Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
11 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Publications
  • Open Access
  • DE
  • English
  • DARIAH EU

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Publication . Other literature type . Part of book or chapter of book . 2011
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hogenaar, A; Tjalsma, H.D.; Priddy, M.; Meier zu Verl, C.; Horstmann, W.;
    Publisher: Universitaetsbibliothek Bielefeld
    Countries: Netherlands, Germany

    The social sciences and the humanities taken together contain a heterogeneous range of research disciplines. Almost all existing methods of research can be found within these two domains. Data handling (collecting, processing, selecting, preserving) and publication methods differ greatly. Attitudes in the field towards Open Access of publications as well to research data vary as well. It is not possible to cover the total fullness, and complexity, of all the disciplines within these two domains. Our observations will therefore be based upon a number of case studies. Taken together these case studies give a fairly representative picture of the domains, at least of the most common research environments. The main dividing line is between those disciplines creating empirical data, such as survey data in the social sciences and those, especially in the humanities, using existing source material, such as history or text studies. This source material can either be of an analogous or a digital nature. As will be shown in the case studies in many disciplines a mix of created and existing is often combined.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wandl-Vogt, Eveline; Roberto Barbera; La Rocca, Giuseppe; Calanducci, Antonio; Carrubba, Carla; Inserra, Giuseppina; Kalman, Tibor; Sipos, Gergely; Farkas, Zoltan; Davidovic, Davor;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | EGI-Engage (654142)

    The paper introduces into a new Science Gateway, developed in the framework of the European Horizon 2020 project EGI Engage - DARIAH Competence Centre, which started in March 2015 co-funded by the European Union, with the participation of about 70 (research) units in over 30 countries. In this paper the authors focus on trans-disciplinary collaboration in the framework of explorative lexicography in cultural context. On the one hand, they give a short overview of the architecture of the Science Gateway, used techniques, and specific applications and services developed during the DARIAH Competence Centre. On the other they mainly focus on possible added value and changes concerning work flow for Lexicographers and researchers on Lexical resources. This is exemplified on the European network of COST action IS 1305 “European Network of electronic lexicography (ENeL)”.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Birgit Schmidt; Astrid Orth; Gwen Franck; Iryna Kuchma; Petr Knoth; Jose Carvalho;
    Countries: Portugal, Germany
    Project: EC | FOSTER (612425)

    Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as straightforward for all stakeholders. For example, what do research funders expect in terms of open access to publications and/or research data? Where and how to publish research data? How to ensure that research results are reproducible? These are all legitimate questions and, in particular, early career researchers may benefit from additional guidance and training. In this paper we review the activities of the European-funded FOSTER project which organized and supported a wide range of targeted trainings for open science, based on face-to-face events and on a growing suite of e-learning courses. This article reviews the approach and experiences gained from the first two years of the project. The FOSTER project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 612425. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of all project partners to the design and implementation of the FOSTER project.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nadia Boukhelifa; Michael Bryant; Natasa Bulatovic; Ivan Čukić; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Milica Knežević; Jörg Lehmann; David I. Stuart; Carsten Thiel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | CENDARI (284432)

    International audience; The CENDARI infrastructure is a research-supporting platform designed to provide tools for transnational historical research, focusing on two topics: medieval culture and World War I. It exposes to the end users modern Web-based tools relying on a sophisticated infrastructure to collect, enrich, annotate, and search through large document corpora. Supporting researchers in their daily work is a novel concern for infrastructures. We describe how we gathered requirements through multiple methods to understand historians' needs and derive an abstract workflow to support them. We then outline the tools that we have built, tying their technical descriptions to the user requirements. The main tools are the note-taking environment and its faceted search capabilities; the data integration platform including the Data API, supporting semantic enrichment through entity recognition; and the environment supporting the software development processes throughout the project to keep both technical partners and researchers in the loop. The outcomes are technical together with new resources developed and gathered, and the research workflow that has been described and documented.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Norbert Lossau;
    Country: Germany

    Research infrastructures (RI) include major scientific equipment, scientific collections, archives, structured information and ICT-based infrastructures and services[3]. They support top-level research and can be organized at the national and regional level, at EU Member State, European and global level. RIs have become a topic of interest and priority for funders, political bodies, and (increasingly) institutional decision makers. In Europe the European Commission is a funder of RIs, complementing funding done by EU Member States at the national level. Over the last ten years hundreds of RI-projects have been planned and some received funding for design, extension and improvement of operations and services to scientific communities. The ESFRI[4] roadmap for research infrastructures represents a financial volume of approx. 20 billion EUR for ten years to construct 44 RIs. From the perspective of realizing the objectives set for RI, 2012 is an essential milestone, as the discussion of the HORIZON 2020 programmes at the European level will take place as well as consultations with member states. The following overview is by no means complete. It focuses on some RIs majorly influenced by the production and management of scientific information and which have relevance for the European political and funding agenda. RI projects include a variety of typologies, ranging from hard, single-site facilities to distributed, soft facilities relying on networks. Typically they have emerged from discipline-specific or cross-disciplinary requirements. RIs produce, process or manage big and small but heterogeneous volumes of information. They are the so-called ‘scientific data factories’ of the 21st century. They comprise various types of information resources such as publications, digitized collections, learning objects and research data. Key issues on today’s agenda for RIs are their uptake by researchers, and their viability, sustainability and interoperability. Research libraries’ engagement with RIs has been low. While this could be understandable in 2005 when the first priorities for RI investments were defined, it now represents a big gap in the European strategy. Key initiatives such as the ESFRI Research Infrastructures involve no participation by research libraries, except for DARIAH. Participation in EC-funded projects (through LIBER or directly through institutions) focused (with a few exceptions) on the areas of digitization, cultural heritage and publications. Research libraries need to become visible actors in strategic discussions on RIs and should actively explore their engagement in research data infrastructures. Open Access, open science (data), research data infrastructures and management are the catalysts to get research libraries back into the awareness of researchers beyond the humanities and social sciences. ‘Open Access is global — but implementation is local’. This is a popular slogan of the OpenAIRE project and gives local research libraries an important role in the European context. Research data are discipline-specific, but policies, workflows and standards also need to be implemented at the local level. Creating participatory infrastructures by involving institutional, national and disciplinary actors has been identified by the EC as a key task for the current decade. The term ‘participatory’ is also considered to be of fundamental relevance for European policy strategy, as it matches well with national and European coordination for cost efficiency and is instrumental in avoiding duplication of work. The primary challenges to building a coherent, fundable and sustainable ecosystem do not lie in ICT technology, but rather in governance, law, organization, socio- cultural aspects, trust, and, of course, costs. peerReviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Helene Brinken; Iryna Kuchma; Vasso Kalaitzi; Joy Davidson; Nancy Pontika; Matteo Cancellieri; Antónia Correia; José Carvalho; Remedios Melero; Damjana Kastelic; +7 more
    Countries: Portugal, Spain, Germany
    Project: EC | FOSTER Plus (741839)

    To foster responsible research and innovation, research communities, institutions, and funders are shifting their practices and requirements towards Open Science. Open Science skills are becoming increasingly essential for researchers. Indeed general awareness of Open Science has grown among EU researchers, but the practical adoption can be further improved. Recognizing a gap between the needed and the provided training offer, the FOSTER project offers practical guidance and training to help researchers learn how to open up their research within a particular domain or research environment. Aiming for a sustainable approach, FOSTER focused on strengthening the Open Science training capacity by establishing and supporting a community of trainers. The creation of an Open Science training handbook was a first step towards bringing together trainers to share their experiences and to create an open and living knowledge resource. A subsequent series of train-the-trainer bootcamps helped trainers to find inspiration, improve their skills and to intensify exchange within a peer group. Four trainers, who attended one of the bootcamps, contributed a case study on their experiences and how they rolled out Open Science training within their own institutions. On its platform the project provides a range of online courses and resources to learn about key Open Science topics. FOSTER awards users gamification badges when completing courses in order to provide incentives and rewards, and to spur them on to even greater achievements in learning. The paper at hand describes FOSTER Plus’ training strategies, shares the lessons learnt and provides guidance on how to re-use the project’s materials and training approaches. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davide Salomoni; Isabel Campos; Luciano Gaido; J. Marco de Lucas; P. Solagna; Jorge Gomes; Luděk Matyska; P. Fuhrman; Marcus Hardt; Giacinto Donvito; +43 more
    Publisher: Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg
    Countries: Croatia, Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Spain, Italy, Germany, Germany, Croatia, Italy
    Project: EC | EOSC-hub (777536), EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549)

    This paper describes the achievements of the H2020 project INDIGO-DataCloud. The project has provided e-infrastructures with tools, applications and cloud framework enhancements to manage the demanding requirements of scientific communities, either locally or through enhanced interfaces. The middleware developed allows to federate hybrid resources, to easily write, port and run scientific applications to the cloud. In particular, we have extended existing PaaS (Platform as a Service) solutions, allowing public and private e-infrastructures, including those provided by EGI, EUDAT, and Helix Nebula, to integrate their existing services and make them available through AAI services compliant with GEANT interfederation policies, thus guaranteeing transparency and trust in the provisioning of such services. Our middleware facilitates the execution of applications using containers on Cloud and Grid based infrastructures, as well as on HPC clusters. Our developments are freely downloadable as open source components, and are already being integrated into many scientific applications. INDIGO-Datacloud has been funded by the European Commision H2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement RIA 653549. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Duarte, Afonso M S; Psomopoulos, Fotis E; Blanchet, Christophe; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Corpas, Manuel; Franc, Alain; Jimenez, Rafael C; de Lucas, Jesus M; Nyrönen, Tommi; Sipos, Gergely; +3 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, France, Netherlands, Spain, France, France
    Project: WT , FCT | EXPL/BBB-BEP/1356/2013 (EXPL/BBB-BEP/1356/2013), EC | WENMR (261572), AKA | ELIXIR - Data for Life Eu... (273655), EC | BIOMEDBRIDGES (284209), FCT | SFRH/BPD/78075/2011 (SFRH/BPD/78075/2011), EC | EGI-INSPIRE (261323)

    With the increasingly rapid growth of data in life sciences we are witnessing a major transition in the way research is conducted, from hypothesis-driven studies to data-driven simulations of whole systems. Such approaches necessitate the use of large-scale computational resources and e-infrastructures, such as the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI). EGI, one of key the enablers of the digital European Research Area, is a federation of resource providers set up to deliver sustainable, integrated and secure computing services to European researchers and their international partners. Here we aim to provide the state of the art of Grid/Cloud computing in EU research as viewed from within the field of life sciences, focusing on key infrastructures and projects within the life sciences community. Rather than focusing purely on the technical aspects underlying the currently provided solutions, we outline the design aspects and key characteristics that can be identified across major research approaches. Overall, we aim to provide significant insights into the road ahead by establishing ever-strengthening connections between EGI as a whole and the life sciences community. AD was supported by Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal (SFRH/BPD/78075/2011 and EXPL/BBBBEP/1356/2013). FP has been supported by the National Grid Infrastructure NGI_GRNET, HellasGRID, as part of the EGI. IFB acknowledges funding from the “National Infrastructures in Biology and Health” call of the French “Investments for the Future” initiative. The WeNMR project has been funded by a European FP7 e-Infrastructure grant, contract no. 261572. AF was supported by a grant from Labex CEBA (Centre d’études de la Biodiversité Amazonienne) from ANR. MC is supported by UK’s BBSRC core funding. CSC was supported by Academy of Finland grant No. 273655 for ELIXIR Finland. The EGI-InSPIRE project (Integrated Sustainable Pan-European Infrastructure for Researchers in Europe) is co-funded by the European Commission (contract number: RI-261323). The BioMedBridges project is funded by the European Commission within Research Infrastructures of the FP7 Capacities Specific Programme, grant agreement number 284209. This is an open-access article.-- et al. Peer Reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jacobs, Arthur M.;

    This paper describes a corpus of about 3000 English literary texts with about 250 million words extracted from the Gutenberg project that span a range of genres from both fiction and non-fiction written by more than 130 authors (e.g., Darwin, Dickens, Shakespeare). Quantitative Narrative Analysis (QNA) is used to explore a cleaned subcorpus, the Gutenberg English Poetry Corpus (GEPC) which comprises over 100 poetic texts with around 2 million words from about 50 authors (e.g., Keats, Joyce, Wordsworth). Some exemplary QNA studies show author similarities based on latent semantic analysis, significant topics for each author or various text-analytic metrics for George Eliot's poem 'How Lisa Loved the King' and James Joyce's 'Chamber Music', concerning e.g. lexical diversity or sentiment analysis. The GEPC is particularly suited for research in Digital Humanities, Natural Language Processing or Neurocognitive Poetics, e.g. as training and test corpus, or for stimulus development and control. 27 pages, 4 figures

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sander Münster; Piotr Kuroczynski; Mieke Pfarr-Harfst; M. Grellert; Dominik Lengyel;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications

    Abstract. The workgroup for Digital Reconstruction of the Digital Humanities in the German-speaking area association (Digital Humanities im deutschsprachigen Raum e.V.) was founded in 2014 as cross-disciplinary scientific society dealing with all aspects of digital reconstruction of cultural heritage and currently involves more than 40 German researchers. Moreover, the workgroup is dedicated to synchronise and foster methodological research for these topics. As one preliminary result a memorandum was created to name urgent research challenges and prospects in a condensed way and assemble a research agenda which could propose demands for further research and development activities within the next years. The version presented within this paper was originally created as a contribution to the so-called agenda development process initiated by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in 2014 and has been amended during a joint meeting of the digital reconstruction workgroup in November 2014.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
11 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Publication . Other literature type . Part of book or chapter of book . 2011
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hogenaar, A; Tjalsma, H.D.; Priddy, M.; Meier zu Verl, C.; Horstmann, W.;
    Publisher: Universitaetsbibliothek Bielefeld
    Countries: Netherlands, Germany

    The social sciences and the humanities taken together contain a heterogeneous range of research disciplines. Almost all existing methods of research can be found within these two domains. Data handling (collecting, processing, selecting, preserving) and publication methods differ greatly. Attitudes in the field towards Open Access of publications as well to research data vary as well. It is not possible to cover the total fullness, and complexity, of all the disciplines within these two domains. Our observations will therefore be based upon a number of case studies. Taken together these case studies give a fairly representative picture of the domains, at least of the most common research environments. The main dividing line is between those disciplines creating empirical data, such as survey data in the social sciences and those, especially in the humanities, using existing source material, such as history or text studies. This source material can either be of an analogous or a digital nature. As will be shown in the case studies in many disciplines a mix of created and existing is often combined.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wandl-Vogt, Eveline; Roberto Barbera; La Rocca, Giuseppe; Calanducci, Antonio; Carrubba, Carla; Inserra, Giuseppina; Kalman, Tibor; Sipos, Gergely; Farkas, Zoltan; Davidovic, Davor;
    Country: Croatia
    Project: EC | EGI-Engage (654142)

    The paper introduces into a new Science Gateway, developed in the framework of the European Horizon 2020 project EGI Engage - DARIAH Competence Centre, which started in March 2015 co-funded by the European Union, with the participation of about 70 (research) units in over 30 countries. In this paper the authors focus on trans-disciplinary collaboration in the framework of explorative lexicography in cultural context. On the one hand, they give a short overview of the architecture of the Science Gateway, used techniques, and specific applications and services developed during the DARIAH Competence Centre. On the other they mainly focus on possible added value and changes concerning work flow for Lexicographers and researchers on Lexical resources. This is exemplified on the European network of COST action IS 1305 “European Network of electronic lexicography (ENeL)”.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Birgit Schmidt; Astrid Orth; Gwen Franck; Iryna Kuchma; Petr Knoth; Jose Carvalho;
    Countries: Portugal, Germany
    Project: EC | FOSTER (612425)

    Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as straightforward for all stakeholders. For example, what do research funders expect in terms of open access to publications and/or research data? Where and how to publish research data? How to ensure that research results are reproducible? These are all legitimate questions and, in particular, early career researchers may benefit from additional guidance and training. In this paper we review the activities of the European-funded FOSTER project which organized and supported a wide range of targeted trainings for open science, based on face-to-face events and on a growing suite of e-learning courses. This article reviews the approach and experiences gained from the first two years of the project. The FOSTER project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 612425. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of all project partners to the design and implementation of the FOSTER project.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nadia Boukhelifa; Michael Bryant; Natasa Bulatovic; Ivan Čukić; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Milica Knežević; Jörg Lehmann; David I. Stuart; Carsten Thiel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | CENDARI (284432)

    International audience; The CENDARI infrastructure is a research-supporting platform designed to provide tools for transnational historical research, focusing on two topics: medieval culture and World War I. It exposes to the end users modern Web-based tools relying on a sophisticated infrastructure to collect, enrich, annotate, and search through large document corpora. Supporting researchers in their daily work is a novel concern for infrastructures. We describe how we gathered requirements through multiple methods to understand historians' needs and derive an abstract workflow to support them. We then outline the tools that we have built, tying their technical descriptions to the user requirements. The main tools are the note-taking environment and its faceted search capabilities; the data integration platform including the Data API, supporting semantic enrichment through entity recognition; and the environment supporting the software development processes throughout the project to keep both technical partners and researchers in the loop. The outcomes are technical together with new resources developed and gathered, and the research workflow that has been described and documented.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Norbert Lossau;
    Country: Germany

    Research infrastructures (RI) include major scientific equipment, scientific collections, archives, structured information and ICT-based infrastructures and services[3]. They support top-level research and can be organized at the national and regional level, at EU Member State, European and global level. RIs have become a topic of interest and priority for funders, political bodies, and (increasingly) institutional decision makers. In Europe the European Commission is a funder of RIs, complementing funding done by EU Member States at the national level. Over the last ten years hundreds of RI-projects have been planned and some received funding for design, extension and improvement of operations and services to scientific communities. The ESFRI[4] roadmap for research infrastructures represents a financial volume of approx. 20 billion EUR for ten years to construct 44 RIs. From the perspective of realizing the objectives set for RI, 2012 is an essential milestone, as the discussion of the HORIZON 2020 programmes at the European level will take place as well as consultations with member states. The following overview is by no means complete. It focuses on some RIs majorly influenced by the production and management of scientific information and which have relevance for the European political and funding agenda. RI projects include a variety of typologies, ranging from hard, single-site facilities to distributed, soft facilities relying on networks. Typically they have emerged from discipline-specific or cross-disciplinary requirements. RIs produce, process or manage big and small but heterogeneous volumes of information. They are the so-called ‘scientific data factories’ of the 21st century. They comprise various types of information resources such as publications, digitized collections, learning objects and research data. Key issues on today’s agenda for RIs are their uptake by researchers, and their viability, sustainability and interoperability. Research libraries’ engagement with RIs has been low. While this could be understandable in 2005 when the first priorities for RI investments were defined, it now represents a big gap in the European strategy. Key initiatives such as the ESFRI Research Infrastructures involve no participation by research libraries, except for DARIAH. Participation in EC-funded projects (through LIBER or directly through institutions) focused (with a few exceptions) on the areas of digitization, cultural heritage and publications. Research libraries need to become visible actors in strategic discussions on RIs and should actively explore their engagement in research data infrastructures. Open Access, open science (data), research data infrastructures and management are the catalysts to get research libraries back into the awareness of researchers beyond the humanities and social sciences. ‘Open Access is global — but implementation is local’. This is a popular slogan of the OpenAIRE project and gives local research libraries an important role in the European context. Research data are discipline-specific, but policies, workflows and standards also need to be implemented at the local level. Creating participatory infrastructures by involving institutional, national and disciplinary actors has been identified by the EC as a key task for the current decade. The term ‘participatory’ is also considered to be of fundamental relevance for European policy strategy, as it matches well with national and European coordination for cost efficiency and is instrumental in avoiding duplication of work. The primary challenges to building a coherent, fundable and sustainable ecosystem do not lie in ICT technology, but rather in governance, law, organization, socio- cultural aspects, trust, and, of course, costs. peerReviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Helene Brinken; Iryna Kuchma; Vasso Kalaitzi; Joy Davidson; Nancy Pontika; Matteo Cancellieri; Antónia Correia; José Carvalho; Remedios Melero; Damjana Kastelic; +7 more
    Countries: Portugal, Spain, Germany
    Project: EC | FOSTER Plus (741839)

    To foster responsible research and innovation, research communities, institutions, and funders are shifting their practices and requirements towards Open Science. Open Science skills are becoming increasingly essential for researchers. Indeed general awareness of Open Science has grown among EU researchers, but the practical adoption can be further improved. Recognizing a gap between the needed and the provided training offer, the FOSTER project offers practical guidance and training to help researchers learn how to open up their research within a particular domain or research environment. Aiming for a sustainable approach, FOSTER focused on strengthening the Open Science training capacity by establishing and supporting a community of trainers. The creation of an Open Science training handbook was a first step towards bringing together trainers to share their experiences and to create an open and living knowledge resource. A subsequent series of train-the-trainer bootcamps helped trainers to find inspiration, improve their skills and to intensify exchange within a peer group. Four trainers, who attended one of the bootcamps, contributed a case study on their experiences and how they rolled out Open Science training within their own institutions. On its platform the project provides a range of online courses and resources to learn about key Open Science topics. FOSTER awards users gamification badges when completing courses in order to provide incentives and rewards, and to spur them on to even greater achievements in learning. The paper at hand describes FOSTER Plus’ training strategies, shares the lessons learnt and provides guidance on how to re-use the project’s materials and training approaches. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Davide Salomoni; Isabel Campos; Luciano Gaido; J. Marco de Lucas; P. Solagna; Jorge Gomes; Luděk Matyska; P. Fuhrman; Marcus Hardt; Giacinto Donvito; +43 more
    Publisher: Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg
    Countries: Croatia, Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Spain, Italy, Germany, Germany, Croatia, Italy
    Project: EC | EOSC-hub (777536), EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549)

    This paper describes the achievements of the H2020 project INDIGO-DataCloud. The project has provided e-infrastructures with tools, applications and cloud framework enhancements to manage the demanding requirements of scientific communities, either locally or through enhanced interfaces. The middleware developed allows to federate hybrid resources, to easily write, port and run scientific applications to the cloud. In particular, we have extended existing PaaS (Platform as a Service) solutions, allowing public and private e-infrastructures, including those provided by EGI, EUDAT, and Helix Nebula, to integrate their existing services and make them available through AAI services compliant with GEANT interfederation policies, thus guaranteeing transparency and trust in the provisioning of such services. Our middleware facilitates the execution of applications using containers on Cloud and Grid based infrastructures, as well as on HPC clusters. Our developments are freely downloadable as open source components, and are already being integrated into many scientific applications. INDIGO-Datacloud has been funded by the European Commision H2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement RIA 653549. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Duarte, Afonso M S; Psomopoulos, Fotis E; Blanchet, Christophe; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Corpas, Manuel; Franc, Alain; Jimenez, Rafael C; de Lucas, Jesus M; Nyrönen, Tommi; Sipos, Gergely; +3 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, France, Netherlands, Spain, France, France
    Project: WT , FCT | EXPL/BBB-BEP/1356/2013 (EXPL/BBB-BEP/1356/2013), EC | WENMR (261572), AKA | ELIXIR - Data for Life Eu... (273655), EC | BIOMEDBRIDGES (284209), FCT | SFRH/BPD/78075/2011 (SFRH/BPD/78075/2011), EC | EGI-INSPIRE (261323)

    With the increasingly rapid growth of data in life sciences we are witnessing a major transition in the way research is conducted, from hypothesis-driven studies to data-driven simulations of whole systems. Such approaches necessitate the use of large-scale computational resources and e-infrastructures, such as the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI). EGI, one of key the enablers of the digital European Research Area, is a federation of resource providers set up to deliver sustainable, integrated and secure computing services to European researchers and their international partners. Here we aim to provide the state of the art of Grid/Cloud computing in EU research as viewed from within the field of life sciences, focusing on key infrastructures and projects within the life sciences community. Rather than focusing purely on the technical aspects underlying the currently provided solutions, we outline the design aspects and key characteristics that can be identified across major research approaches. Overall, we aim to provide significant insights into the road ahead by establishing ever-strengthening connections between EGI as a whole and the life sciences community. AD was supported by Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal (SFRH/BPD/78075/2011 and EXPL/BBBBEP/1356/2013). FP has been supported by the National Grid Infrastructure NGI_GRNET, HellasGRID, as part of the EGI. IFB acknowledges funding from the “National Infrastructures in Biology and Health” call of the French “Investments for the Future” initiative. The WeNMR project has been funded by a European FP7 e-Infrastructure grant, contract no. 261572. AF was supported by a grant from Labex CEBA (Centre d’études de la Biodiversité Amazonienne) from ANR. MC is supported by UK’s BBSRC core funding. CSC was supported by Academy of Finland grant No. 273655 for ELIXIR Finland. The EGI-InSPIRE project (Integrated Sustainable Pan-European Infrastructure for Researchers in Europe) is co-funded by the European Commission (contract number: RI-261323). The BioMedBridges project is funded by the European Commission within Research Infrastructures of the FP7 Capacities Specific Programme, grant agreement number 284209. This is an open-access article.-- et al. Peer Reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jacobs, Arthur M.;

    This paper describes a corpus of about 3000 English literary texts with about 250 million words extracted from the Gutenberg project that span a range of genres from both fiction and non-fiction written by more than 130 authors (e.g., Darwin, Dickens, Shakespeare). Quantitative Narrative Analysis (QNA) is used to explore a cleaned subcorpus, the Gutenberg English Poetry Corpus (GEPC) which comprises over 100 poetic texts with around 2 million words from about 50 authors (e.g., Keats, Joyce, Wordsworth). Some exemplary QNA studies show author similarities based on latent semantic analysis, significant topics for each author or various text-analytic metrics for George Eliot's poem 'How Lisa Loved the King' and James Joyce's 'Chamber Music', concerning e.g. lexical diversity or sentiment analysis. The GEPC is particularly suited for research in Digital Humanities, Natural Language Processing or Neurocognitive Poetics, e.g. as training and test corpus, or for stimulus development and control. 27 pages, 4 figures

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sander Münster; Piotr Kuroczynski; Mieke Pfarr-Harfst; M. Grellert; Dominik Lengyel;
    Publisher: Copernicus Publications

    Abstract. The workgroup for Digital Reconstruction of the Digital Humanities in the German-speaking area association (Digital Humanities im deutschsprachigen Raum e.V.) was founded in 2014 as cross-disciplinary scientific society dealing with all aspects of digital reconstruction of cultural heritage and currently involves more than 40 German researchers. Moreover, the workgroup is dedicated to synchronise and foster methodological research for these topics. As one preliminary result a memorandum was created to name urgent research challenges and prospects in a condensed way and assemble a research agenda which could propose demands for further research and development activities within the next years. The version presented within this paper was originally created as a contribution to the so-called agenda development process initiated by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in 2014 and has been amended during a joint meeting of the digital reconstruction workgroup in November 2014.

Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.