a wide range of services that allow open access to a vast amount of seismological data and products, following and implementing the FAIR principles and supporting open science. Services include access to raw seismic waveforms of thousands of stations together with relevant station and data quality information, parametric earthquake information of recent and historical earthquakes together with advanced event-specific products like moment tensors or source models and further ancillary services, and comprehensive seismic hazard and risk information, covering latest European scale models and their underlying data. The services continue to be available on the well-established domain-specific platforms and websites, and are also consecutively integrated with the interoperable central EPOS data infrastructure. EPOS Seismology and its participating organizations provide a consistent framework for the future development of these services and their operation as EPOS services, closely coordinated also with other international seismological initiatives, and is well set to represent the European seismological research infrastructures and their stakeholders within EPOS. Annals of Geophysics, 65 (2) ISSN:1593-5213

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rémy Bossu; Matthieu Landès; Fréderic Roussel; Robert Steed; Gilles Mazet-Roux; Stacey S Martin; Susan E. Hough;
    Country: Singapore
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The collection of earthquake testimonies (i.e., qualitative descriptions of felt shaking) is essential for macroseismic studies (i.e., studies gathering information on how strongly an earthquake was felt in different places), and when done rapidly and systematically, improves situational awareness and in turn can contribute to efficient emergency response. In this study, we present advances made in the collection of testimonies following earthquakes around the world using a thumbnail‐based questionnaire implemented on the European‐Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) smartphone app and its website compatible for mobile devices. In both instances, the questionnaire consists of a selection of thumbnails, each representing an intensity level of the European Macroseismic Scale 1998. We find that testimonies are collected faster, and in larger numbers, by way of thumbnail‐based questionnaires than by more traditional online questionnaires. Responses were received from all seismically active regions of our planet, suggesting that thumbnails overcome language barriers. We also observed that the app is not sufficient on its own, because the websites are the main source of testimonies when an earthquake strikes a region for the first time in a while; it is only for subsequent shocks that the app is widely used. Notably though, the speed of the collection of testimonies increases significantly when the app is used. We find that automated EMSC intensities as assigned by user‐specified thumbnails are, on average, well correlated with “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) responses and with the three independently and manually derived macroseismic datasets, but there is a tendency for EMSC to be biased low with respect to DYFI at moderate and large intensities. We address this by proposing a simple adjustment that will be verified in future earthquakes. NRF (Natl Research Foundation, S’pore) MOE (Min. of Education, S’pore) Published version

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chevrot, Sébastien; Sylvander, Matthieu; Diaz, Jordi; Martin, Roland; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Manatschal, Gianreto; Masini, Emmanuel; Calassou, Sylvain; Grimaud, Frank; Pauchet, Hélène; +1 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    We exploit the data from five seismic transects deployed across the Pyrenees to characterize the deep architecture of this collisional orogen. We map the main seismic interfaces beneath each transect by depth migration of P-to-S converted phases. The migrated sections, combined with the results of recent tomographic studies and with maps of Bouguer and isostatic anomalies, provide a coherent crustal-scale picture of the belt. In the Western Pyrenees, beneath the North Pyrenean Zone, a continuous band of high density/velocity material is found at a very shallow level (~10 km) beneath the Mauleon basin and near Saint-Gaudens. In the Western Pyrenees, we also find evidence for northward continental subduction of Iberian crust, down to 50–70 km depth. In the Eastern Pyrenees, these main structural features are not observed. The boundary between these two domains is near longitude 1.3 °E, where geological field studies document a major change in the structure of the Cretaceous rift system, and possibly a shift of its polarity, suggesting that the deep orogenic architecture of the Pyrenees is largely controlled by structural inheritance. The PYROPE (Pyrenean Observational Portable Experiment) project was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) Blanc Programme (project PYROPE, ANR-09- BLAN-0229). We also acknowledge SISMOB, the French seismic mobile pool (a component of the RESIF consortium - http://seismology.resif.fr), for providing us with the seismological instrumentation for the temporary deployments. Field work has been also partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through Project MISTERIOS (CGL2013-48601-C2-2-R). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Abraham B. Alemayehu; Laura J. McCormick; Kevin J. Gagnon; Sergey M. Borisov; Abhik Ghosh;
    Publisher: American Chemical Society
    Countries: Norway, United States
    Project: EC | EPOS (262229)

    With permission from Alemayehu, A.B., McCormick, L.J.M., Gagnon, K.J., Borisov, S.M. & Ghosh, A. (2018). Stable Platinum(IV) Corroles: Synthesis, Molecular Structure, and Room-Temperature Near-IR Phosphorescence. ACS Omega, 3(8), 9360-9368. Copyright 2018 American Chemical Society. Source at https://doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.8b01149. A series of stable Pt(IV) corrole complexes with the general formula PtIV[TpXPC](m/p-C6H4CN)(py), where TpXPC3– is the trianion of a tris(p-X-phenyl)corrole and X = CF3, H, and CH3, has been synthesized, affording key physicochemical data on a rare and elusive class of metallocorroles. Single-crystal X-ray structures of two of the complexes revealed very short equatorial Pt–N distances of 1.94–1.97 Å, an axial Pt–C distance of ∼2.03 Å, and an axial Pt–N distance of ∼2.22 Å. The complexes exhibit Soret maxima at ∼430 nm, which are essentially independent of the meso-aryl para substituents, and strong Q bands with the most intense peak at 595–599 nm. The substituent-independent Soret maxima are consistent with an innocent PtIV–corrole3– description for the complexes. The low reduction potentials (−1.45 ± 0.08 V vs saturated calomel reference electrode) also support a highly stable Pt(IV) ground state as opposed to a noninnocent corrole•2– description. The reductions, however, are irreversible, which suggests that they involve concomitant cleavage of the Pt–aryl bond. Unlike Pt(IV) porphyrins, two of the complexes, PtIV[TpXPC](m-C6H4CN)(py) (X = CF3 and CH3), were found to exhibit room-temperature near-IR phosphorescence with emission maxima at 813 and 826 nm, respectively. The quantum yield of ∼0.3% is comparable to those observed for six-coordinate Ir(III) corroles.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    G. Chouliaras; Nikolaos S. Melis; George Drakatos; Konstantinos Makropoulos;
    Project: EC | EPOS (262229)

    International audience; The seismological network of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) has systematically improved the detection capabilities in the Southeastern Mediterranean, by the continuous expansion and upgrading of the seismic stations and improvements in the operating and reporting procedures. As aresult of these improvements, the number of detected events of smaller magnitudes has increased and today a homogeneous magnitude is determined and disseminated towards the scientific community.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Freda, Carmela; Giardini, Domenico; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kohler, Elisabeth; Kontkanen, Pirjo; Lauterjung, Jörn; Pedersen, Helle; +2 more
    Publisher: ETH Zurich
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    EPOS – the European Plate Observing System – is the ESFRI infrastructure serving the need of the solid Earth science community at large. The EPOS mission is to create a single sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework. Thematic Core Services (TCS) and Integrated Core Services (Central Hub, ICS-C and Distributed, ICS-D) are key elements, together with NRIs (National Research Infrastructures), in the EPOS architecture. Following the preparatory phase, EPOS has initiated formal steps to adopt an ERIC legal framework (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). The statutory seat of EPOS will be in Rome, Italy, while the ICS-C will be jointly operated by France, UK and Denmark. The TCS planned so far cover: seismology, near-fault observatories, GNSS data and products, volcano observations, satellite data, geomagnetic observations, anthropogenic hazards, geological information modelling, multiscale laboratories and geo-energy test beds for low carbon energy. In the ERIC process, EPOS and all its services must achieve sustainability from a legal, governance, financial, and technical point of view, as well as full harmonization with national infrastructure roadmaps. As EPOS is a distributed infrastructure, the TCSs have to be linked to the future EPOS ERIC from legal and governance perspectives. For this purpose the TCSs have started to organize themselves as consortia and negotiate agreements to define the roles of the different actors in the consortium as well as their commitment to contribute to the EPOS activities. The link to the EPOS ERIC shall be made by service agreements of dedicated Service Providers. A common EPOS data policy has also been developed, based on the general principles of Open Access and paying careful attention to licensing issues, quality control, and intellectual property rights, which shall apply to the data, data products, software and services (DDSS) accessible through EPOS. From a financial standpoint, EPOS elaborated common guidelines for all institutions providing services, and selected a costing model and funding approach which foresees a mixed support of the services via national contributions and ERIC membership fees. In the EPOS multi-disciplinary environment, harmonization and integration are required at different levels and with a variety of different stakeholders; to this purpose, a Service Coordination Board (SCB) and technical Harmonization Groups (HGs) were established to develop the EPOS metadata standards with the EPOS Integrated Central Services, and to harmonize data and product standards with other projects at European and international level, including e.g. ENVRI+, EUDAT and EarthCube (US). Geophysical Research Abstracts, 19 ISSN:1607-7962 ISSN:1029-7006

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Michèle Marti; Florian Haslinger; Peppoloni Silvia; Di Capua Giuseppe; Helen Glaves; Irina Dallo;
    Publisher: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia
    Countries: Switzerland, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    Novel measurement technologies, additional sensors and increasing data processing capacities offer new opportunities to answer some of the currently most pressing societal and environmental questions. They also contribute to the fact that the available data volume will continue to increase. At the same time, the requirements for those providing such data rise and the needs of users to access it. The EPOS Delivery Framework aims to support this endeavour in the solid Earth domain by providing access to data, products, and services supporting multidisciplinary analyses for a wide range of users. Based on this example, we look at the most pressing issues from when data, products, and services are made accessible, to access principles, ethical issues related to its collection and use as well as with respect to their promotion. Among many peculiarities, we shed light on a common component that affects all fields equally: change. Not only will the amount and type of data, products, and services change, but so will the societal expectations and providers capabilities. Annals of Geophysics, 65 (2) ISSN:1593-5213

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Louis De Barros; Frédéric Cappa; Yves Guglielmi; Laure Duboeuf; Jean-Robert Grasso;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United States, France
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | SERA (730900), ANR | HYDROSEIS (ANR-13-JS06-0004)

    AbstractThe ability to predict the magnitude of an earthquake caused by deep fluid injections is an important factor for assessing the safety of the reservoir storage and the seismic hazard. Here, we propose a new approach to evaluate the seismic energy released during fluid injection by integrating injection parameters, induced aseismic deformation, and the distance of earthquake sources from injection. We use data from ten injection experiments performed at a decameter scale into fault zones in limestone and shale formations. We observe that the seismic energy and the hydraulic energy similarly depend on the injected fluid volume (V), as they both scale as V3/2. They show, however, a large discrepancy, partly related to a large aseismic deformation. Therefore, to accurately predict the released seismic energy, aseismic deformation should be considered in the budget through the residual deformation measured at the injection. Alternatively, the minimal hypocentral distance from injection points and the critical fluid pressure for fault reactivation can be used for a better prediction of the seismic moment in the total compilation of earthquakes observed during these experiments. Complementary to the prediction based only on the injected fluid volume, our approach opens the possibility of using alternative monitoring parameters to improve traffic-light protocols for induced earthquakes and the regulation of operational injection activities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudio De Luca; Francesco Casu; Michele Manunta; Giovanni Onorato; Riccardo Lanari;
    Publisher: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,, New York, N.Y. , Stati Uniti d'America
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    In a recent publication, Ansari et al. (2021) claimed (see, in particular, the Discussion and Recommendation Section in their article) that the advanced differential SAR interferometry (InSAR) algorithms for surface deformation retrieval, based on the small baseline approach, are affected by systematic biases in the generated InSAR products. Therefore, to avoid such biases, they recommended a strategy primarily focused on excluding ``the short temporal baseline interferograms and using long baselines to decrease the overall phase errors.'' In particular, among various techniques, Ansari et al. (2021) identified the solution presented by Manunta et al. (2019) as a small baseline advanced InSAR processing approach where the presence of the above-mentioned biases (referred to as a fading signal) compromises the accuracy of the retrieved InSAR deformation products. We show that the claim of Ansari et al. (2021) is not correct (at least) for what concerns the mentioned approach discussed by Manunta et al. (2019). In particular, by processing the Sentinel-1 dataset relevant to the same area in Sicily (southern Italy) investigated by Ansari et al. (2021), we demonstrate that the generated InSAR products do not show any significant bias.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Teixidó Ullod, Teresa;
    Publisher: MDPI
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    The critical zone (CZ) represents the most-shallow subsurface, where the bio-, hydro-, and geospheres interact with anthropogenic activity. To characterize the thickness and lateral variations of the CZ, here we focus on the Eastern Betic Shear Zone (EBSZ), one of the most tectonically active regions in the Iberian Peninsula. Within the EBSZ, the Guadalentín Depression is a highly populated area with intensive agricultural activity, where the characterization of the CZ would provide valuable assets for land use management and seismic hazard assessments. To achieve this, we have conducted an interdisciplinary geophysical study along the eastern border of the Guadalentín Depression to characterize the CZ and the architecture of the shallow subsurface. The datasets used include Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), first-arrival travel time seismic tomography, and multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). The geophysical datasets combined help to constrain the high-resolution structure of the subsurface and image active fault systems along four transects. The resulting geophysical models have allowed us to interpret the first ~150 m of the subsurface and has revealed: (i) the variable thickness of the CZ; (ii) the CZ relationship between the fault zone and topographic slope; and (iii) the differences in CZ thickness associated with the geological units. Our results provide a method for studying the shallow subsurface of active faults, complementing previous geological models based on paleo-seismological trenches, and can be used to improve the CZ assessment of tectonically active regions. The geophysical data used in this study consisted of two datasets, namely electrical resistivity data and seismic data. Resistivity data were obtained from the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method, while seismic data (Vp and Vs) were obtained from the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and P-wave travel time tomography. The resistivity and seismic data used in this study were acquired within the INTER GEO research project, which was funded by the Spanish national research program. Funding: J.A. is funded by grant IJC2018-036074-I and by MCIN/AEI /10.13039/501100011033. I.P. is funded by the Spanish Government and the Universidad de Salamanca (Beatriz Galindo grant BEGAL 18/00090). This project was funded by Grant 2017SGR1022 (GREG) from the Generalitat de Catalunya (AGAUR); EU (H2020) 871121 (EPOS-SP); and EIT-RawMaterias 17024 from the European Institute of Technology (EIT) (SIT4ME). Horizon 2020 Framework Programme 871121, EIT-RawMaterias 17024 Agència de Gestió d'Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca Universidad de Salamanca 2017SGR1022, BEGAL 18/00090 European Institute of Technology SIT4ME Spanish national research program Agencia Estatal de Investigación Generalitat de Catalunya European Commission MCIN

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Florian Haslinger; Roberto Basili; Rémy Bossu; Carlo Cauzzi; Fabrice Cotton; Helen Crowley; Susana Custodio; Laurentiu Danciu; Mario Locati; Alberto Michelini; +3 more
    Publisher: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia
    Countries: Germany, Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    In this article we describe EPOS Seismology, the Thematic Core Service consortium for the seismology domain within the European Plate Observing System infrastructure. EPOS Seismology was developed alongside the build-up of EPOS during the last decade, in close collaboration between the existing pan-European seismological initiatives ORFEUS (Observatories and Research Facilities for European Seismology), EMSC (Euro-Mediterranean Seismological Center) and EFEHR (European Facilities for Earthquake Hazard and Risk) and their respective communities. It provides on one hand a governance framework that allows a well-coordinated interaction of the seismological community services with EPOS and its bodies, and on the other hand it strengthens the coordination among the already existing seismological initiatives with regard to data, products and service provisioning and further development. Within the EPOS Delivery Framework, ORFEUS, EMSC and EFEHR provide a wide range of services that allow open access to a vast amount of seismological data and products, following and implementing the FAIR principles and supporting open science. Services include access to raw seismic waveforms of thousands of stations together with relevant station and data quality information, parametric earthquake information of recent and historical earthquakes together with advanced event-specific products like moment tensors or source models and further ancillary services, and comprehensive seismic hazard and risk information, covering latest European scale models and their underlying data. The services continue to be available on the well-established domain-specific platforms and websites, and are also consecutively integrated with the interoperable central EPOS data infrastructure. EPOS Seismology and its participating organizations provide a consistent framework for the future development of these services and their operation as EPOS services, closely coordinated also with other international seismological initiatives, and is well set to represent the European seismological research infrastructures and their stakeholders within EPOS. Annals of Geophysics, 65 (2) ISSN:1593-5213

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