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  • Research data . Film . 2020 . Embargo End Date: 21 Feb 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video shows the Dashdawa Mongol activist Wang Yanhong singing a song at the site in Ulan Butun where the Jungarian Khan Galdan Boshugt was defeated by the Qing army. Entitled ‘Father’s Grassland, Mother’s River’ (父亲的草原母亲的河), the song was written by a famous Mongolian diaspora poetess called Xi Murong. Through this song, Wang grieves his loss of the Mongolian culture and language, but insists that he is still a son of the steppe. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2020 . Embargo End Date: 21 Feb 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    The Dashdawa Mongol Studies Centre was established in 2014 by Wang Yanhong at the Chengde Normal College for Nationalities. The office contains some books related to the Dashdawa Mongols including photos he took with the Ööld Mongols in Zhaosu county of Xinjiang. He says that he wants to promote a close connection with those people via academic work and cultural exchanges, a wish also shared by other Dashdawa Mongols in Chengde. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video shows the Dashdawa Mongols and Oirat scholars getting together at the Anyuan Monastery celebrating their eastward migration 256 years earlier. The monastery was built for their ancestors in 1764. As shown, apart from members of the five main Dashdawa Mongol surname groups, Du, Zhao, Xu, Kou and Bai, there were also Ööld Mongols from Xinjiang attending the ceremony. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video shows Wang Yanhong, the Dashdawa Mongol activist, building an oboo with his relatives at the spot of the former Mongol Camp in Chengde. A couple of years ago, the Mongol Camp was demolished in a campaign called ‘Big Change in Three Years’ (三年大变样). In August 2015, Wang convened a conference in Chengde marking the 256th anniversary of the easterly migration of the Dashdawa Mongols (承德市达什达瓦蒙古东迁256年研讨会) which was attended by scholars from Xinjiang, Beijing and other places. Using this occasion, Wang and his relatives put up a temporary oboo as shown in the video. He says that he modelled it after oboos he saw in Zhaosu county in Ili, their ancestral homeland. After completing the construction, Wang Yanhong taught his family members customs of oboo worship, such as burning incense, circumambulating the oboo clockwise three times, and adding stones to the oboo. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    According to the discussion conducted by Dashdawa Mongol representatives in the video, they have always been officially recognised as Mongol since the Qing period till today. During the Cultural Revolution, however, under pressure, many Mongols changed their nationality registration to Han Nationality. Kou Zixin is one of the people who changed their nationality register, but he wants to change it back to Mongolian. He says it is a complicated process requiring a lot of certification. Wang Yanhong, however, successfully restored his nationality to Mongolian, which now appears on his ID card. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2015 . Embargo End Date: 21 Feb 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video is about the life experience of two extended families of the Dashdawa Mongols in Chengde: Zhao and Du. Du Jinsheng’s grandfather was called Du Batu and was a member of the Bordered Blue Banner (镶蓝旗). Zhao Zhixun says his ancestors worked as tomb guards (看堆子). Both of them were sent to Inner Mongolia to work at the newly built Baotou steel industry in 1957. They recall that when they were children, all the monasteries in Chengde were open to them; they only needed to say that ‘we are from the Mongol Camp (蒙古营的)’. Nowadays, however, they do not have any privilege to go into any monasteries. Besides, they say that there are no Dashdawa Mongol lamas. Most of the Mongol lamas are from Inner Mongolia. They also say that they are Mongols on ID cards only, because they are no different from the Han Chinese in terms of language and culture. Mixed marriages are also normal, because they do not distinguish Mongolians, Manchu or Han Chinese anymore. They have some misgivings about the government demolition of their home in the Mongol Camp. They think the government did it for the purpose of carrying out their campaign called ‘Big Change in Three Years’ (三年大变样). They recall that about 52 trucks came to the spot along with an ambulance in case anyone would get hurt in protect. In the end, the government made a contract with the people who lived in the Mongol Camp. It contained a clause promising that the residents could move into a new building within 22 months. However, they say that they have already lived in rented houses for six years, and the government provides them only 2,000 yuan per year per family as subsidies. They are pessimistic that they will ever live in new apartments, because the government no longer allows construction of new residential buildings in Chengde since it is now designated as a tourist city. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video shows Wang Yanhong explaining the Dashdawa Mongol history to the representatives of five Dashdawa Mongol surname groups. He says that initially, about 1,000 Ööld people arrived at Chengde in 1757, followed by another group two years later, the same year when the Anyuan monastery in Chengde was built. Some years later, however, about 500 people were dispatched to Xinjiang to protect the Qing-Russian border areas. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2015 . Embargo End Date: 21 Feb 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video focuses on the morning prayer session in the Puning monastery in Chengde. The Puning monastery is the only monastery that has Mongol lamas and holds regular prayer sessions in Chengde. It has 60 resident lamas from Inner Mongolia and Qinghai province. It is fascinating to see some of the lay Chinese attendees chanting in the Chinese version of the sculptures, while the lamas chant in Tibetan. Most of those who attend the morning prayer sessions are however Mongols from the neighbouring Inner Mongolia. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2005
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Gowlland, Geoffrey;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Artist Zhao Jianghua making a "purple clay" teapot.

  • Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    In this video, Wang Yanhong talks about his effort to revive the Dashdawa Mongolian culture at present and his plan for the future. In 2010, at Wang Yanhong’s initiative, China Central Television made a documentary of the Dashdawa Mongols in the middle of the demolition of the Mongol Camp. In the following years, he has been actively collecting materials about the Ööld Mongols in Xinjiang. In 2014, he attended an Oirat Mongolian academic conference held in Zhaosu county, which is known as Mongol Küre (Mongol Camp), in the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture. During this trip, he visited local Ööld Mongols, meeting famous Jangar epic singers, and attending the Ööld Mongol oboo worshipping ceremony. In order to salvage the disappearing Dashdawa Mongol identity in Chengde, he established ‘the Dashdawa Mongol Studies Centre’ at the Hebei Normal College for Nationalities in Chengde where he works. Supported by the city government, Wang Yanhong made an Ööld oboo on the site of the demolished Mongol Camp. Oboos among the Ööld Mongols in Xinjiang, he explains, symbolise their pride as the protector of the Qing dynasty’s far western borderland, and the newly built oboo in Chengde is to mark that the Dashdawa Mongols came from Xinjiang and are related to the Ööld Mongols there. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
14 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Research data . Film . 2020 . Embargo End Date: 21 Feb 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video shows the Dashdawa Mongol activist Wang Yanhong singing a song at the site in Ulan Butun where the Jungarian Khan Galdan Boshugt was defeated by the Qing army. Entitled ‘Father’s Grassland, Mother’s River’ (父亲的草原母亲的河), the song was written by a famous Mongolian diaspora poetess called Xi Murong. Through this song, Wang grieves his loss of the Mongolian culture and language, but insists that he is still a son of the steppe. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2020 . Embargo End Date: 21 Feb 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    The Dashdawa Mongol Studies Centre was established in 2014 by Wang Yanhong at the Chengde Normal College for Nationalities. The office contains some books related to the Dashdawa Mongols including photos he took with the Ööld Mongols in Zhaosu county of Xinjiang. He says that he wants to promote a close connection with those people via academic work and cultural exchanges, a wish also shared by other Dashdawa Mongols in Chengde. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video shows the Dashdawa Mongols and Oirat scholars getting together at the Anyuan Monastery celebrating their eastward migration 256 years earlier. The monastery was built for their ancestors in 1764. As shown, apart from members of the five main Dashdawa Mongol surname groups, Du, Zhao, Xu, Kou and Bai, there were also Ööld Mongols from Xinjiang attending the ceremony. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video shows Wang Yanhong, the Dashdawa Mongol activist, building an oboo with his relatives at the spot of the former Mongol Camp in Chengde. A couple of years ago, the Mongol Camp was demolished in a campaign called ‘Big Change in Three Years’ (三年大变样). In August 2015, Wang convened a conference in Chengde marking the 256th anniversary of the easterly migration of the Dashdawa Mongols (承德市达什达瓦蒙古东迁256年研讨会) which was attended by scholars from Xinjiang, Beijing and other places. Using this occasion, Wang and his relatives put up a temporary oboo as shown in the video. He says that he modelled it after oboos he saw in Zhaosu county in Ili, their ancestral homeland. After completing the construction, Wang Yanhong taught his family members customs of oboo worship, such as burning incense, circumambulating the oboo clockwise three times, and adding stones to the oboo. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    According to the discussion conducted by Dashdawa Mongol representatives in the video, they have always been officially recognised as Mongol since the Qing period till today. During the Cultural Revolution, however, under pressure, many Mongols changed their nationality registration to Han Nationality. Kou Zixin is one of the people who changed their nationality register, but he wants to change it back to Mongolian. He says it is a complicated process requiring a lot of certification. Wang Yanhong, however, successfully restored his nationality to Mongolian, which now appears on his ID card. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2015 . Embargo End Date: 21 Feb 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video is about the life experience of two extended families of the Dashdawa Mongols in Chengde: Zhao and Du. Du Jinsheng’s grandfather was called Du Batu and was a member of the Bordered Blue Banner (镶蓝旗). Zhao Zhixun says his ancestors worked as tomb guards (看堆子). Both of them were sent to Inner Mongolia to work at the newly built Baotou steel industry in 1957. They recall that when they were children, all the monasteries in Chengde were open to them; they only needed to say that ‘we are from the Mongol Camp (蒙古营的)’. Nowadays, however, they do not have any privilege to go into any monasteries. Besides, they say that there are no Dashdawa Mongol lamas. Most of the Mongol lamas are from Inner Mongolia. They also say that they are Mongols on ID cards only, because they are no different from the Han Chinese in terms of language and culture. Mixed marriages are also normal, because they do not distinguish Mongolians, Manchu or Han Chinese anymore. They have some misgivings about the government demolition of their home in the Mongol Camp. They think the government did it for the purpose of carrying out their campaign called ‘Big Change in Three Years’ (三年大变样). They recall that about 52 trucks came to the spot along with an ambulance in case anyone would get hurt in protect. In the end, the government made a contract with the people who lived in the Mongol Camp. It contained a clause promising that the residents could move into a new building within 22 months. However, they say that they have already lived in rented houses for six years, and the government provides them only 2,000 yuan per year per family as subsidies. They are pessimistic that they will ever live in new apartments, because the government no longer allows construction of new residential buildings in Chengde since it is now designated as a tourist city. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video shows Wang Yanhong explaining the Dashdawa Mongol history to the representatives of five Dashdawa Mongol surname groups. He says that initially, about 1,000 Ööld people arrived at Chengde in 1757, followed by another group two years later, the same year when the Anyuan monastery in Chengde was built. Some years later, however, about 500 people were dispatched to Xinjiang to protect the Qing-Russian border areas. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2015 . Embargo End Date: 21 Feb 2020
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Apollo - University of Cambridge Repository
    Country: United Kingdom

    This video focuses on the morning prayer session in the Puning monastery in Chengde. The Puning monastery is the only monastery that has Mongol lamas and holds regular prayer sessions in Chengde. It has 60 resident lamas from Inner Mongolia and Qinghai province. It is fascinating to see some of the lay Chinese attendees chanting in the Chinese version of the sculptures, while the lamas chant in Tibetan. Most of those who attend the morning prayer sessions are however Mongols from the neighbouring Inner Mongolia. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

  • Research data . Film . 2005
    Chinese
    Authors: 
    Gowlland, Geoffrey;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Artist Zhao Jianghua making a "purple clay" teapot.

  • Chinese
    Authors: 
    Bulag, Uradyn E.; Burunsain, Borjigin; Dorjraa;
    Publisher: Kalmyk Cultural Heritage Documentation Project, University of Cambridge
    Country: United Kingdom

    In this video, Wang Yanhong talks about his effort to revive the Dashdawa Mongolian culture at present and his plan for the future. In 2010, at Wang Yanhong’s initiative, China Central Television made a documentary of the Dashdawa Mongols in the middle of the demolition of the Mongol Camp. In the following years, he has been actively collecting materials about the Ööld Mongols in Xinjiang. In 2014, he attended an Oirat Mongolian academic conference held in Zhaosu county, which is known as Mongol Küre (Mongol Camp), in the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture. During this trip, he visited local Ööld Mongols, meeting famous Jangar epic singers, and attending the Ööld Mongol oboo worshipping ceremony. In order to salvage the disappearing Dashdawa Mongol identity in Chengde, he established ‘the Dashdawa Mongol Studies Centre’ at the Hebei Normal College for Nationalities in Chengde where he works. Supported by the city government, Wang Yanhong made an Ööld oboo on the site of the demolished Mongol Camp. Oboos among the Ööld Mongols in Xinjiang, he explains, symbolise their pride as the protector of the Qing dynasty’s far western borderland, and the newly built oboo in Chengde is to mark that the Dashdawa Mongols came from Xinjiang and are related to the Ööld Mongols there. Sponsored by Arcadia Fund, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin

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