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  • English
    Authors: 
    Edmond, Jennifer; Basaraba, Nicole; Doran, Michelle; Garnett, Vicky; Grile, Courtney Helen; Papaki, Eliza; Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jocelyn Raude; Marion Debin; Cécile Souty; Caroline Guerris; Iclement Turbelin; Alessandra Falchi; Isabelle Bonmarin; Daniela Paolotti; Yamir Moreno; Chinelo Obi; +5 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    The recent emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 in China has raised the spectre of a novel, potentially catastrophic pandemic in both scientific and lay communities throughout the world. In this particular context, people have been accused of being excessively pessimistic regarding the future consequences of this emerging health threat. However, consistent with previous research in social psychology, a large survey conducted in Europe in the early stage of the COVID-19 epidemic shows that the majority of respondents was actually overly optimistic about the risk of infection. https://psyarxiv.com/364qj/

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elizabeth Wrigley-Field; Mathew V. Kiang; Alicia R Riley; Magali Barbieri; Yea-Hung Chen; Kate A. Duchowny; Ellicott C. Matthay; David Van Riper; Kirrthana Jegathesan; Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo; +1 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United States

    COVID-19 mortality increases markedly with age and is also substantially higher among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) populations in the United States. These two facts can have conflicting implications because BIPOC populations are younger than white populations. In analyses of California and Minnesota—demographically divergent states—we show that COVID vaccination schedules based solely on age benefit the older white populations at the expense of younger BIPOC populations with higher risk of death from COVID-19. We find that strategies that prioritize high-risk geographic areas for vaccination at all ages better target mortality risk than age-based strategies alone, although they do not always perform as well as direct prioritization of high-risk racial/ethnic groups. Vaccination schemas directly implicate equitability of access, both domestically and globally. Age-based COVID-19 vaccination prioritizes white people above higher-risk others; geographic prioritization improves equity. Description

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3 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • English
    Authors: 
    Edmond, Jennifer; Basaraba, Nicole; Doran, Michelle; Garnett, Vicky; Grile, Courtney Helen; Papaki, Eliza; Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jocelyn Raude; Marion Debin; Cécile Souty; Caroline Guerris; Iclement Turbelin; Alessandra Falchi; Isabelle Bonmarin; Daniela Paolotti; Yamir Moreno; Chinelo Obi; +5 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    The recent emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 in China has raised the spectre of a novel, potentially catastrophic pandemic in both scientific and lay communities throughout the world. In this particular context, people have been accused of being excessively pessimistic regarding the future consequences of this emerging health threat. However, consistent with previous research in social psychology, a large survey conducted in Europe in the early stage of the COVID-19 epidemic shows that the majority of respondents was actually overly optimistic about the risk of infection. https://psyarxiv.com/364qj/

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elizabeth Wrigley-Field; Mathew V. Kiang; Alicia R Riley; Magali Barbieri; Yea-Hung Chen; Kate A. Duchowny; Ellicott C. Matthay; David Van Riper; Kirrthana Jegathesan; Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo; +1 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United States

    COVID-19 mortality increases markedly with age and is also substantially higher among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) populations in the United States. These two facts can have conflicting implications because BIPOC populations are younger than white populations. In analyses of California and Minnesota—demographically divergent states—we show that COVID vaccination schedules based solely on age benefit the older white populations at the expense of younger BIPOC populations with higher risk of death from COVID-19. We find that strategies that prioritize high-risk geographic areas for vaccination at all ages better target mortality risk than age-based strategies alone, although they do not always perform as well as direct prioritization of high-risk racial/ethnic groups. Vaccination schemas directly implicate equitability of access, both domestically and globally. Age-based COVID-19 vaccination prioritizes white people above higher-risk others; geographic prioritization improves equity. Description

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