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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rémy Bossu; Matthieu Landès; Fréderic Roussel; Robert Steed; Gilles Mazet-Roux; Stacey S Martin; Susan E. Hough;
    Country: Singapore
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The collection of earthquake testimonies (i.e., qualitative descriptions of felt shaking) is essential for macroseismic studies (i.e., studies gathering information on how strongly an earthquake was felt in different places), and when done rapidly and systematically, improves situational awareness and in turn can contribute to efficient emergency response. In this study, we present advances made in the collection of testimonies following earthquakes around the world using a thumbnail‐based questionnaire implemented on the European‐Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) smartphone app and its website compatible for mobile devices. In both instances, the questionnaire consists of a selection of thumbnails, each representing an intensity level of the European Macroseismic Scale 1998. We find that testimonies are collected faster, and in larger numbers, by way of thumbnail‐based questionnaires than by more traditional online questionnaires. Responses were received from all seismically active regions of our planet, suggesting that thumbnails overcome language barriers. We also observed that the app is not sufficient on its own, because the websites are the main source of testimonies when an earthquake strikes a region for the first time in a while; it is only for subsequent shocks that the app is widely used. Notably though, the speed of the collection of testimonies increases significantly when the app is used. We find that automated EMSC intensities as assigned by user‐specified thumbnails are, on average, well correlated with “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) responses and with the three independently and manually derived macroseismic datasets, but there is a tendency for EMSC to be biased low with respect to DYFI at moderate and large intensities. We address this by proposing a simple adjustment that will be verified in future earthquakes. NRF (Natl Research Foundation, S’pore) MOE (Min. of Education, S’pore) Published version

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chevrot, Sébastien; Sylvander, Matthieu; Diaz, Jordi; Martin, Roland; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Manatschal, Gianreto; Masini, Emmanuel; Calassou, Sylvain; Grimaud, Frank; Pauchet, Hélène; +1 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    We exploit the data from five seismic transects deployed across the Pyrenees to characterize the deep architecture of this collisional orogen. We map the main seismic interfaces beneath each transect by depth migration of P-to-S converted phases. The migrated sections, combined with the results of recent tomographic studies and with maps of Bouguer and isostatic anomalies, provide a coherent crustal-scale picture of the belt. In the Western Pyrenees, beneath the North Pyrenean Zone, a continuous band of high density/velocity material is found at a very shallow level (~10 km) beneath the Mauleon basin and near Saint-Gaudens. In the Western Pyrenees, we also find evidence for northward continental subduction of Iberian crust, down to 50–70 km depth. In the Eastern Pyrenees, these main structural features are not observed. The boundary between these two domains is near longitude 1.3 °E, where geological field studies document a major change in the structure of the Cretaceous rift system, and possibly a shift of its polarity, suggesting that the deep orogenic architecture of the Pyrenees is largely controlled by structural inheritance. The PYROPE (Pyrenean Observational Portable Experiment) project was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) Blanc Programme (project PYROPE, ANR-09- BLAN-0229). We also acknowledge SISMOB, the French seismic mobile pool (a component of the RESIF consortium - http://seismology.resif.fr), for providing us with the seismological instrumentation for the temporary deployments. Field work has been also partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through Project MISTERIOS (CGL2013-48601-C2-2-R). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Abraham B. Alemayehu; Laura J. McCormick; Kevin J. Gagnon; Sergey M. Borisov; Abhik Ghosh;
    Publisher: American Chemical Society
    Countries: Norway, United States
    Project: EC | EPOS (262229)

    With permission from Alemayehu, A.B., McCormick, L.J.M., Gagnon, K.J., Borisov, S.M. & Ghosh, A. (2018). Stable Platinum(IV) Corroles: Synthesis, Molecular Structure, and Room-Temperature Near-IR Phosphorescence. ACS Omega, 3(8), 9360-9368. Copyright 2018 American Chemical Society. Source at https://doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.8b01149. A series of stable Pt(IV) corrole complexes with the general formula PtIV[TpXPC](m/p-C6H4CN)(py), where TpXPC3– is the trianion of a tris(p-X-phenyl)corrole and X = CF3, H, and CH3, has been synthesized, affording key physicochemical data on a rare and elusive class of metallocorroles. Single-crystal X-ray structures of two of the complexes revealed very short equatorial Pt–N distances of 1.94–1.97 Å, an axial Pt–C distance of ∼2.03 Å, and an axial Pt–N distance of ∼2.22 Å. The complexes exhibit Soret maxima at ∼430 nm, which are essentially independent of the meso-aryl para substituents, and strong Q bands with the most intense peak at 595–599 nm. The substituent-independent Soret maxima are consistent with an innocent PtIV–corrole3– description for the complexes. The low reduction potentials (−1.45 ± 0.08 V vs saturated calomel reference electrode) also support a highly stable Pt(IV) ground state as opposed to a noninnocent corrole•2– description. The reductions, however, are irreversible, which suggests that they involve concomitant cleavage of the Pt–aryl bond. Unlike Pt(IV) porphyrins, two of the complexes, PtIV[TpXPC](m-C6H4CN)(py) (X = CF3 and CH3), were found to exhibit room-temperature near-IR phosphorescence with emission maxima at 813 and 826 nm, respectively. The quantum yield of ∼0.3% is comparable to those observed for six-coordinate Ir(III) corroles.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Fernando Monterroso (1; 2); Manuela Bonano (2; 3); Claudio de Luca (2); De Novellis Vincenzo (2); Riccardo Lanari (2); Michelle Manunta (2); Mariarosaria Manzo (2); Giovanni Onorato (2); +3 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    During the last decades, the availability of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite missions, such as the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT ones operating at C-band who have worked since 1992 to 2011, as well as the X-band COSMOSkyMed and TerraSAR-X constellations, up to the brand new Sentinel-1 mission, have strongly contributed to SAR data diffusion and popularity in the generation of different studies at different scales and in different research fields. One of the most popular SAR technique is the one referred to as Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR), which allows measuring with centimeter accuracy the Earth's surface deformation entity related to both natural and man-made hazards. Nowadays, with the increasing of SAR data availability provided by Sentinel-1 constellation of Copernicus European Program, which is composed by two twin satellites operating in C-band since 2014 and 2016, with a repeat pass of 6 days and with a global (i.e. worldwide) data acquisition policy, the SAR EO scenario is becoming more and more operational, thus mainly providing support for natural hazards monitoring. This allows, in theory, and disposing of sufficient computing power, the EO community to monitor, for instance, the deformation of every volcano or to obtain co-seismic displacement maps in a short time frame and anywhere in the world. Accordingly, in this work, we present a fully automatic and fast processing service for the generation of co-seismic displacement maps by using Sentinel-1 data. The implemented system is completely unsupervised and is triggered by the all significant (i.e. larger than a defined magnitude) seismic event registered by the online catalog as those provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology of Italy (INGV). The service has been specifically designed to operate for Civil Protection purposes. The generated DInSAR measurements are made available to the geoscience community through the EPOS Research Infrastructure and they will contribute to the creation of a global database of co-seismic displacement maps. Finally, it is worth noting that the developed system relies on widely common IT methods and protocols and is not specifically tied to a defined computing architecture, thus implying its portability, in view also of the European Commission Data and Information Access Services (DIAS) where satellite data (mainly Sentinel) and processing facilities are co-located to reduce the data transfer time during their processing.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    G. Chouliaras; Nikolaos S. Melis; George Drakatos; Konstantinos Makropoulos;
    Project: EC | EPOS (262229)

    International audience; The seismological network of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) has systematically improved the detection capabilities in the Southeastern Mediterranean, by the continuous expansion and upgrading of the seismic stations and improvements in the operating and reporting procedures. As aresult of these improvements, the number of detected events of smaller magnitudes has increased and today a homogeneous magnitude is determined and disseminated towards the scientific community.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Freda, Carmela; Giardini, Domenico; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kohler, Elisabeth; Kontkanen, Pirjo; Lauterjung, Jörn; Pedersen, Helle; +2 more
    Publisher: ETH Zurich
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    EPOS – the European Plate Observing System – is the ESFRI infrastructure serving the need of the solid Earth science community at large. The EPOS mission is to create a single sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework. Thematic Core Services (TCS) and Integrated Core Services (Central Hub, ICS-C and Distributed, ICS-D) are key elements, together with NRIs (National Research Infrastructures), in the EPOS architecture. Following the preparatory phase, EPOS has initiated formal steps to adopt an ERIC legal framework (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). The statutory seat of EPOS will be in Rome, Italy, while the ICS-C will be jointly operated by France, UK and Denmark. The TCS planned so far cover: seismology, near-fault observatories, GNSS data and products, volcano observations, satellite data, geomagnetic observations, anthropogenic hazards, geological information modelling, multiscale laboratories and geo-energy test beds for low carbon energy. In the ERIC process, EPOS and all its services must achieve sustainability from a legal, governance, financial, and technical point of view, as well as full harmonization with national infrastructure roadmaps. As EPOS is a distributed infrastructure, the TCSs have to be linked to the future EPOS ERIC from legal and governance perspectives. For this purpose the TCSs have started to organize themselves as consortia and negotiate agreements to define the roles of the different actors in the consortium as well as their commitment to contribute to the EPOS activities. The link to the EPOS ERIC shall be made by service agreements of dedicated Service Providers. A common EPOS data policy has also been developed, based on the general principles of Open Access and paying careful attention to licensing issues, quality control, and intellectual property rights, which shall apply to the data, data products, software and services (DDSS) accessible through EPOS. From a financial standpoint, EPOS elaborated common guidelines for all institutions providing services, and selected a costing model and funding approach which foresees a mixed support of the services via national contributions and ERIC membership fees. In the EPOS multi-disciplinary environment, harmonization and integration are required at different levels and with a variety of different stakeholders; to this purpose, a Service Coordination Board (SCB) and technical Harmonization Groups (HGs) were established to develop the EPOS metadata standards with the EPOS Integrated Central Services, and to harmonize data and product standards with other projects at European and international level, including e.g. ENVRI+, EUDAT and EarthCube (US). Geophysical Research Abstracts, 19 ISSN:1607-7962 ISSN:1029-7006

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    von der Linden, Jens; Kimblin, Clare; McKenna, Ian; Bagley, Skyler; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Houim, Ryan; Kueny, Christopher S.; Kuhl, Allen; Grote, Dave; Converse, Mark; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Background This data is camera images and nozzle pressure gauge voltage traces from rapid decompression shots at the LMU shock tube facility. This data is discussed in the "Materials and Methods" section of the paper "Standing Shock Prevents Propagation of Sparks in Supersonic Explosive Flows". Electric sparks and explosive flows have long been associated with each other. Flowing dust particles originate charge through contact and separate based on inertia, resulting in strong electric fields supporting sparks. These sparks can cause explosions in dusty environments, especially those rich in carbon, such as coal mines and grain elevators. Recent observations of explosive events in nature and decompression experiments indicate that supersonic flows of explosions may alter the electrical discharge process. Shocks may suppress parts of the hierarchy of the discharge phenomena, such as leaders. In our decompression experiments, a shock tube ejects a flow of gas and particles into an expansion chamber. We imaged an illuminated plume from the decompression of a mixture of argon and <100 mg of diamond particles and observe sparks occurring below the sharp boundary of a condensation cloud. We also performed hydrodynamics simulations of the decompression event that provide insight into the conditions supporting the observed behavior. Simulation results agree closely with the experimentally observed Mach disk shock shape and height. This represents direct evidence that the sparks are sculpted by the outflow. The spatial and temporal scale of the sparks transmit an impression of the shock tube flow, a connection that could enable novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible supersonic granular phenomena. Accessing Data The prefixes of the filenames correspond to the shot dates and times listed in table S1 of the paper. The "_camera.zip" files contains tiff images of the camera frames. The ".ixc" file in each zip lists camera settings in plain text. The ".dat" file contains the voltage measurement of the nozzle pressure gauge. Row 1 is the header, row 2 is the time in seconds, and row 3 is the voltage of the pressure gauge in Volts. The peak pressure in the header can be used to relate the voltage to pressure. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and Mission Support and Test Services, LLC, under Contract No. DE-NA0003624 with support from the Site-Directed Research and Development program, DOE/NV/03624--0956, and in part by the European Plate Observing Systems Transnational Access program of the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation program under grant N 676564. CC acknowledges the support from the DFG grant CI 25/2-1 and from the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska Curie grant nr. 705619. LLNL-MI-817289. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, complete- ness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific com- mercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. {"references": ["C. Cimarelli, M. Alatorre-Ibargengoitia, U. Kueppers, B. Scheu, D. Dingwell, Experimen- tal generation of volcanic lightning. Geology 42, 79\u201382 (2014)"]}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C.; Rejas, M.; Lobo, Agustín; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; +2 more
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    This dataset compiles SEM images, modelled isopach map and topographic profiles, and data of radiocarbon ages, parameters of Tephra2 and AshCalc codes of Holocene volcanic ashes of of Southern Puna and neighbouring areas (NW Argentina). SEM images detail differences among the Bolsón de Fiambalá, Cerro Blanco and Cueros de Purulla fallout ash deposits. Tephra2 code was used to simulate the ash fallout, and the AshCalc code to compare different methods for ash volume estimates associated with the 4.2 ka cal BP eruption of the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex. Topographic profiles are used to explain the secondary thickening of fallout ash deposits. Material suplementario (Figuras S1-S4 y Tablas S1-S4 del artículo Fernandez-Turiel, J.-L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C., Rejas, M.; Lobo, A.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; Gallardo, J.; Ratto, N. (2019). The large eruption 4.2 ka cal BP in Cerro Blanco, Central Volcanic Zone, Andes: Insights to the Holocene eruptive deposits in the southern Puna and adjacent regions. Estudios Geológicos 75(1): e088. https://doi.org/10.3989/egeol.43438.515 MINECO, CGL2011-23307, Proyecto QUECA Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Michèle Marti; Florian Haslinger; Peppoloni Silvia; Di Capua Giuseppe; Helen Glaves; Irina Dallo;
    Publisher: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia
    Countries: Switzerland, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    Novel measurement technologies, additional sensors and increasing data processing capacities offer new opportunities to answer some of the currently most pressing societal and environmental questions. They also contribute to the fact that the available data volume will continue to increase. At the same time, the requirements for those providing such data rise and the needs of users to access it. The EPOS Delivery Framework aims to support this endeavour in the solid Earth domain by providing access to data, products, and services supporting multidisciplinary analyses for a wide range of users. Based on this example, we look at the most pressing issues from when data, products, and services are made accessible, to access principles, ethical issues related to its collection and use as well as with respect to their promotion. Among many peculiarities, we shed light on a common component that affects all fields equally: change. Not only will the amount and type of data, products, and services change, but so will the societal expectations and providers capabilities. Annals of Geophysics, 65 (2) ISSN:1593-5213

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Louis De Barros; Frédéric Cappa; Yves Guglielmi; Laure Duboeuf; Jean-Robert Grasso;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United States, France
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | SERA (730900), ANR | HYDROSEIS (ANR-13-JS06-0004)

    AbstractThe ability to predict the magnitude of an earthquake caused by deep fluid injections is an important factor for assessing the safety of the reservoir storage and the seismic hazard. Here, we propose a new approach to evaluate the seismic energy released during fluid injection by integrating injection parameters, induced aseismic deformation, and the distance of earthquake sources from injection. We use data from ten injection experiments performed at a decameter scale into fault zones in limestone and shale formations. We observe that the seismic energy and the hydraulic energy similarly depend on the injected fluid volume (V), as they both scale as V3/2. They show, however, a large discrepancy, partly related to a large aseismic deformation. Therefore, to accurately predict the released seismic energy, aseismic deformation should be considered in the budget through the residual deformation measured at the injection. Alternatively, the minimal hypocentral distance from injection points and the critical fluid pressure for fault reactivation can be used for a better prediction of the seismic moment in the total compilation of earthquakes observed during these experiments. Complementary to the prediction based only on the injected fluid volume, our approach opens the possibility of using alternative monitoring parameters to improve traffic-light protocols for induced earthquakes and the regulation of operational injection activities.

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77 Research products, page 1 of 8
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rémy Bossu; Matthieu Landès; Fréderic Roussel; Robert Steed; Gilles Mazet-Roux; Stacey S Martin; Susan E. Hough;
    Country: Singapore
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The collection of earthquake testimonies (i.e., qualitative descriptions of felt shaking) is essential for macroseismic studies (i.e., studies gathering information on how strongly an earthquake was felt in different places), and when done rapidly and systematically, improves situational awareness and in turn can contribute to efficient emergency response. In this study, we present advances made in the collection of testimonies following earthquakes around the world using a thumbnail‐based questionnaire implemented on the European‐Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC) smartphone app and its website compatible for mobile devices. In both instances, the questionnaire consists of a selection of thumbnails, each representing an intensity level of the European Macroseismic Scale 1998. We find that testimonies are collected faster, and in larger numbers, by way of thumbnail‐based questionnaires than by more traditional online questionnaires. Responses were received from all seismically active regions of our planet, suggesting that thumbnails overcome language barriers. We also observed that the app is not sufficient on its own, because the websites are the main source of testimonies when an earthquake strikes a region for the first time in a while; it is only for subsequent shocks that the app is widely used. Notably though, the speed of the collection of testimonies increases significantly when the app is used. We find that automated EMSC intensities as assigned by user‐specified thumbnails are, on average, well correlated with “Did You Feel It?” (DYFI) responses and with the three independently and manually derived macroseismic datasets, but there is a tendency for EMSC to be biased low with respect to DYFI at moderate and large intensities. We address this by proposing a simple adjustment that will be verified in future earthquakes. NRF (Natl Research Foundation, S’pore) MOE (Min. of Education, S’pore) Published version

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chevrot, Sébastien; Sylvander, Matthieu; Diaz, Jordi; Martin, Roland; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Manatschal, Gianreto; Masini, Emmanuel; Calassou, Sylvain; Grimaud, Frank; Pauchet, Hélène; +1 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    We exploit the data from five seismic transects deployed across the Pyrenees to characterize the deep architecture of this collisional orogen. We map the main seismic interfaces beneath each transect by depth migration of P-to-S converted phases. The migrated sections, combined with the results of recent tomographic studies and with maps of Bouguer and isostatic anomalies, provide a coherent crustal-scale picture of the belt. In the Western Pyrenees, beneath the North Pyrenean Zone, a continuous band of high density/velocity material is found at a very shallow level (~10 km) beneath the Mauleon basin and near Saint-Gaudens. In the Western Pyrenees, we also find evidence for northward continental subduction of Iberian crust, down to 50–70 km depth. In the Eastern Pyrenees, these main structural features are not observed. The boundary between these two domains is near longitude 1.3 °E, where geological field studies document a major change in the structure of the Cretaceous rift system, and possibly a shift of its polarity, suggesting that the deep orogenic architecture of the Pyrenees is largely controlled by structural inheritance. The PYROPE (Pyrenean Observational Portable Experiment) project was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) Blanc Programme (project PYROPE, ANR-09- BLAN-0229). We also acknowledge SISMOB, the French seismic mobile pool (a component of the RESIF consortium - http://seismology.resif.fr), for providing us with the seismological instrumentation for the temporary deployments. Field work has been also partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through Project MISTERIOS (CGL2013-48601-C2-2-R). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Abraham B. Alemayehu; Laura J. McCormick; Kevin J. Gagnon; Sergey M. Borisov; Abhik Ghosh;
    Publisher: American Chemical Society
    Countries: Norway, United States
    Project: EC | EPOS (262229)

    With permission from Alemayehu, A.B., McCormick, L.J.M., Gagnon, K.J., Borisov, S.M. & Ghosh, A. (2018). Stable Platinum(IV) Corroles: Synthesis, Molecular Structure, and Room-Temperature Near-IR Phosphorescence. ACS Omega, 3(8), 9360-9368. Copyright 2018 American Chemical Society. Source at https://doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.8b01149. A series of stable Pt(IV) corrole complexes with the general formula PtIV[TpXPC](m/p-C6H4CN)(py), where TpXPC3– is the trianion of a tris(p-X-phenyl)corrole and X = CF3, H, and CH3, has been synthesized, affording key physicochemical data on a rare and elusive class of metallocorroles. Single-crystal X-ray structures of two of the complexes revealed very short equatorial Pt–N distances of 1.94–1.97 Å, an axial Pt–C distance of ∼2.03 Å, and an axial Pt–N distance of ∼2.22 Å. The complexes exhibit Soret maxima at ∼430 nm, which are essentially independent of the meso-aryl para substituents, and strong Q bands with the most intense peak at 595–599 nm. The substituent-independent Soret maxima are consistent with an innocent PtIV–corrole3– description for the complexes. The low reduction potentials (−1.45 ± 0.08 V vs saturated calomel reference electrode) also support a highly stable Pt(IV) ground state as opposed to a noninnocent corrole•2– description. The reductions, however, are irreversible, which suggests that they involve concomitant cleavage of the Pt–aryl bond. Unlike Pt(IV) porphyrins, two of the complexes, PtIV[TpXPC](m-C6H4CN)(py) (X = CF3 and CH3), were found to exhibit room-temperature near-IR phosphorescence with emission maxima at 813 and 826 nm, respectively. The quantum yield of ∼0.3% is comparable to those observed for six-coordinate Ir(III) corroles.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Fernando Monterroso (1; 2); Manuela Bonano (2; 3); Claudio de Luca (2); De Novellis Vincenzo (2); Riccardo Lanari (2); Michelle Manunta (2); Mariarosaria Manzo (2); Giovanni Onorato (2); +3 more
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    During the last decades, the availability of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite missions, such as the ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT ones operating at C-band who have worked since 1992 to 2011, as well as the X-band COSMOSkyMed and TerraSAR-X constellations, up to the brand new Sentinel-1 mission, have strongly contributed to SAR data diffusion and popularity in the generation of different studies at different scales and in different research fields. One of the most popular SAR technique is the one referred to as Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR), which allows measuring with centimeter accuracy the Earth's surface deformation entity related to both natural and man-made hazards. Nowadays, with the increasing of SAR data availability provided by Sentinel-1 constellation of Copernicus European Program, which is composed by two twin satellites operating in C-band since 2014 and 2016, with a repeat pass of 6 days and with a global (i.e. worldwide) data acquisition policy, the SAR EO scenario is becoming more and more operational, thus mainly providing support for natural hazards monitoring. This allows, in theory, and disposing of sufficient computing power, the EO community to monitor, for instance, the deformation of every volcano or to obtain co-seismic displacement maps in a short time frame and anywhere in the world. Accordingly, in this work, we present a fully automatic and fast processing service for the generation of co-seismic displacement maps by using Sentinel-1 data. The implemented system is completely unsupervised and is triggered by the all significant (i.e. larger than a defined magnitude) seismic event registered by the online catalog as those provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology of Italy (INGV). The service has been specifically designed to operate for Civil Protection purposes. The generated DInSAR measurements are made available to the geoscience community through the EPOS Research Infrastructure and they will contribute to the creation of a global database of co-seismic displacement maps. Finally, it is worth noting that the developed system relies on widely common IT methods and protocols and is not specifically tied to a defined computing architecture, thus implying its portability, in view also of the European Commission Data and Information Access Services (DIAS) where satellite data (mainly Sentinel) and processing facilities are co-located to reduce the data transfer time during their processing.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    G. Chouliaras; Nikolaos S. Melis; George Drakatos; Konstantinos Makropoulos;
    Project: EC | EPOS (262229)

    International audience; The seismological network of the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) has systematically improved the detection capabilities in the Southeastern Mediterranean, by the continuous expansion and upgrading of the seismic stations and improvements in the operating and reporting procedures. As aresult of these improvements, the number of detected events of smaller magnitudes has increased and today a homogeneous magnitude is determined and disseminated towards the scientific community.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atakan, Kuvvet; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Freda, Carmela; Giardini, Domenico; Hoffmann, Thomas; Kohler, Elisabeth; Kontkanen, Pirjo; Lauterjung, Jörn; Pedersen, Helle; +2 more
    Publisher: ETH Zurich
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    EPOS – the European Plate Observing System – is the ESFRI infrastructure serving the need of the solid Earth science community at large. The EPOS mission is to create a single sustainable, and distributed infrastructure that integrates the diverse European Research Infrastructures for solid Earth science under a common framework. Thematic Core Services (TCS) and Integrated Core Services (Central Hub, ICS-C and Distributed, ICS-D) are key elements, together with NRIs (National Research Infrastructures), in the EPOS architecture. Following the preparatory phase, EPOS has initiated formal steps to adopt an ERIC legal framework (European Research Infrastructure Consortium). The statutory seat of EPOS will be in Rome, Italy, while the ICS-C will be jointly operated by France, UK and Denmark. The TCS planned so far cover: seismology, near-fault observatories, GNSS data and products, volcano observations, satellite data, geomagnetic observations, anthropogenic hazards, geological information modelling, multiscale laboratories and geo-energy test beds for low carbon energy. In the ERIC process, EPOS and all its services must achieve sustainability from a legal, governance, financial, and technical point of view, as well as full harmonization with national infrastructure roadmaps. As EPOS is a distributed infrastructure, the TCSs have to be linked to the future EPOS ERIC from legal and governance perspectives. For this purpose the TCSs have started to organize themselves as consortia and negotiate agreements to define the roles of the different actors in the consortium as well as their commitment to contribute to the EPOS activities. The link to the EPOS ERIC shall be made by service agreements of dedicated Service Providers. A common EPOS data policy has also been developed, based on the general principles of Open Access and paying careful attention to licensing issues, quality control, and intellectual property rights, which shall apply to the data, data products, software and services (DDSS) accessible through EPOS. From a financial standpoint, EPOS elaborated common guidelines for all institutions providing services, and selected a costing model and funding approach which foresees a mixed support of the services via national contributions and ERIC membership fees. In the EPOS multi-disciplinary environment, harmonization and integration are required at different levels and with a variety of different stakeholders; to this purpose, a Service Coordination Board (SCB) and technical Harmonization Groups (HGs) were established to develop the EPOS metadata standards with the EPOS Integrated Central Services, and to harmonize data and product standards with other projects at European and international level, including e.g. ENVRI+, EUDAT and EarthCube (US). Geophysical Research Abstracts, 19 ISSN:1607-7962 ISSN:1029-7006

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    von der Linden, Jens; Kimblin, Clare; McKenna, Ian; Bagley, Skyler; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Houim, Ryan; Kueny, Christopher S.; Kuhl, Allen; Grote, Dave; Converse, Mark; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Background This data is camera images and nozzle pressure gauge voltage traces from rapid decompression shots at the LMU shock tube facility. This data is discussed in the "Materials and Methods" section of the paper "Standing Shock Prevents Propagation of Sparks in Supersonic Explosive Flows". Electric sparks and explosive flows have long been associated with each other. Flowing dust particles originate charge through contact and separate based on inertia, resulting in strong electric fields supporting sparks. These sparks can cause explosions in dusty environments, especially those rich in carbon, such as coal mines and grain elevators. Recent observations of explosive events in nature and decompression experiments indicate that supersonic flows of explosions may alter the electrical discharge process. Shocks may suppress parts of the hierarchy of the discharge phenomena, such as leaders. In our decompression experiments, a shock tube ejects a flow of gas and particles into an expansion chamber. We imaged an illuminated plume from the decompression of a mixture of argon and <100 mg of diamond particles and observe sparks occurring below the sharp boundary of a condensation cloud. We also performed hydrodynamics simulations of the decompression event that provide insight into the conditions supporting the observed behavior. Simulation results agree closely with the experimentally observed Mach disk shock shape and height. This represents direct evidence that the sparks are sculpted by the outflow. The spatial and temporal scale of the sparks transmit an impression of the shock tube flow, a connection that could enable novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible supersonic granular phenomena. Accessing Data The prefixes of the filenames correspond to the shot dates and times listed in table S1 of the paper. The "_camera.zip" files contains tiff images of the camera frames. The ".ixc" file in each zip lists camera settings in plain text. The ".dat" file contains the voltage measurement of the nozzle pressure gauge. Row 1 is the header, row 2 is the time in seconds, and row 3 is the voltage of the pressure gauge in Volts. The peak pressure in the header can be used to relate the voltage to pressure. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and Mission Support and Test Services, LLC, under Contract No. DE-NA0003624 with support from the Site-Directed Research and Development program, DOE/NV/03624--0956, and in part by the European Plate Observing Systems Transnational Access program of the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation program under grant N 676564. CC acknowledges the support from the DFG grant CI 25/2-1 and from the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska Curie grant nr. 705619. LLNL-MI-817289. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, complete- ness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific com- mercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. {"references": ["C. Cimarelli, M. Alatorre-Ibargengoitia, U. Kueppers, B. Scheu, D. Dingwell, Experimen- tal generation of volcanic lightning. Geology 42, 79\u201382 (2014)"]}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C.; Rejas, M.; Lobo, Agustín; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; +2 more
    Publisher: DIGITAL.CSIC
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    This dataset compiles SEM images, modelled isopach map and topographic profiles, and data of radiocarbon ages, parameters of Tephra2 and AshCalc codes of Holocene volcanic ashes of of Southern Puna and neighbouring areas (NW Argentina). SEM images detail differences among the Bolsón de Fiambalá, Cerro Blanco and Cueros de Purulla fallout ash deposits. Tephra2 code was used to simulate the ash fallout, and the AshCalc code to compare different methods for ash volume estimates associated with the 4.2 ka cal BP eruption of the Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex. Topographic profiles are used to explain the secondary thickening of fallout ash deposits. Material suplementario (Figuras S1-S4 y Tablas S1-S4 del artículo Fernandez-Turiel, J.-L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Saavedra, J.; Carracedo, J. C., Rejas, M.; Lobo, A.; Osterrieth, M.; Carrizo, J. I.; Esteban, G.; Gallardo, J.; Ratto, N. (2019). The large eruption 4.2 ka cal BP in Cerro Blanco, Central Volcanic Zone, Andes: Insights to the Holocene eruptive deposits in the southern Puna and adjacent regions. Estudios Geológicos 75(1): e088. https://doi.org/10.3989/egeol.43438.515 MINECO, CGL2011-23307, Proyecto QUECA Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Michèle Marti; Florian Haslinger; Peppoloni Silvia; Di Capua Giuseppe; Helen Glaves; Irina Dallo;
    Publisher: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia
    Countries: Switzerland, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    Novel measurement technologies, additional sensors and increasing data processing capacities offer new opportunities to answer some of the currently most pressing societal and environmental questions. They also contribute to the fact that the available data volume will continue to increase. At the same time, the requirements for those providing such data rise and the needs of users to access it. The EPOS Delivery Framework aims to support this endeavour in the solid Earth domain by providing access to data, products, and services supporting multidisciplinary analyses for a wide range of users. Based on this example, we look at the most pressing issues from when data, products, and services are made accessible, to access principles, ethical issues related to its collection and use as well as with respect to their promotion. Among many peculiarities, we shed light on a common component that affects all fields equally: change. Not only will the amount and type of data, products, and services change, but so will the societal expectations and providers capabilities. Annals of Geophysics, 65 (2) ISSN:1593-5213

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Louis De Barros; Frédéric Cappa; Yves Guglielmi; Laure Duboeuf; Jean-Robert Grasso;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United States, France
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564), EC | SERA (730900), ANR | HYDROSEIS (ANR-13-JS06-0004)

    AbstractThe ability to predict the magnitude of an earthquake caused by deep fluid injections is an important factor for assessing the safety of the reservoir storage and the seismic hazard. Here, we propose a new approach to evaluate the seismic energy released during fluid injection by integrating injection parameters, induced aseismic deformation, and the distance of earthquake sources from injection. We use data from ten injection experiments performed at a decameter scale into fault zones in limestone and shale formations. We observe that the seismic energy and the hydraulic energy similarly depend on the injected fluid volume (V), as they both scale as V3/2. They show, however, a large discrepancy, partly related to a large aseismic deformation. Therefore, to accurately predict the released seismic energy, aseismic deformation should be considered in the budget through the residual deformation measured at the injection. Alternatively, the minimal hypocentral distance from injection points and the critical fluid pressure for fault reactivation can be used for a better prediction of the seismic moment in the total compilation of earthquakes observed during these experiments. Complementary to the prediction based only on the injected fluid volume, our approach opens the possibility of using alternative monitoring parameters to improve traffic-light protocols for induced earthquakes and the regulation of operational injection activities.

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