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  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • 03 medical and health sciences
  • 030212 general & internal medicine
  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gianna Petrone; Linda Brown; William Binder; Sonya Naganathan; Scott Pasichow; Heather Rybasack-Smith; Cathy E Duquette; Dana R Palka; Andrew N Musits;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press

    AbstractObjectives:Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been identified as an acute respiratory illness leading to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. As the disease spread, demands on health care systems increased, specifically the need to expand hospital capacity. Alternative care hospitals (ACHs) have been used to mitigate these issues; however, establishing an ACH has many challenges. The goal of this session was to perform systems testing, using a simulation-based evaluation to identify areas in need of improvement.Methods:Four simulation cases were designed to depict common and high acuity situations encountered in the ACH, using a high technology simulator and standardized patient. A multidisciplinary observer group was given debriefing forms listing the objectives, critical actions, and specific areas to focus their attention. These forms were compiled for data collection.Results:Logistical, operational, and patient safety issues were identified during the simulation and compiled into a simulation event report. Proposed solutions and protocol changes were made in response to the identified issues.Conclusion:Simulation was successfully used for systems testing, supporting efforts to maximize patient care and provider safety in a rapidly developed ACH. The simulation event report identified operational deficiencies and safety concerns directly resulting in equipment modifications and protocol changes.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vahid Rahimkhoei; Jafar Rezaie; Ali Akbari; Aynaz Nourani; Nassrollah Jabbari; Zohreh Mehri Lighvan; Mojtaba Amini;
    Publisher: Wiley

    Today, tremendous attention has been devoted to a new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 (2019-nCoV), due to severe effects on the global public in all over the world. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of 2019-nCoV are important for early treatment and cutting off epidemic transmission. In this regard, laboratory detection protocols, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and computed tomography (CT) examination, have been utilized broadly for 2019-nCoV detection. Recently, nano-based methods for 2019-nCoV diagnoses are rapidly expanding and declaring comparable results with PCR and CT. In this review, recent advances in nano-based techniques have been highlighted and compared briefly with PCR and CT as well-known methods for 2019-nCoV detection.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Joana Gomes da Silva; Carla Silva; Bárbara Alexandre; Pedro Morgado;
    Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    Background: COVID-19 is a respiratory disease transmitted through respiratory droplets with a high transmission rate. There's still no effective and approved antiretroviral treatment or vaccine, thus, preventive measures are the main key to contain this pandemic. Portugal is now in phase 3.2 of the mitigation of COVID-19, being imperative to understand the health literacy of our country and how to prevent the lack of information, through community empowerment. Material and methods: A cross-sectional study with a cohort from a primary care facility was conducted. We collected demographic and epidemiological data and carried out a questionnaire by phone call. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests were used to assess associations between the independent variables and the level of health literacy. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Our cohort includes 222 subjects (median age: 62 years old), mostly females (131), undergraduate (193) and with at least one risk factor for COVID-19 (144). Globally, younger individuals, females, graduates and the Non-Risk Group appear to have higher levels of health literacy, with some exceptions to this pattern. Conclusions: We observe a well-informed population. However, being a pandemic situation, we intend to identify and correct outliers/misconceptions. This work allows a perspective of the current state/pattern of health literacy as well as its possible predictors. Furthermore, this study makes aware of how relevant the specific communication approaches are. Further studies to understand the predictors of health literacy are necessary. Key-Words: COVID-19, pandemic, SARS-CoV2, Portugal, Health literacy.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dimitrios Farmakis; Anastasios Giakoumis; Lily Cannon; Michael Angastiniotis; Androulla Eleftheriou;
    Publisher: Wiley

    Abstract Objectives Many patients with haemoglobinopathies, including thalassaemia and sickle cell disease, are at increased risk of developing severe complications from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19). Although epidemiologic evidence concerning the novel coronavirus (SARS‐CoV‐2) infection in these patients is currently lacking, the COVID‐19 pandemic represents a significant challenge for haemoglobinopathy patients, their families and their attending physicians. Methods The present statement summarizes the key challenges concerning the management of haemoglobinopathies, with particular focus on patients with either transfusion‐dependent or non‐transfusion‐dependent thalassaemia, identifies the gaps in knowledge and suggests measures and strategies to deal with the pandemic, based on available evidence and expert opinions. Key areas covered include patients’ risk level, adaptation of haemoglobinopathy care, safety of blood transfusions, blood supply challenges, and lifestyle and nutritional considerations. Conclusions The proposed measures and strategies may be useful as a blueprint for other disorders which require regular hospital visits, as well as for the timely adaptation of patient care during similar future pandemics.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tracy R. Montauk; Emily A. Kuhl;
    Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)

    Due to stringent but necessary infection control mandates, the COVID-19 pandemic is increasingly resulting in family separation from loved ones admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Even in normal circumstances, ICU families frequently experience significant psychological dysfunction-including posttraumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related reactions, especially during the end of life period. The COVID pandemic likely will exacerbate these reactions as more and more families are being barred from the ICU. Consequently, ICU families are facing additional barriers in fully understanding the complex medical needs of their loved ones (and hence being able to make informed care decisions on their behalf); establishing rapport and bonding with nurses and other members of the ICU treatment team; and, in the event that a loved one passes, achieving closure. ICU health care providers can take steps to mitigate these outcomes by being mindful of the unique stressors ICU families are currently facing and tailoring their communication and behavior accordingly. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ludmilla Candido Santos; Ying Hui Low; Konstantin Inozemtsev; Alexander Nagrebetsky;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    The COVID-19 pandemic has seen many hurdles to crucial research processes, in particular those that depend on personnel interactions, in providing safeguards against the incipient infectious disease. At the same time, there was a rapid redirection of research, driven by popular and social media and demand for pandemic-related content, to the detriment of non–COVID-19 research and perhaps to COVID-19 research itself. This article provides historical context to research redirection and discusses approaches to optimizing research methodology in the setting of COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marcus Vinicius Dantas de Assunção; Carla Simone de Lima Teixeira Assunção; Rute Anadila Amorim de Oliveira; Mariah Caroline Martins de Sousa;
    Publisher: Grupo de Pesquisa Metodologias em Ensino e Aprendizagem em Ciências

    Since the beginning of the year 2020, the world has been experiencing a COVID-19 pandemic, which challenges the public sector to make quick and efficient decisions, as the result is counted in lives. Thus, it is necessary to search for predictive models that support the decision and assist in the understanding of the behavior of the transmissions. In this context, the work aims to present a dynamic model for the daily increase in the number of deaths in order to determine a safety range capable of predicting a stabilization period for these deaths. For this, the model uses exponential and potential curves as limits for analyzing the behavior of the increment curve. The model proved to be efficient when compared to the actual data obtained so far.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Akca, Ummusen Kaya; Kesici, Selman; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Atalay, Erdal; Demir, Selcan; Sag, Erdal; Vuralli, Dogus; Bayrakci, Benan; +2 more
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    Children with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are being reported to have manifestations of hyperinflammatory states and/or Kawasaki-like disease. In this study, we investigated children with typical and atypical Kawasaki disease (KD) likely to be associated with COVID-19. We have reported four children with Kawasaki-like disease probably associated with COVID-19. The clinical features were consistent with incomplete KD in three patients. SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR was positive in one and the serology was positive in one patient with negative RT-PCR. Corticosteroids, anakinra, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and acetylsalicylic acid were used in the treatment. Three patients recovered after the treatment while one patient died. The literature review revealed 36 articles describing 320 children with Kawasaki-like disease associated with COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR was negative in 120 (65.5%) of 183 patients while the serology was positive in 130 (83.8%) of 155 patients. The therapeutic options have included IVIG, acetylsalicylic acid, tocilizumab, anakinra, enoxaparin, and methylprednisolone. Pediatric COVID-19 cases may present with atypical/incomplete Kawasaki-like disease. Thus, pediatricians need to be aware of such atypical presentations resembling KD for early diagnosis of COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Daniel Arthur B. Kasal; Andrea De Lorenzo; Eduardo Tibiriçá;
    Publisher: Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V.

    The recently described severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected millions of people, with thousands of fatalities. It has prompted global efforts in research, with focus on the pathophysiology of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), and a rapid surge of publications. COVID-19 has been associated with a myriad of clinical manifestations, including the lungs, heart, kidneys, central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, skin, and blood coagulation abnormalities. The endothelium plays a key role in organ dysfunction associated with severe infection, and current data suggest that it is also involved in SARS-CoV-2-induced sepsis. This critical review aimed to address a possible unifying mechanism underlying the diverse complications of COVID-19: microvascular dysfunction, with emphasis on the renin-angiotensin system. In addition, research perspectives are suggested in order to expand understanding of the pathophysiology of the infection.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Iwijn De Vlaminck;
    Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

    A machine learning algorithm identifies blood-borne markers that are predictive of COVID-19 mortality.

Advanced search in
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102,311 Research products, page 1 of 10,232
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gianna Petrone; Linda Brown; William Binder; Sonya Naganathan; Scott Pasichow; Heather Rybasack-Smith; Cathy E Duquette; Dana R Palka; Andrew N Musits;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press

    AbstractObjectives:Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been identified as an acute respiratory illness leading to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. As the disease spread, demands on health care systems increased, specifically the need to expand hospital capacity. Alternative care hospitals (ACHs) have been used to mitigate these issues; however, establishing an ACH has many challenges. The goal of this session was to perform systems testing, using a simulation-based evaluation to identify areas in need of improvement.Methods:Four simulation cases were designed to depict common and high acuity situations encountered in the ACH, using a high technology simulator and standardized patient. A multidisciplinary observer group was given debriefing forms listing the objectives, critical actions, and specific areas to focus their attention. These forms were compiled for data collection.Results:Logistical, operational, and patient safety issues were identified during the simulation and compiled into a simulation event report. Proposed solutions and protocol changes were made in response to the identified issues.Conclusion:Simulation was successfully used for systems testing, supporting efforts to maximize patient care and provider safety in a rapidly developed ACH. The simulation event report identified operational deficiencies and safety concerns directly resulting in equipment modifications and protocol changes.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vahid Rahimkhoei; Jafar Rezaie; Ali Akbari; Aynaz Nourani; Nassrollah Jabbari; Zohreh Mehri Lighvan; Mojtaba Amini;
    Publisher: Wiley

    Today, tremendous attention has been devoted to a new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 (2019-nCoV), due to severe effects on the global public in all over the world. Rapid and accurate diagnosis of 2019-nCoV are important for early treatment and cutting off epidemic transmission. In this regard, laboratory detection protocols, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and computed tomography (CT) examination, have been utilized broadly for 2019-nCoV detection. Recently, nano-based methods for 2019-nCoV diagnoses are rapidly expanding and declaring comparable results with PCR and CT. In this review, recent advances in nano-based techniques have been highlighted and compared briefly with PCR and CT as well-known methods for 2019-nCoV detection.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Joana Gomes da Silva; Carla Silva; Bárbara Alexandre; Pedro Morgado;
    Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    Background: COVID-19 is a respiratory disease transmitted through respiratory droplets with a high transmission rate. There's still no effective and approved antiretroviral treatment or vaccine, thus, preventive measures are the main key to contain this pandemic. Portugal is now in phase 3.2 of the mitigation of COVID-19, being imperative to understand the health literacy of our country and how to prevent the lack of information, through community empowerment. Material and methods: A cross-sectional study with a cohort from a primary care facility was conducted. We collected demographic and epidemiological data and carried out a questionnaire by phone call. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests were used to assess associations between the independent variables and the level of health literacy. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Our cohort includes 222 subjects (median age: 62 years old), mostly females (131), undergraduate (193) and with at least one risk factor for COVID-19 (144). Globally, younger individuals, females, graduates and the Non-Risk Group appear to have higher levels of health literacy, with some exceptions to this pattern. Conclusions: We observe a well-informed population. However, being a pandemic situation, we intend to identify and correct outliers/misconceptions. This work allows a perspective of the current state/pattern of health literacy as well as its possible predictors. Furthermore, this study makes aware of how relevant the specific communication approaches are. Further studies to understand the predictors of health literacy are necessary. Key-Words: COVID-19, pandemic, SARS-CoV2, Portugal, Health literacy.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dimitrios Farmakis; Anastasios Giakoumis; Lily Cannon; Michael Angastiniotis; Androulla Eleftheriou;
    Publisher: Wiley

    Abstract Objectives Many patients with haemoglobinopathies, including thalassaemia and sickle cell disease, are at increased risk of developing severe complications from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19). Although epidemiologic evidence concerning the novel coronavirus (SARS‐CoV‐2) infection in these patients is currently lacking, the COVID‐19 pandemic represents a significant challenge for haemoglobinopathy patients, their families and their attending physicians. Methods The present statement summarizes the key challenges concerning the management of haemoglobinopathies, with particular focus on patients with either transfusion‐dependent or non‐transfusion‐dependent thalassaemia, identifies the gaps in knowledge and suggests measures and strategies to deal with the pandemic, based on available evidence and expert opinions. Key areas covered include patients’ risk level, adaptation of haemoglobinopathy care, safety of blood transfusions, blood supply challenges, and lifestyle and nutritional considerations. Conclusions The proposed measures and strategies may be useful as a blueprint for other disorders which require regular hospital visits, as well as for the timely adaptation of patient care during similar future pandemics.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tracy R. Montauk; Emily A. Kuhl;
    Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)

    Due to stringent but necessary infection control mandates, the COVID-19 pandemic is increasingly resulting in family separation from loved ones admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Even in normal circumstances, ICU families frequently experience significant psychological dysfunction-including posttraumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related reactions, especially during the end of life period. The COVID pandemic likely will exacerbate these reactions as more and more families are being barred from the ICU. Consequently, ICU families are facing additional barriers in fully understanding the complex medical needs of their loved ones (and hence being able to make informed care decisions on their behalf); establishing rapport and bonding with nurses and other members of the ICU treatment team; and, in the event that a loved one passes, achieving closure. ICU health care providers can take steps to mitigate these outcomes by being mindful of the unique stressors ICU families are currently facing and tailoring their communication and behavior accordingly. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ludmilla Candido Santos; Ying Hui Low; Konstantin Inozemtsev; Alexander Nagrebetsky;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    The COVID-19 pandemic has seen many hurdles to crucial research processes, in particular those that depend on personnel interactions, in providing safeguards against the incipient infectious disease. At the same time, there was a rapid redirection of research, driven by popular and social media and demand for pandemic-related content, to the detriment of non–COVID-19 research and perhaps to COVID-19 research itself. This article provides historical context to research redirection and discusses approaches to optimizing research methodology in the setting of COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marcus Vinicius Dantas de Assunção; Carla Simone de Lima Teixeira Assunção; Rute Anadila Amorim de Oliveira; Mariah Caroline Martins de Sousa;
    Publisher: Grupo de Pesquisa Metodologias em Ensino e Aprendizagem em Ciências

    Since the beginning of the year 2020, the world has been experiencing a COVID-19 pandemic, which challenges the public sector to make quick and efficient decisions, as the result is counted in lives. Thus, it is necessary to search for predictive models that support the decision and assist in the understanding of the behavior of the transmissions. In this context, the work aims to present a dynamic model for the daily increase in the number of deaths in order to determine a safety range capable of predicting a stabilization period for these deaths. For this, the model uses exponential and potential curves as limits for analyzing the behavior of the increment curve. The model proved to be efficient when compared to the actual data obtained so far.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Akca, Ummusen Kaya; Kesici, Selman; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykan, Hayrettin Hakan; Batu, Ezgi Deniz; Atalay, Erdal; Demir, Selcan; Sag, Erdal; Vuralli, Dogus; Bayrakci, Benan; +2 more
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC

    Children with Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are being reported to have manifestations of hyperinflammatory states and/or Kawasaki-like disease. In this study, we investigated children with typical and atypical Kawasaki disease (KD) likely to be associated with COVID-19. We have reported four children with Kawasaki-like disease probably associated with COVID-19. The clinical features were consistent with incomplete KD in three patients. SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR was positive in one and the serology was positive in one patient with negative RT-PCR. Corticosteroids, anakinra, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and acetylsalicylic acid were used in the treatment. Three patients recovered after the treatment while one patient died. The literature review revealed 36 articles describing 320 children with Kawasaki-like disease associated with COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR was negative in 120 (65.5%) of 183 patients while the serology was positive in 130 (83.8%) of 155 patients. The therapeutic options have included IVIG, acetylsalicylic acid, tocilizumab, anakinra, enoxaparin, and methylprednisolone. Pediatric COVID-19 cases may present with atypical/incomplete Kawasaki-like disease. Thus, pediatricians need to be aware of such atypical presentations resembling KD for early diagnosis of COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Daniel Arthur B. Kasal; Andrea De Lorenzo; Eduardo Tibiriçá;
    Publisher: Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V.

    The recently described severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected millions of people, with thousands of fatalities. It has prompted global efforts in research, with focus on the pathophysiology of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), and a rapid surge of publications. COVID-19 has been associated with a myriad of clinical manifestations, including the lungs, heart, kidneys, central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, skin, and blood coagulation abnormalities. The endothelium plays a key role in organ dysfunction associated with severe infection, and current data suggest that it is also involved in SARS-CoV-2-induced sepsis. This critical review aimed to address a possible unifying mechanism underlying the diverse complications of COVID-19: microvascular dysfunction, with emphasis on the renin-angiotensin system. In addition, research perspectives are suggested in order to expand understanding of the pathophysiology of the infection.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Iwijn De Vlaminck;
    Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

    A machine learning algorithm identifies blood-borne markers that are predictive of COVID-19 mortality.

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