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18 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Publications
  • Research data
  • Research software
  • 2013-2022
  • European Commission
  • EC|H2020
  • EC|H2020|RIA
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  • EPOS

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Peter Evans; Angelo Strollo; Adam Clark; Tim Ahern; Robert Newman; John Clinton; Helle Pedersen; Catherine Pequegnat;
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    In a move to give credit where it's due, the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks will link digital object identifiers to data from seismic networks and project deployments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    von der Linden, Jens; Kimblin, Clare; McKenna, Ian; Bagley, Skyler; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Houim, Ryan; Kueny, Christopher S.; Kuhl, Allen; Grote, Dave; Converse, Mark; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Background This data is camera images and nozzle pressure gauge voltage traces from rapid decompression shots at the LMU shock tube facility. This data is discussed in the "Materials and Methods" section of the paper "Standing Shock Prevents Propagation of Sparks in Supersonic Explosive Flows". Electric sparks and explosive flows have long been associated with each other. Flowing dust particles originate charge through contact and separate based on inertia, resulting in strong electric fields supporting sparks. These sparks can cause explosions in dusty environments, especially those rich in carbon, such as coal mines and grain elevators. Recent observations of explosive events in nature and decompression experiments indicate that supersonic flows of explosions may alter the electrical discharge process. Shocks may suppress parts of the hierarchy of the discharge phenomena, such as leaders. In our decompression experiments, a shock tube ejects a flow of gas and particles into an expansion chamber. We imaged an illuminated plume from the decompression of a mixture of argon and <100 mg of diamond particles and observe sparks occurring below the sharp boundary of a condensation cloud. We also performed hydrodynamics simulations of the decompression event that provide insight into the conditions supporting the observed behavior. Simulation results agree closely with the experimentally observed Mach disk shock shape and height. This represents direct evidence that the sparks are sculpted by the outflow. The spatial and temporal scale of the sparks transmit an impression of the shock tube flow, a connection that could enable novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible supersonic granular phenomena. Accessing Data The prefixes of the filenames correspond to the shot dates and times listed in table S1 of the paper. The "_camera.zip" files contains tiff images of the camera frames. The ".ixc" file in each zip lists camera settings in plain text. The ".dat" file contains the voltage measurement of the nozzle pressure gauge. Row 1 is the header, row 2 is the time in seconds, and row 3 is the voltage of the pressure gauge in Volts. The peak pressure in the header can be used to relate the voltage to pressure. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and Mission Support and Test Services, LLC, under Contract No. DE-NA0003624 with support from the Site-Directed Research and Development program, DOE/NV/03624--0956, and in part by the European Plate Observing Systems Transnational Access program of the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation program under grant N 676564. CC acknowledges the support from the DFG grant CI 25/2-1 and from the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska Curie grant nr. 705619. LLNL-MI-817289. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, complete- ness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific com- mercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. {"references": ["C. Cimarelli, M. Alatorre-Ibargengoitia, U. Kueppers, B. Scheu, D. Dingwell, Experimen- tal generation of volcanic lightning. Geology 42, 79\u201382 (2014)"]}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Florian Haslinger; Roberto Basili; Rémy Bossu; Carlo Cauzzi; Fabrice Cotton; Helen Crowley; Susana Custodio; Laurentiu Danciu; Mario Locati; Alberto Michelini; +3 more
    Publisher: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia
    Countries: Germany, Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    In this article we describe EPOS Seismology, the Thematic Core Service consortium for the seismology domain within the European Plate Observing System infrastructure. EPOS Seismology was developed alongside the build-up of EPOS during the last decade, in close collaboration between the existing pan-European seismological initiatives ORFEUS (Observatories and Research Facilities for European Seismology), EMSC (Euro-Mediterranean Seismological Center) and EFEHR (European Facilities for Earthquake Hazard and Risk) and their respective communities. It provides on one hand a governance framework that allows a well-coordinated interaction of the seismological community services with EPOS and its bodies, and on the other hand it strengthens the coordination among the already existing seismological initiatives with regard to data, products and service provisioning and further development. Within the EPOS Delivery Framework, ORFEUS, EMSC and EFEHR provide a wide range of services that allow open access to a vast amount of seismological data and products, following and implementing the FAIR principles and supporting open science. Services include access to raw seismic waveforms of thousands of stations together with relevant station and data quality information, parametric earthquake information of recent and historical earthquakes together with advanced event-specific products like moment tensors or source models and further ancillary services, and comprehensive seismic hazard and risk information, covering latest European scale models and their underlying data. The services continue to be available on the well-established domain-specific platforms and websites, and are also consecutively integrated with the interoperable central EPOS data infrastructure. EPOS Seismology and its participating organizations provide a consistent framework for the future development of these services and their operation as EPOS services, closely coordinated also with other international seismological initiatives, and is well set to represent the European seismological research infrastructures and their stakeholders within EPOS. Annals of Geophysics, 65 (2) ISSN:1593-5213

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dino Bindi; Riccardo Zaccarelli; Angelo Strollo; Domenico Di Giacomo;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Konstantinos Michail Leptokaropoulos; Monika Staszek; Stanislaw Lasocki; Patricia Martínez-Garzón; Grzegorz Kwiatek;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | SHEER (640896), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The Geysers geothermal field located in California, USA, is the largest geothermal site in the world, operating since the 1960s. We here investigate and quantify the correlation between temporal seismicity evolution and variation of the injection data by examination of time-series through specified statistical tools (binomial test to investigate significant rate changes, cross correlation between seismic and injection data, b-value variation analysis). To do so, we utilize seismicity and operational data associated with two injection wells (Prati-9 and Prati-29) which cover a time period of approximately 7 yr (from November 2007 to August 2014). The seismicity is found to be significantly positively correlated with the injection rate. The maximum correlation occurs with a seismic response delay of ∼2 weeks, following injection operations. Those results are very stable even after considering hypocentral uncertainties, by applying a vertical shift of the events foci up to 300 m. Our analysis indicates also time variations of b-value, which exhibits significant positive correlation with injection rates.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lucia Luzi; Rodolfo Puglia; Emiliano Russo; Maria D'Amico; Chiara Felicetta; Francesca Pacor; Giovanni Lanzano; Ulubey Çeken; John Clinton; Giovanni Costa; +10 more
    Countries: Germany, Italy
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    This article describes the Engineering Strong‐Motion Database (ESM), developed in the framework of the European project Network of European Research Infrastructures for Earthquake Risk Assessment and Mitigation (NERA, see [Data and Resources][1]). ESM is specifically designed to provide end users only with quality‐checked, uniformly processed strong‐motion data and relevant parameters and has done so since 1969 in the Euro‐Mediterranean region. The database was designed for a large variety of stakeholders (expert seismologists, earthquake engineers, students, and professionals) with a user‐friendly and straightforward web interface. Users can access earthquake and station information and download waveforms of events with magnitude≥4.0 (unprocessed and processed acceleration, velocity, and displacement, and acceleration and displacement response spectra at 5% damping). Specific tools are also available to users to process strong‐motion data and select ground‐motion suites for code‐based seismic structural analyses. [1]: #sec-13

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Irene DeFelipe; Juan Alcalde; Eldar Baykiev; Isabel Bernal; Kittiphon Boonma; Ramon Carbonell; Stephanie Flude; Arnau Folch; Javier Fullea; Daniel García-Castellanos; +13 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
    Countries: Germany, United Kingdom, Spain, Spain
    Project: EC | InnoVar (818144), EC | ChEESE (823844), EC | EPOS SP (871121), EC | SERA (730900), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The immense advances in computer power achieved in the last decades have had a significant impact in Earth science, providing valuable research outputs that allow the simulation of complex natural processes and systems, and generating improved forecasts. The development and implementation of innovative geoscientific software is currently evolving towards a sustainable and efficient development by integrating models of different aspects of the Earth system. This will set the foundation for a future digital twin of the Earth. The codification and update of this software require great effort from research groups and therefore, it needs to be preserved for its reuse by future generations of geoscientists. Here, we report on Geo-Soft-CoRe, a Geoscientific Software & Code Repository, hosted at the archive DIGITAL.CSIC. This is an open source, multidisciplinary and multiscale collection of software and code developed to analyze different aspects of the Earth system, encompassing tools to: 1) analyze climate variability; 2) assess hazards, and 3) characterize the structure and dynamics of the solid Earth. Due to the broad range of applications of these software packages, this collection is useful not only for basic research in Earth science, but also for applied research and educational purposes, reducing the gap between the geosciences and the society. By providing each software and code with a permanent identifier (DOI), we ensure its self-sustainability and accomplish the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) principles. Therefore, we aim for a more transparent science, transferring knowledge in an easier way to the geoscience community, and encouraging an integrated use of computational infrastructure. Systematic Review Registration: https://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/193580 This research has been funded by the Projects EPOS IP 676564, EPOS SP 871121, SERA 730900, GeoCAM (PGC2018-095154-B-I00, Spanish Government) and the Center of Excellence for Exascale in Solid Earth (ChEESE) under the Grant Agreement 823844. IDF was funded by a FEDER-Junta de Castilla y León Postdoctoral contract (SA0084P20). JA and M-GL are funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation through the Juan de la Cierva fellowship (IJC 2018-036074-I and IJC 2018-036826-I, respectively), funded by MCIN/AEI /10.13039/501100011033. AH is grateful for his Ramón y Cajal contract (RYC 2020-029253-I). Additional funding was provided by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (RTI 2018-095594-B-I00, PGC 2018-095154-B-100) and the Generalitat de Catalunya (AGAUR, 2017SGR1022). AP’s work was supported by: a Science Foundation Ireland Career Development Award (17/CDA/4695); an investigator award (16/IA/4520); a Marine Research Programme funded by the Irish Government, co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund (Grant-Aid Agreement No. PBA/CC/18/01); European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme InnoVar under grant agreement No 818144; SFI Centre for Research Training in Foundations of Data Science 18/CRT/6049, and SFI Research Centre awards I-Form 16/RC/3872 and Insight 12/RC/2289_P2. AH and SG thank the Spanish research project PaleoModes (CGL2016-75281-C2-1-R) which provided some of their financial support. JF is supported by an Atracción de Talento senior fellowship (2018-T1/AMB/11493) funded by Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain), and a project funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (PID2020-114854GB-C22). Systematic Review Registration: https://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/193580 Peer reviewed

  • Publication . Article . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Cielesta, Szymon; Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Staszek, Monika; Urban, Paweł; Olszewska, Dorota; Ruigrok, Elmer; Toon, Sam; Picozzi, Matteo; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Cesca, Simone; +5 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands
    Project: EC | SHEER (640896), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The SHEER database brings together a large amount of data of various types: interdisciplinary site data from seven independent episodes, research data and those for the project results dissemination process. This concerns mainly shale gas exploitation test sites, processing procedures, results of data interpretation and recommendations. The smart SHEER database harmonizes data from different fields (geophysical, geochemical, geological, technological, etc.), creates and provides access to an advanced database of case studies of environmental impact indicators associated with shale gas exploitation and exploration, which previously did not exist. A unique component of the SHEER database comes from the monitoring activity performed during the project in one active shale gas exploration and exploitation site at Wysin, Poland, which started from the pre-operational phase. The SHEER database is capable of the adoption of new data such as results of other Work Packages and has developed an over-arching structure for higher-level integration.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jens von der Linden; Clare Kimblin; Ian McKenna; Skyler Bagley; Hsiao-Chi Li; Ryan W. Houim; C. Kueny; Allen Kuhl; D.P. Grote; Mark Converse; +4 more
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Volcanic jet flows in explosive eruptions emit radio frequency signatures, indicative of their fluid dynamic and electrostatic conditions. The emissions originate from sparks supported by an electric field built up by the ejected charged volcanic particles. When shock-defined, low-pressure regions confine the sparks, the signatures may be limited to high-frequency content corresponding to the early components of the avalanche-streamer-leader hierarchy. Here, we image sparks and a standing shock together in a transient supersonic jet of micro-diamonds entrained in argon. Fluid dynamic and kinetic simulations of the experiment demonstrate that the observed sparks originate upstream of the standing shock. The sparks are initiated in the rarefaction region, and cut off at the shock, which would limit their radio frequency emissions to a tell-tale high-frequency regime. We show that sparks transmit an impression of the explosive flow, and open the way for novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible explosive phenomena. 9 pages, 6 figures

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maccaferri, Francesco; Richter, Nicole; Walter, Thomas R.;
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | VOLCAPSE (646858), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Flank instability and lateral collapse are recurrent processes during the structural evolution of volcanic edifices, and they affect and are affected by magmatic activity. It is known that dyke intrusions have the potential to destabilise the flanks of a volcano, and that lateral collapses may change the style of volcanism and the arrangement of shallow dykes. However, the effect of a large lateral collapse on the location of a new eruptive centre remains unclear. Here, we use a numerical approach to simulate the pathways of magmatic intrusions underneath the volcanic edifice, after the stress redistribution resulting from a large lateral collapse. Our simulations are quantitatively validated against the observations at Fogo volcano, Cabo Verde. The results reveal that a lateral collapse can trigger a significant deflection of deep magma pathways in the crust, favouring the formation of a new eruptive centre within the collapse embayment. Our results have implications for the long-term evolution of intraplate volcanic ocean islands. Flank instability and lateral collapse are a potential hazard at volcanic edifices. Here, the authors use numerical simulations to show that at Fogo volcano, lateral collapse can trigger a significant deflection of magma pathways in the crust, demonstrating how volcanic edifices may evolve.

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18 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Peter Evans; Angelo Strollo; Adam Clark; Tim Ahern; Robert Newman; John Clinton; Helle Pedersen; Catherine Pequegnat;
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    In a move to give credit where it's due, the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks will link digital object identifiers to data from seismic networks and project deployments.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    von der Linden, Jens; Kimblin, Clare; McKenna, Ian; Bagley, Skyler; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Houim, Ryan; Kueny, Christopher S.; Kuhl, Allen; Grote, Dave; Converse, Mark; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Background This data is camera images and nozzle pressure gauge voltage traces from rapid decompression shots at the LMU shock tube facility. This data is discussed in the "Materials and Methods" section of the paper "Standing Shock Prevents Propagation of Sparks in Supersonic Explosive Flows". Electric sparks and explosive flows have long been associated with each other. Flowing dust particles originate charge through contact and separate based on inertia, resulting in strong electric fields supporting sparks. These sparks can cause explosions in dusty environments, especially those rich in carbon, such as coal mines and grain elevators. Recent observations of explosive events in nature and decompression experiments indicate that supersonic flows of explosions may alter the electrical discharge process. Shocks may suppress parts of the hierarchy of the discharge phenomena, such as leaders. In our decompression experiments, a shock tube ejects a flow of gas and particles into an expansion chamber. We imaged an illuminated plume from the decompression of a mixture of argon and <100 mg of diamond particles and observe sparks occurring below the sharp boundary of a condensation cloud. We also performed hydrodynamics simulations of the decompression event that provide insight into the conditions supporting the observed behavior. Simulation results agree closely with the experimentally observed Mach disk shock shape and height. This represents direct evidence that the sparks are sculpted by the outflow. The spatial and temporal scale of the sparks transmit an impression of the shock tube flow, a connection that could enable novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible supersonic granular phenomena. Accessing Data The prefixes of the filenames correspond to the shot dates and times listed in table S1 of the paper. The "_camera.zip" files contains tiff images of the camera frames. The ".ixc" file in each zip lists camera settings in plain text. The ".dat" file contains the voltage measurement of the nozzle pressure gauge. Row 1 is the header, row 2 is the time in seconds, and row 3 is the voltage of the pressure gauge in Volts. The peak pressure in the header can be used to relate the voltage to pressure. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and Mission Support and Test Services, LLC, under Contract No. DE-NA0003624 with support from the Site-Directed Research and Development program, DOE/NV/03624--0956, and in part by the European Plate Observing Systems Transnational Access program of the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation program under grant N 676564. CC acknowledges the support from the DFG grant CI 25/2-1 and from the European Community HORIZON 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska Curie grant nr. 705619. LLNL-MI-817289. This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, nor any of their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, complete- ness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific com- mercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. {"references": ["C. Cimarelli, M. Alatorre-Ibargengoitia, U. Kueppers, B. Scheu, D. Dingwell, Experimen- tal generation of volcanic lightning. Geology 42, 79\u201382 (2014)"]}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Florian Haslinger; Roberto Basili; Rémy Bossu; Carlo Cauzzi; Fabrice Cotton; Helen Crowley; Susana Custodio; Laurentiu Danciu; Mario Locati; Alberto Michelini; +3 more
    Publisher: Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia
    Countries: Germany, Switzerland
    Project: EC | EPOS SP (871121)

    In this article we describe EPOS Seismology, the Thematic Core Service consortium for the seismology domain within the European Plate Observing System infrastructure. EPOS Seismology was developed alongside the build-up of EPOS during the last decade, in close collaboration between the existing pan-European seismological initiatives ORFEUS (Observatories and Research Facilities for European Seismology), EMSC (Euro-Mediterranean Seismological Center) and EFEHR (European Facilities for Earthquake Hazard and Risk) and their respective communities. It provides on one hand a governance framework that allows a well-coordinated interaction of the seismological community services with EPOS and its bodies, and on the other hand it strengthens the coordination among the already existing seismological initiatives with regard to data, products and service provisioning and further development. Within the EPOS Delivery Framework, ORFEUS, EMSC and EFEHR provide a wide range of services that allow open access to a vast amount of seismological data and products, following and implementing the FAIR principles and supporting open science. Services include access to raw seismic waveforms of thousands of stations together with relevant station and data quality information, parametric earthquake information of recent and historical earthquakes together with advanced event-specific products like moment tensors or source models and further ancillary services, and comprehensive seismic hazard and risk information, covering latest European scale models and their underlying data. The services continue to be available on the well-established domain-specific platforms and websites, and are also consecutively integrated with the interoperable central EPOS data infrastructure. EPOS Seismology and its participating organizations provide a consistent framework for the future development of these services and their operation as EPOS services, closely coordinated also with other international seismological initiatives, and is well set to represent the European seismological research infrastructures and their stakeholders within EPOS. Annals of Geophysics, 65 (2) ISSN:1593-5213

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dino Bindi; Riccardo Zaccarelli; Angelo Strollo; Domenico Di Giacomo;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Konstantinos Michail Leptokaropoulos; Monika Staszek; Stanislaw Lasocki; Patricia Martínez-Garzón; Grzegorz Kwiatek;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | SHEER (640896), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The Geysers geothermal field located in California, USA, is the largest geothermal site in the world, operating since the 1960s. We here investigate and quantify the correlation between temporal seismicity evolution and variation of the injection data by examination of time-series through specified statistical tools (binomial test to investigate significant rate changes, cross correlation between seismic and injection data, b-value variation analysis). To do so, we utilize seismicity and operational data associated with two injection wells (Prati-9 and Prati-29) which cover a time period of approximately 7 yr (from November 2007 to August 2014). The seismicity is found to be significantly positively correlated with the injection rate. The maximum correlation occurs with a seismic response delay of ∼2 weeks, following injection operations. Those results are very stable even after considering hypocentral uncertainties, by applying a vertical shift of the events foci up to 300 m. Our analysis indicates also time variations of b-value, which exhibits significant positive correlation with injection rates.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lucia Luzi; Rodolfo Puglia; Emiliano Russo; Maria D'Amico; Chiara Felicetta; Francesca Pacor; Giovanni Lanzano; Ulubey Çeken; John Clinton; Giovanni Costa; +10 more
    Countries: Germany, Italy
    Project: EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    This article describes the Engineering Strong‐Motion Database (ESM), developed in the framework of the European project Network of European Research Infrastructures for Earthquake Risk Assessment and Mitigation (NERA, see [Data and Resources][1]). ESM is specifically designed to provide end users only with quality‐checked, uniformly processed strong‐motion data and relevant parameters and has done so since 1969 in the Euro‐Mediterranean region. The database was designed for a large variety of stakeholders (expert seismologists, earthquake engineers, students, and professionals) with a user‐friendly and straightforward web interface. Users can access earthquake and station information and download waveforms of events with magnitude≥4.0 (unprocessed and processed acceleration, velocity, and displacement, and acceleration and displacement response spectra at 5% damping). Specific tools are also available to users to process strong‐motion data and select ground‐motion suites for code‐based seismic structural analyses. [1]: #sec-13

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Irene DeFelipe; Juan Alcalde; Eldar Baykiev; Isabel Bernal; Kittiphon Boonma; Ramon Carbonell; Stephanie Flude; Arnau Folch; Javier Fullea; Daniel García-Castellanos; +13 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
    Countries: Germany, United Kingdom, Spain, Spain
    Project: EC | InnoVar (818144), EC | ChEESE (823844), EC | EPOS SP (871121), EC | SERA (730900), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The immense advances in computer power achieved in the last decades have had a significant impact in Earth science, providing valuable research outputs that allow the simulation of complex natural processes and systems, and generating improved forecasts. The development and implementation of innovative geoscientific software is currently evolving towards a sustainable and efficient development by integrating models of different aspects of the Earth system. This will set the foundation for a future digital twin of the Earth. The codification and update of this software require great effort from research groups and therefore, it needs to be preserved for its reuse by future generations of geoscientists. Here, we report on Geo-Soft-CoRe, a Geoscientific Software & Code Repository, hosted at the archive DIGITAL.CSIC. This is an open source, multidisciplinary and multiscale collection of software and code developed to analyze different aspects of the Earth system, encompassing tools to: 1) analyze climate variability; 2) assess hazards, and 3) characterize the structure and dynamics of the solid Earth. Due to the broad range of applications of these software packages, this collection is useful not only for basic research in Earth science, but also for applied research and educational purposes, reducing the gap between the geosciences and the society. By providing each software and code with a permanent identifier (DOI), we ensure its self-sustainability and accomplish the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) principles. Therefore, we aim for a more transparent science, transferring knowledge in an easier way to the geoscience community, and encouraging an integrated use of computational infrastructure. Systematic Review Registration: https://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/193580 This research has been funded by the Projects EPOS IP 676564, EPOS SP 871121, SERA 730900, GeoCAM (PGC2018-095154-B-I00, Spanish Government) and the Center of Excellence for Exascale in Solid Earth (ChEESE) under the Grant Agreement 823844. IDF was funded by a FEDER-Junta de Castilla y León Postdoctoral contract (SA0084P20). JA and M-GL are funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation through the Juan de la Cierva fellowship (IJC 2018-036074-I and IJC 2018-036826-I, respectively), funded by MCIN/AEI /10.13039/501100011033. AH is grateful for his Ramón y Cajal contract (RYC 2020-029253-I). Additional funding was provided by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (RTI 2018-095594-B-I00, PGC 2018-095154-B-100) and the Generalitat de Catalunya (AGAUR, 2017SGR1022). AP’s work was supported by: a Science Foundation Ireland Career Development Award (17/CDA/4695); an investigator award (16/IA/4520); a Marine Research Programme funded by the Irish Government, co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund (Grant-Aid Agreement No. PBA/CC/18/01); European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme InnoVar under grant agreement No 818144; SFI Centre for Research Training in Foundations of Data Science 18/CRT/6049, and SFI Research Centre awards I-Form 16/RC/3872 and Insight 12/RC/2289_P2. AH and SG thank the Spanish research project PaleoModes (CGL2016-75281-C2-1-R) which provided some of their financial support. JF is supported by an Atracción de Talento senior fellowship (2018-T1/AMB/11493) funded by Comunidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain), and a project funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (PID2020-114854GB-C22). Systematic Review Registration: https://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/193580 Peer reviewed

  • Publication . Article . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Cielesta, Szymon; Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Staszek, Monika; Urban, Paweł; Olszewska, Dorota; Ruigrok, Elmer; Toon, Sam; Picozzi, Matteo; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Cesca, Simone; +5 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Germany, Netherlands
    Project: EC | SHEER (640896), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    The SHEER database brings together a large amount of data of various types: interdisciplinary site data from seven independent episodes, research data and those for the project results dissemination process. This concerns mainly shale gas exploitation test sites, processing procedures, results of data interpretation and recommendations. The smart SHEER database harmonizes data from different fields (geophysical, geochemical, geological, technological, etc.), creates and provides access to an advanced database of case studies of environmental impact indicators associated with shale gas exploitation and exploration, which previously did not exist. A unique component of the SHEER database comes from the monitoring activity performed during the project in one active shale gas exploration and exploitation site at Wysin, Poland, which started from the pre-operational phase. The SHEER database is capable of the adoption of new data such as results of other Work Packages and has developed an over-arching structure for higher-level integration.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jens von der Linden; Clare Kimblin; Ian McKenna; Skyler Bagley; Hsiao-Chi Li; Ryan W. Houim; C. Kueny; Allen Kuhl; D.P. Grote; Mark Converse; +4 more
    Project: EC | VOLTAIC (705619), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Volcanic jet flows in explosive eruptions emit radio frequency signatures, indicative of their fluid dynamic and electrostatic conditions. The emissions originate from sparks supported by an electric field built up by the ejected charged volcanic particles. When shock-defined, low-pressure regions confine the sparks, the signatures may be limited to high-frequency content corresponding to the early components of the avalanche-streamer-leader hierarchy. Here, we image sparks and a standing shock together in a transient supersonic jet of micro-diamonds entrained in argon. Fluid dynamic and kinetic simulations of the experiment demonstrate that the observed sparks originate upstream of the standing shock. The sparks are initiated in the rarefaction region, and cut off at the shock, which would limit their radio frequency emissions to a tell-tale high-frequency regime. We show that sparks transmit an impression of the explosive flow, and open the way for novel instrumentation to diagnose currently inaccessible explosive phenomena. 9 pages, 6 figures

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maccaferri, Francesco; Richter, Nicole; Walter, Thomas R.;
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | VOLCAPSE (646858), EC | EPOS IP (676564)

    Flank instability and lateral collapse are recurrent processes during the structural evolution of volcanic edifices, and they affect and are affected by magmatic activity. It is known that dyke intrusions have the potential to destabilise the flanks of a volcano, and that lateral collapses may change the style of volcanism and the arrangement of shallow dykes. However, the effect of a large lateral collapse on the location of a new eruptive centre remains unclear. Here, we use a numerical approach to simulate the pathways of magmatic intrusions underneath the volcanic edifice, after the stress redistribution resulting from a large lateral collapse. Our simulations are quantitatively validated against the observations at Fogo volcano, Cabo Verde. The results reveal that a lateral collapse can trigger a significant deflection of deep magma pathways in the crust, favouring the formation of a new eruptive centre within the collapse embayment. Our results have implications for the long-term evolution of intraplate volcanic ocean islands. Flank instability and lateral collapse are a potential hazard at volcanic edifices. Here, the authors use numerical simulations to show that at Fogo volcano, lateral collapse can trigger a significant deflection of magma pathways in the crust, demonstrating how volcanic edifices may evolve.

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