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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davidović, Davor; Cetinić, Eva; Skala, Karolj;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | EGI-Engage (654142)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dallas, Costis;
    Publisher: CNR - Istituto di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale

    Research in theoretical and computer-based archaeology, from the 1950s onwards, established important perspectives for the formal representation and analysis of tangible cultural entities such as complex artefacts, iconographic compositions and archaeological assemblages, and became a precursor for the emergence of knowledge-based tools, methodologies and standards for artefact-centred information systems in contemporary museums. One particular case in point is CLIO, a semantic information system intended for research use, developed by ICS/FORTH and the Benaki Museum in Greece in the early 1990s, which became a foundation for the definition of the Conceptual Reference Model of the International Documentation Committee of ICOM (CIDOC CRM), recently adopted as the ISO standard for cultural information representation. It is argued here that, as the capabilities of computer applications to provide access to complex, multimedia cultural information increase, so does also the validity and importance of earlier research advances in artefact-centred archaeological computing; and, conversely, that the advent of digital infrastructures for material culture disciplines such as archaeology highlights the pertinence, and potential benefits, of further work on archaeological formal analysis and knowledge representation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Boukhelifa , Nadia; Giannisakis , Emmanouil; Dimara , Evanthia; Willett , Wesley; Fekete , Jean-Daniel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | CENDARI (284432)

    International audience; In this paper we describe the development and evaluation of a visual analytics tool to support historical research. Historians continuously gather data related to their scholarly research from archival visits and background search. Organising and making sense of all this data can be challenging as many historians continue to rely on analog or basic digital tools. We built an integrated note-taking environment for historians which unifies a set of func-tionalities we identified as important for historical research including editing, tagging, searching, sharing and visualization. Our approach was to involve users from the initial stage of brainstorming and requirement analysis through to design, implementation and evaluation. We report on the process and results of our work, and conclude by reflecting on our own experience in conducting user-centered visual analytics design for digital humanities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Nispen, Annelies;
    Country: Netherlands

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) started in October 2010 to build on a network that connects both people (Holocaust researchers, archivists, curators, librarians and digital humanists) and dispersed Holocaust source material and collections. EHRI’s aim is making sources visible in a systematic way in order to counteract the fragmentation of the sources and to reveal interconnections. EHRI focuses on Archive and collection descriptions, which are available through the EHRI Portal. EHRI is currently in its second phase and is on the ESFRI Roadmap2 for a more sustainable future. EHRI has developed a set of controlled vocabularies that serves both as a retrieval and cataloguing tool for the multilingual and highly heterogeneous data of the EHRI portal. These vocabularies were partly implemented in the first phase of the project. In the current phase of EHRI the vocabularies are in the process of quality improvement improve and enrich the existing terms, add new terms, disambiguate and remove the mistakes (deduplication, merging, adding multilingual labels, consistency checks, multiple parent relations, etc.) and increase their coverage. In the EHRI portal the subject terms are currently not available for the public, as they are used only for retrieval purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefan Bornhofen; Marten Düring;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: ANR | BLIZAAR (ANR-15-CE23-0002)

    AbstractThe paper presents Intergraph, a graph-based visual analytics technical demonstrator for the exploration and study of content in historical document collections. The designed prototype is motivated by a practical use case on a corpus of circa 15.000 digitized resources about European integration since 1945. The corpus allowed generating a dynamic multilayer network which represents different kinds of named entities appearing and co-appearing in the collections. To our knowledge, Intergraph is one of the first interactive tools to visualize dynamic multilayer graphs for collections of digitized historical sources. Graph visualization and interaction methods have been designed based on user requirements for content exploration by non-technical users without a strong background in network science, and to compensate for common flaws with the annotation of named entities. Users work with self-selected subsets of the overall data by interacting with a scene of small graphs which can be added, altered and compared. This allows an interest-driven navigation in the corpus and the discovery of the interconnections of its entities across time.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davidović, Davor; Cetinić, Eva; Skala, Karolj;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549), EC | EGI-Engage (654142)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Karlheinz Mörth; Laurent Romary; Gerhard Budin; Daniel Schopper;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: FWF | Arabic in the Middle Atla... (P 21722)

    International audience; Academic dictionary writing is making greater and greater use of the TEI Guidelines’ dictionary module. And as increasing numbers of TEI dictionaries become available, there is an ever more palpable need to work towards greater interoperability among dictionary writing systems and other language resources that are needed by dictionaries and dictionary tools. In particular this holds true for the crucial role that statistical data obtained from language resources play in lexicographic workflow—a role that also has to be reflected in the model of the data produced in these workflows. Presenting a range of current projects, the authors address two main questions in this area: How can the relationship between a dictionary and other language resources be conceptualized, irrespective of whether they are used in the production of the dictionary or to enrich existing lexicographic data? And how can this be documented using the TEI Guidelines? Discussing a variety of options, this paper proposes a customization of the TEI dictionary module that tries to respond to the emerging requirements in an environment of increasingly intertwined language resources.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anneke Zuiderwijk;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    This article describes how virtual research environments (VREs) offer new opportunities for researchers to analyse open data and to obtain new insights for policy making. Although various VRE-related initiatives are under development, there is a lack of insight into how VREs support collaborative open data analysis by researchers and how this might be improved, ultimately leading to input for policy making to solve societal issues. This article clarifies in which ways VREs support researchers in open data analysis. Seven cases presenting different modes of researcher support for open data analysis were investigated and compared. Four types of support were identified: 1) ‘Figure it out yourself', 2) ‘Leading users by the hand', 3) ‘Training to provide the basics' and 4) ‘Learning from peers'. The author provides recommendations to improve the support of researchers' open data analysis and to subsequently obtain new insights for policy making to solve societal challenges.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thierry Chanier; Céline Poudat; Benoît Sagot; Georges Antoniadis; Ciara Wigham; Linda Hriba; Julien Longhi; Djamé Seddah;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Final version to Special Issue of JLCL (Journal of Language Technology and Computational Linguistics (JLCL, http://jlcl.org/): BUILDING AND ANNOTATING CORPORA OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED DISCOURSE: Issues and Challenges at the Interface of Corpus and Computational Linguistics (ed. by Michael Beißwenger, Nelleke Oostdijk, Angelika Storrer & Henk van den Heuvel); International audience; The CoMeRe project aims to build a kernel corpus of different Computer-Mediated Com-munication (CMC) genres with interactions in French as the main language, by assembling interactions stemming from networks such as the Internet or telecommunication, as well as mono and multimodal, synchronous and asynchronous communications. Corpora are assem-bled using a standard, thanks to the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) format. This implies extending, through a European endeavor, the TEI model of text, in order to encompass the richest and the more complex CMC genres. This paper presents the Interaction Space model. We explain how this model has been encoded within the TEI corpus header and body. The model is then instantiated through the first four corpora we have processed: three corpora where interactions occurred in single-modality environments (text chat, or SMS systems) and a fourth corpus where text chat, email and forum modalities were used simultaneously. The CoMeRe project has two main research perspectives: Discourse Analysis, only alluded to in this paper, and the linguistic study of idiolects occurring in different CMC genres. As NLP algorithms are an indispensable prerequisite for such research, we present our motiva-tions for applying an automatic annotation process to the CoMeRe corpora. Our wish to guarantee generic annotations meant we did not consider any processing beyond morphosyn-tactic labelling, but prioritized the automatic annotation of any freely variant elements within the corpora. We then turn to decisions made concerning which annotations to make for which units and describe the processing pipeline for adding these. All CoMeRe corpora are verified, thanks to a staged quality control process, designed to allow corpora to move from one project phase to the next. Public release of the CoMeRe corpora is a short-term goal: corpora will be integrated into the forthcoming French National Reference Corpus, and disseminated through the national linguistic infrastructure ORTOLANG. We, therefore, highlight issues and decisions made concerning the OpenData perspective.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Preprint . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Miriam Baglioni; Alessia Bardi; Argiro Kokogiannaki; Paolo Manghi; Katerina Iatropoulou; Pedro Príncipe; André Vieira; Lars Holm Nielsen; Harry Dimitropoulos; Ioannis Foufoulas; +7 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Countries: Italy, Portugal
    Project: EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), WT , EC | OpenAIRE-Connect (731011)

    Despite the hype, the effective implementation of Open Science is hindered by several cultural and technical barriers. Researchers embraced digital science, use “digital laboratories” (e.g. research infrastructures, thematic services) to conduct their research and publish research data, but practices and tools are still far from achieving the expectations of transparency and reproducibility of Open Science. The places where science is performed and the places where science is published are still regarded as different realms. Publishing is still a post-experimental, tedious, manual process, too often limited to articles, in some contexts semantically linked to datasets, rarely to software, generally disregarding digital representations of experiments. In this work we present the OpenAIRE Research Community Dashboard (RCD), designed to overcome some of these barriers for a given research community, minimizing the technical efforts and without renouncing any of the community services or practices. The RCD flanks digital laboratories of research communities with scholarly communication tools for discovering and publishing interlinked scientific products such as literature, datasets, and software. The benefits of the RCD are show-cased by means of two real-case scenarios: the European Marine Science community and the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) research infrastructure. This work is partly funded by the OpenAIRE-Advance H2020 project (grant number: 777541; call: H2020-EINFRA-2017) and the OpenAIREConnect H2020 project (grant number: 731011; call: H2020-EINFRA-2016-1). Moreover, we would like to thank our colleagues Michele Manunta, Francesco Casu, and Claudio De Luca (Institute for the Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment, CNR, Italy) for their work on the EPOS infrastructure RCD; and Stephane Pesant (University of Bremen, Germany) his work on the European Marine Science RCD. First Online 30 August 2019

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
216 Research products, page 1 of 22
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davidović, Davor; Cetinić, Eva; Skala, Karolj;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | EGI-Engage (654142)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dallas, Costis;
    Publisher: CNR - Istituto di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale

    Research in theoretical and computer-based archaeology, from the 1950s onwards, established important perspectives for the formal representation and analysis of tangible cultural entities such as complex artefacts, iconographic compositions and archaeological assemblages, and became a precursor for the emergence of knowledge-based tools, methodologies and standards for artefact-centred information systems in contemporary museums. One particular case in point is CLIO, a semantic information system intended for research use, developed by ICS/FORTH and the Benaki Museum in Greece in the early 1990s, which became a foundation for the definition of the Conceptual Reference Model of the International Documentation Committee of ICOM (CIDOC CRM), recently adopted as the ISO standard for cultural information representation. It is argued here that, as the capabilities of computer applications to provide access to complex, multimedia cultural information increase, so does also the validity and importance of earlier research advances in artefact-centred archaeological computing; and, conversely, that the advent of digital infrastructures for material culture disciplines such as archaeology highlights the pertinence, and potential benefits, of further work on archaeological formal analysis and knowledge representation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Boukhelifa , Nadia; Giannisakis , Emmanouil; Dimara , Evanthia; Willett , Wesley; Fekete , Jean-Daniel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | CENDARI (284432)

    International audience; In this paper we describe the development and evaluation of a visual analytics tool to support historical research. Historians continuously gather data related to their scholarly research from archival visits and background search. Organising and making sense of all this data can be challenging as many historians continue to rely on analog or basic digital tools. We built an integrated note-taking environment for historians which unifies a set of func-tionalities we identified as important for historical research including editing, tagging, searching, sharing and visualization. Our approach was to involve users from the initial stage of brainstorming and requirement analysis through to design, implementation and evaluation. We report on the process and results of our work, and conclude by reflecting on our own experience in conducting user-centered visual analytics design for digital humanities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Nispen, Annelies;
    Country: Netherlands

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) started in October 2010 to build on a network that connects both people (Holocaust researchers, archivists, curators, librarians and digital humanists) and dispersed Holocaust source material and collections. EHRI’s aim is making sources visible in a systematic way in order to counteract the fragmentation of the sources and to reveal interconnections. EHRI focuses on Archive and collection descriptions, which are available through the EHRI Portal. EHRI is currently in its second phase and is on the ESFRI Roadmap2 for a more sustainable future. EHRI has developed a set of controlled vocabularies that serves both as a retrieval and cataloguing tool for the multilingual and highly heterogeneous data of the EHRI portal. These vocabularies were partly implemented in the first phase of the project. In the current phase of EHRI the vocabularies are in the process of quality improvement improve and enrich the existing terms, add new terms, disambiguate and remove the mistakes (deduplication, merging, adding multilingual labels, consistency checks, multiple parent relations, etc.) and increase their coverage. In the EHRI portal the subject terms are currently not available for the public, as they are used only for retrieval purposes.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefan Bornhofen; Marten Düring;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: ANR | BLIZAAR (ANR-15-CE23-0002)

    AbstractThe paper presents Intergraph, a graph-based visual analytics technical demonstrator for the exploration and study of content in historical document collections. The designed prototype is motivated by a practical use case on a corpus of circa 15.000 digitized resources about European integration since 1945. The corpus allowed generating a dynamic multilayer network which represents different kinds of named entities appearing and co-appearing in the collections. To our knowledge, Intergraph is one of the first interactive tools to visualize dynamic multilayer graphs for collections of digitized historical sources. Graph visualization and interaction methods have been designed based on user requirements for content exploration by non-technical users without a strong background in network science, and to compensate for common flaws with the annotation of named entities. Users work with self-selected subsets of the overall data by interacting with a scene of small graphs which can be added, altered and compared. This allows an interest-driven navigation in the corpus and the discovery of the interconnections of its entities across time.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davidović, Davor; Cetinić, Eva; Skala, Karolj;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549), EC | EGI-Engage (654142)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Karlheinz Mörth; Laurent Romary; Gerhard Budin; Daniel Schopper;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: FWF | Arabic in the Middle Atla... (P 21722)

    International audience; Academic dictionary writing is making greater and greater use of the TEI Guidelines’ dictionary module. And as increasing numbers of TEI dictionaries become available, there is an ever more palpable need to work towards greater interoperability among dictionary writing systems and other language resources that are needed by dictionaries and dictionary tools. In particular this holds true for the crucial role that statistical data obtained from language resources play in lexicographic workflow—a role that also has to be reflected in the model of the data produced in these workflows. Presenting a range of current projects, the authors address two main questions in this area: How can the relationship between a dictionary and other language resources be conceptualized, irrespective of whether they are used in the production of the dictionary or to enrich existing lexicographic data? And how can this be documented using the TEI Guidelines? Discussing a variety of options, this paper proposes a customization of the TEI dictionary module that tries to respond to the emerging requirements in an environment of increasingly intertwined language resources.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anneke Zuiderwijk;
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | VRE4EIC (676247)

    This article describes how virtual research environments (VREs) offer new opportunities for researchers to analyse open data and to obtain new insights for policy making. Although various VRE-related initiatives are under development, there is a lack of insight into how VREs support collaborative open data analysis by researchers and how this might be improved, ultimately leading to input for policy making to solve societal issues. This article clarifies in which ways VREs support researchers in open data analysis. Seven cases presenting different modes of researcher support for open data analysis were investigated and compared. Four types of support were identified: 1) ‘Figure it out yourself', 2) ‘Leading users by the hand', 3) ‘Training to provide the basics' and 4) ‘Learning from peers'. The author provides recommendations to improve the support of researchers' open data analysis and to subsequently obtain new insights for policy making to solve societal challenges.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thierry Chanier; Céline Poudat; Benoît Sagot; Georges Antoniadis; Ciara Wigham; Linda Hriba; Julien Longhi; Djamé Seddah;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Final version to Special Issue of JLCL (Journal of Language Technology and Computational Linguistics (JLCL, http://jlcl.org/): BUILDING AND ANNOTATING CORPORA OF COMPUTER-MEDIATED DISCOURSE: Issues and Challenges at the Interface of Corpus and Computational Linguistics (ed. by Michael Beißwenger, Nelleke Oostdijk, Angelika Storrer & Henk van den Heuvel); International audience; The CoMeRe project aims to build a kernel corpus of different Computer-Mediated Com-munication (CMC) genres with interactions in French as the main language, by assembling interactions stemming from networks such as the Internet or telecommunication, as well as mono and multimodal, synchronous and asynchronous communications. Corpora are assem-bled using a standard, thanks to the TEI (Text Encoding Initiative) format. This implies extending, through a European endeavor, the TEI model of text, in order to encompass the richest and the more complex CMC genres. This paper presents the Interaction Space model. We explain how this model has been encoded within the TEI corpus header and body. The model is then instantiated through the first four corpora we have processed: three corpora where interactions occurred in single-modality environments (text chat, or SMS systems) and a fourth corpus where text chat, email and forum modalities were used simultaneously. The CoMeRe project has two main research perspectives: Discourse Analysis, only alluded to in this paper, and the linguistic study of idiolects occurring in different CMC genres. As NLP algorithms are an indispensable prerequisite for such research, we present our motiva-tions for applying an automatic annotation process to the CoMeRe corpora. Our wish to guarantee generic annotations meant we did not consider any processing beyond morphosyn-tactic labelling, but prioritized the automatic annotation of any freely variant elements within the corpora. We then turn to decisions made concerning which annotations to make for which units and describe the processing pipeline for adding these. All CoMeRe corpora are verified, thanks to a staged quality control process, designed to allow corpora to move from one project phase to the next. Public release of the CoMeRe corpora is a short-term goal: corpora will be integrated into the forthcoming French National Reference Corpus, and disseminated through the national linguistic infrastructure ORTOLANG. We, therefore, highlight issues and decisions made concerning the OpenData perspective.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Preprint . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Miriam Baglioni; Alessia Bardi; Argiro Kokogiannaki; Paolo Manghi; Katerina Iatropoulou; Pedro Príncipe; André Vieira; Lars Holm Nielsen; Harry Dimitropoulos; Ioannis Foufoulas; +7 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Countries: Italy, Portugal
    Project: EC | OpenAIRE-Advance (777541), WT , EC | OpenAIRE-Connect (731011)

    Despite the hype, the effective implementation of Open Science is hindered by several cultural and technical barriers. Researchers embraced digital science, use “digital laboratories” (e.g. research infrastructures, thematic services) to conduct their research and publish research data, but practices and tools are still far from achieving the expectations of transparency and reproducibility of Open Science. The places where science is performed and the places where science is published are still regarded as different realms. Publishing is still a post-experimental, tedious, manual process, too often limited to articles, in some contexts semantically linked to datasets, rarely to software, generally disregarding digital representations of experiments. In this work we present the OpenAIRE Research Community Dashboard (RCD), designed to overcome some of these barriers for a given research community, minimizing the technical efforts and without renouncing any of the community services or practices. The RCD flanks digital laboratories of research communities with scholarly communication tools for discovering and publishing interlinked scientific products such as literature, datasets, and software. The benefits of the RCD are show-cased by means of two real-case scenarios: the European Marine Science community and the European Plate Observing System (EPOS) research infrastructure. This work is partly funded by the OpenAIRE-Advance H2020 project (grant number: 777541; call: H2020-EINFRA-2017) and the OpenAIREConnect H2020 project (grant number: 731011; call: H2020-EINFRA-2016-1). Moreover, we would like to thank our colleagues Michele Manunta, Francesco Casu, and Claudio De Luca (Institute for the Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment, CNR, Italy) for their work on the EPOS infrastructure RCD; and Stephane Pesant (University of Bremen, Germany) his work on the European Marine Science RCD. First Online 30 August 2019

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