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15 Research products, page 1 of 2

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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2016
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Emiliano Degl'Innocenti; Alfredo Cosco; Fabrizio Butini; Roberta Giacomi; Vinicio Serafini;
    Publisher: Springer, Cham, Heidelberg, New York, Dordrecht, London, CHE
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | CENDARI (284432)

    TRAME is a research infrastructure for medieval manuscripts. The TRAME engine scans a set of sources for searched terms and retrieves links to a wide range of possible information, from simple reference, to detailed manuscript record, to full text transcriptions. Currently, it is possible to perform queries by: free-text, shelfmark, author, title, date, copyst or incipit, on more than 80 selected scholarly digital resources across EU and USA. Since 2014 September 1st, TRAME has entered a new phase and the current work is focused on: extending the meta-search approach to other web resources, leveraging the users interaction to define an ontology for medieval manuscripts, re-designing the front-end towards a new UX approach.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Preprint . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Miriam Baglioni; Alessia Bardi; Argiro Kokogiannaki; Paolo Manghi; Katerina Iatropoulou; Pedro Príncipe; André Vieira; Lars Holm Nielsen; Harry Dimitropoulos; Ioannis Foufoulas; +7 more
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing, CH-6330 Cham (ZG), CHE
    Countries: Italy, Portugal, Portugal
    Project: WT , EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), EC | OpenAIRE-Connect (731011), WT , EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), EC | OpenAIRE-Connect (731011)

    Despite the hype, the effective implementation of Open Science is hindered by several cultural and technical barriers. Researchers embraced digital science, use “digital laboratories” (e.g. research infrastructures, thematic services) to conduct their research and publish research data, but practices and tools are still far from achieving the expectations of transparency and reproducibility of Open Science. The places where science is performed and the places where science is published are still regarded as different realms. Publishing is still a post-experimental, tedious, manual process, too often limited to articles, in some contexts semantically linked to datasets, rarely to software, generally disregarding digital representations of experiments. In this work we present the OpenAIRE Research Community Dashboard (RCD), designed to overcome some of these barriers for a given research community, minimizing the technical efforts and without renouncing any of the community services or practices. The RCD flanks digital laboratories of research communities with scholarly communication tools for discovering and publishing interlinked scientific products such as literature, datasets, and software. The benefits of the RCD are show-cased by means of two real-case scenarios: the European Marine Science community and the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) research infrastructure. This work is partly funded by the OpenAIRE-Advance H2020 project (grant number: 777541; call: H2020-EINFRA-2017) and the OpenAIREConnect H2020 project (grant number: 731011; call: H2020-EINFRA-2016-1). Moreover, we would like to thank our colleagues Michele Manunta, Francesco Casu, and Claudio De Luca (Institute for the Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment, CNR, Italy) for their work on the EPOS infrastructure RCD; and Stephane Pesant (University of Bremen, Germany) his work on the European Marine Science RCD. First Online 30 August 2019

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wandl-Vogt, Eveline; Roberto Barbera; La Rocca, Giuseppe; Calanducci, Antonio; Carrubba, Carla; Inserra, Giuseppina; Kalman, Tibor; Sipos, Gergely; Farkas, Zoltan; Davidovic, Davor;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | EGI-Engage (654142)

    The paper introduces into a new Science Gateway, developed in the framework of the European Horizon 2020 project EGI Engage - DARIAH Competence Centre, which started in March 2015 co-funded by the European Union, with the participation of about 70 (research) units in over 30 countries. In this paper the authors focus on trans-disciplinary collaboration in the framework of explorative lexicography in cultural context. On the one hand, they give a short overview of the architecture of the Science Gateway, used techniques, and specific applications and services developed during the DARIAH Competence Centre. On the other they mainly focus on possible added value and changes concerning work flow for Lexicographers and researchers on Lexical resources. This is exemplified on the European network of COST action IS 1305 “European Network of electronic lexicography (ENeL)”.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    DataCloud Collaboration; Salomoni, Davide; Campos, Isabel; Gaido, Luciano; de Lucas, Jesus Marco; Solagna, Peter; Gomes, Jorge; Matyska, Ludek; Fuhrman, Patrick; Hardt, Marcus; +54 more
    Project: EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549)

    This paper describes the achievements of the H2020 project INDIGO-DataCloud. The project has provided e-infrastructures with tools, applications and cloud framework enhancements to manage the demanding requirements of scientific communities, either locally or through enhanced interfaces. The middleware developed allows to federate hybrid resources, to easily write, port and run scientific applications to the cloud. In particular, we have extended existing PaaS (Platform as a Service) solutions, allowing public and private e-infrastructures, including those provided by EGI, EUDAT, and Helix Nebula, to integrate their existing services and make them available through AAI services compliant with GEANT interfederation policies, thus guaranteeing transparency and trust in the provisioning of such services. Our middleware facilitates the execution of applications using containers on Cloud and Grid based infrastructures, as well as on HPC clusters. Our developments are freely downloadable as open source components, and are already being integrated into many scientific applications. 39 pages, 15 figures.Version accepted in Journal of Grid Computing

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davide Salomoni; Isabel Campos; Luciano Gaido; J. Marco de Lucas; P. Solagna; Jorge Gomes; Luděk Matyska; P. Fuhrman; Marcus Hardt; Giacinto Donvito; +43 more
    Countries: Italy, Netherlands, Netherlands, Spain, Croatia, Italy, Germany, Croatia, Italy, Croatia ...
    Project: EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549), EC | EOSC-hub (777536), EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549), EC | EOSC-hub (777536)

    This paper describes the achievements of the H2020 project INDIGO-DataCloud. The project has provided e-infrastructures with tools, applications and cloud framework enhancements to manage the demanding requirements of scientific communities, either locally or through enhanced interfaces. The middleware developed allows to federate hybrid resources, to easily write, port and run scientific applications to the cloud. In particular, we have extended existing PaaS (Platform as a Service) solutions, allowing public and private e-infrastructures, including those provided by EGI, EUDAT, and Helix Nebula, to integrate their existing services and make them available through AAI services compliant with GEANT interfederation policies, thus guaranteeing transparency and trust in the provisioning of such services. Our middleware facilitates the execution of applications using containers on Cloud and Grid based infrastructures, as well as on HPC clusters. Our developments are freely downloadable as open source components, and are already being integrated into many scientific applications. INDIGO-Datacloud has been funded by the European Commision H2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement RIA 653549. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Cinzia Ferrini;
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | DIAPREPP (202013)

    In her capacity as guest editor, the author introduces a set of essays examining the trends, risks, needs, pressures, and prospects of the humanities after recent reforms to tertiary education throughout Europe. By focusing on the educational, cultural, and social value of research in the humanities, which also provide economic and democratic benefits, this special issue focuses on three key topics: “funding policies”, “evaluation”, and “cultural resources”. This article provides the background to the subject matter (Section 1) the context and a synopsis of the contributions, showing how and why these position papers by members of the humanities cluster of the Academia Europaea can provide this debate with new tools of analysis and diagnosis (Section 5). Finally, the concluding remarks highlight the Academia Europaea’s actions for the humanities (Section 6). a reflection on the controversial issues of quality control, measures of research productivity, and funding decisions as key drivers changing the humanities (Section 2) an overview of the current difficulties and prospects for “modernizing” the humanities (Section 3) the rationale for this special issue (Section 4)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca; Bardi, Alessia; Manghi, Paolo; Pagano, Pasquale;
    Publisher: Caspur -Ciber Publishing, Roma , Italia
    Country: Italy
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    Digital Humanities Infrastructures (DHIs) are research infrastructures supporting researchers in the field of humanities by providing ICT tools and facilities for performing their studies and investigation activities. A DHI typically serves either researchers of one specific sector of humanities (e.g. history, archaeology) or focused research groups working on specific research topics (e.g. studies on the holocaust, on a specific manuscript), with little or no re-use of tools, services and data that could be shared and successfully adopted to answer research questions of different research disciplines. This fragmentation often represents a barrier to inter-disciplinary research collaborations. We present a technical framework for the federation of DHIs where tools, data, services, and knowledge available from each DHI are shared in an integrated environment where researchers can collaborate on specific research topics by creating customized Virtual Research Environments. 

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bridgette Wessels; Rachel Finn; Peter Linde; Paolo Mazzetti; Stefano Nativi; Susan Riley; Rod Smallwood; Mark J. Taylor; Victoria Tsoukala; Kush Wadhwa; +1 more
    Publisher: Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Biblioteket
    Countries: Sweden, Italy, Netherlands
    Project: EC | RECODE (321463), EC | DRIVER II (212147), EC | APARSEN (269977), EC | ETTIS (285593), EC | OPENAIRE (246686)

    This paper explores key issues in the development of open access to research data. The use of digital means for developing, storing and manipulating data is creating a focus on ‘data-driven science’. One aspect of this focus is the development of ‘open access’ to research data. Open access to research data refers to the way in which various types of data are openly available to public and private stakeholders, user communities and citizens. Open access to research data, however, involves more than simply providing easier and wider access to data for potential user groups. The development of open access requires attention to the ways data are considered in different areas of research. We identify how open access is being unevenly developed across the research environment and the consequences this has in terms of generating data gaps. Data gaps refer to the way data becomes detached from published conclusions. To address these issues, we examine four main areas in developing open access to research data: stakeholder roles and values; technological requirements for managing and sharing data; legal and ethical regulations and procedures; institutional roles and policy frameworks. We conclude that problems of variability and consistency across the open access ecosystem need to be addressed within and between these areas to ensure that risks surrounding a data gap are managed in open access. 11 authors. Missing: Sally Wyatt

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marica Antonacci; Alberto Brigandì; Miguel Caballer; Eva Cetinic; Davor Davidović; Giacinto Donvito; Germán Moltó; Davide Salomoni;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549), EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549)

    In the framework of the H2020 INDIGO-DataCloud project, we have implemented an advanced solution for the automatic deployment of digital data repositories based on Invenio, the digital library framework developed by CERN. Exploiting cutting-edge technologies, such as Docker and Apache Mesos, and standard specifications to describe application architectures such as TOSCA, we are able to provide a service that simplifies the process of creating and managing repositories of various digital assets using cloud resources. An Invenio-based repository consists of a set of services (e.g. database, message queue, cache, workers and frontend) that need to be properly installed, configured and linked together. These operations, along with the provisioning of the resources and their monitoring and maintenance, can be challenging for individual researchers or small-to-moderate-sized research groups. To this purpose, the INDIGO-DataCloud platform provides advanced features for orchestrating the deployment of complex virtual infrastructures on distributed cloud environments: it is able to provision the required resources automatically over heterogeneous and/or hybrid cloud infrastructures and to configure them automatically ensuring dynamic elasticity and resilience. This approach has been successfully adapted to support the needs of the researchers and scholars in the domain of the Digital Arts and Humanities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frank Uiterwaal; Franco Niccolucci; Sheena Bassett; Steven Krauwer; Hella Hollander; Femmy Admiraal; Laurent Romary; George Bruseker; Carlo Meghini; Jennifer Edmond; +1 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, France, Italy, France, Netherlands
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    This article has been accepted for publication by EUP in the IJHAC: International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing (https://www.euppublishing.com/loi/ijhac); International audience; Since the first ESFRI roadmap in 2006, multiple humanities Research Infrastructures (RIs) have been set up all over the European continent, supporting archaeologists (ARIADNE), linguists (CLARIN-ERIC), Holocaust researchers (EHRI), cultural heritage specialists (IPERION-CH) and others. These examples only scratch the surface of the breadth of research communities that have benefited from close cooperation in the European Research Area.While each field developed discipline-specific services over the years, common themes can also be distinguished. All humanities RIs address, in varying degrees, questions around research data management, the use of standards and the desired interoperability of data across disciplinary boundaries.This article sheds light on how cluster project PARTHENOS developed pooled services and shared solutions for its audience of humanities researchers, RI managers and policymakers. In a time where the convergence of existing infrastructure is becoming ever more important – with the construction of a European Open Science Cloud as an audacious, ultimate goal – we hope that our experiences inform future work and provide inspiration on how to exploit synergies in interdisciplinary, transnational, scientific cooperation.

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