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  • Publications
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  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • Publikationer från KTH

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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    Part of book: ISBN 978-1-009-10023-6QC 20221219

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker; Dale, Brigt; Keeling, Arn; Larsen, Joan Nymand;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    Extractivism has been predominant in the Arctic since whaling and sealing campaigns began in the sixteenth century, followed by mining and drilling for oil and gas. In this chapter we present some of the main features of this ‘extractivist history’ of the circumpolar region. We organize this development along a set of themes. First, we explore the extractive frame of mind in Western thought and how it has continued to shape visions of the region. Second, we explore the material and social impacts of historical extractivism. Third, we use the theoretical lens of colonialism and decolonialism to understand the social and political relations, especially with aboriginal populations. Fourth, we examine the, often fraught, recent and contemporary debates around contemporary and future extractivism and its implications for the Arctic. The historical overview serves the purpose of providing a legible pattern from what is also a range of diverse and rich variations. A key finding is that extractivism is a lasting legacy and a path dependency of the region. At the same time resource extraction has many problematic sides that the seeking of new Arctic futures will have to deal with. QC 20221215Chapter in book: ISBN 978-1-009-10023-6

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sverker Sörlin;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    QC 20221219

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Adam Wickberg;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Country: Sweden

    This article presents the new theoretical concept of environing media, which is developed to offer critical insight into how processes of mediation affect how we perceive of, manage and use the environment. Building on the insight that the environment has been in a continuous slow process of change that is now escalating due to human impacts, the article sketches a history of how environmental change and mediation are intertwined. Taking the history of agriculture as a case for the theoretical development, it shows how the current digitization of farming and implementation of AI systems in precision agriculture is the last of a long series in which environmental mediation come to play a crucial role in the forging of human–Earth relations. The article thereby shows the complex interplay between knowing and changing the environment as media technologies produce new epistemologies that in turn produce new interventions. QC 20221227

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kirsten Thisted; Joan Nymand Larsen; Frank Sejersen;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    For decades, a post–Cold War narrative heralded a “new Arctic,” with melting ice and snow and accessible resources that would build sustainable communities. Today, large parts of the Arctic are still trapped in the path dependencies of past resource extraction. At the same time, the impetus for green transitions and a “new industrialism” spells opportunities to shift the development model and build new futures for Arctic residents and Indigenous peoples.This book examines the growing Arctic resource dilemma. It explores the “new extractivist paradigm” that posits transitioning the region’s longstanding role of delivering minerals, fossil energy, and marine resources to one providing rare earth elements, renewable power, wilderness tourism, and scientific knowledge about climate change. With chapters from a global, interdisciplinary team of researchers, new opportunities and their implications for Arctic communities and landscapes are discussed, alongside the pressures and uncertainties in a region under geopolitical and environmental stress. QC 20221219

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kerem Kaya; Emre Iseri; Wouter van der Wijngaart;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Sweden

    AbstractMagnetopolymers are of interest in smart material applications; however, changing their magnetic properties post synthesis is complicated. In this study, we introduce easily programmable polymer magnetic composites comprising 2D lattices of droplets of solid-liquid phase change material, with each droplet containing a single magnetic dipole particle. These composites are ferromagnetic with a Curie temperature defined by the rotational freedom of the particles above the droplet melting point. We demonstrate magnetopolymers combining high remanence characteristics with Curie temperatures below the composite degradation temperature. We easily reprogram the material between four states: (1) a superparamagnetic state above the melting point which, in the absence of an external magnetic field, spontaneously collapses to; (2) an artificial spin ice state, which after cooling forms either; (3) a spin glass state with low bulk remanence, or; (4) a ferromagnetic state with high bulk remanence when cooled in the presence of an external magnetic field. We observe the spontaneous emergence of 2D magnetic vortices in the spin ice and elucidate the correlation of these vortex structures with the external bulk remanence. We also demonstrate the easy programming of magnetically latching structures.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Joydeep Dutta; Johan Nordstrand;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Sweden

    Many works in capacitive deionization (CDI) use finite-element (FEM) simulations to investigate process behavior. Here, we present ELC, comprehensive software that integrates these methods with COMSOL Multiphysics. It can save significant time for common research questions in CDI operations and is well-suited for new research questions in complex and upscaled device designs. The ELC software has already been used for the simulation of time-varying desalination output, charge leakages, bipolar electrode devices, and stacks of over 100 CDI cells. Finally, we provide a video tutorial on how to use the software. In conclusion, ELC could be a strong software for aiding current and future research in electrochemical desalination. QC 20221123

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mustapha Habib; Annika Gram; Abdelghani Harrag; Qian Wang;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Sweden

    This paper presents a methodology for the analysis and simulation of the effect of operating large photovoltaic(PV) plants, in coordination, as static synchronous compensators (STATCOM). The goal is to improve voltageprofiles at different load nodes and reduce power losses in transmission lines. The proposed approach takes intoaccount the varying reactive power capacity in PV inverters, which depends on weather conditions.To implement the proposed method, proper Internet of Things (IoT) hardware and software solutions arerequired. In this context, the grid status and weather data need to be transmitted continuously, via wirelesscommunication technology, to an edge computer. Based on the transmitted data, and using the system mathe-matical model, an optimization algorithm is then responsible for finding out the optimal reactive power setpointfor each plant in real time.The proposed method is implemented and tested successfully using MATLAB platform with the MATPOWERIEEE 30-bus test grid model. When only five 20 MW PV plants are connected to different locations in the gridwith a penetration rate lower than 25 percent, the simulation shows the effectiveness of the optimal coordinationof PV plants to deal with the effect on the transmission grid of instantaneous operation of multiple loads. In thiscontext, a daily load profile of heat pumps, operating in winter scenario in multiple households, is approved. Animprovement up to 68 percent in the global voltage profiles in the load buses for one-day scenario is achieved.Furthermore, total accumulated active and reactive power losses are reduced by 24.1 percent. QC 20220808

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zheng Lu; Linus Hasselström; Göran Finnveden; Nils Johansson;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Sweden

    Plastic packaging is a major contributor to the environmental impacts associated with the linear plastic production and consumption system due to the prevalence of short-lived single-use plastic (SUP) packaging. Deposit-refund system (DRS), as an alternative policy instrument to Extended Producer Responsibility in waste management, is deemed as a potentially promising way to address the failure of the current plastic waste management and facilitate circular plastic packaging production and consumption for food contact use. In this paper, two DRS scenarios for recycling and reuse respectively are explored, with PET trays for food-grade use in Sweden in focus. Their costs and benefits are investigated relative to the business-as-usual scenario over a 25-year period. Results show that the costs are greater than the benefits for the recycling scenario but not for the reuse scenario and that the benefit-cost ratio (1,67) of the reuse scenario is 2.3 times as high as that (0,73) of the recycling scenario. The distributive analysis reveals major cost drivers such as deposit handling and recycling in the recycling case and deposit handling, dishwashing and packaging in the reuse case and major cost takers such as materials industry and hospitality/supermarkets in both scenarios. However, the results are uncertain, as is indicated by sensitivity analysis. Several parameters with high uncertainty are identified and highlighted for system development and innovation. QC 20221201

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fedra Vanhuyse; Shogofa Rezaie; Mathilda Englund; Julia Jokiaho; Maryna Henrysson; Karin André;
    Publisher: KTH, Energisystem
    Country: Sweden

    The circular economy (CE) model, where resources are kept "in the loop" for as long as possible through a series of reusing, remanufacturing, recycling, and recovery strategies, has been acclaimed for reducing the environmental impacts of our current economic model substantially and has therefore been supported by a wide range of policymakers as one solution to tackling climate change. However, how circular transitions in cities impact people has been rarely researched, and even less attention has been paid to the negative consequences of CE transitions. This paper presents the findings from a social impact assessment conducted in the city of Umeå, Sweden. We identified several negative impacts of a CE transition across seven social impact categories and explored three areas in depth with stakeholders in the city: employment, access to services and participation. We found that the negative impacts of the CE are perceived to be limited and that the CE interventions are mainly viewed as a win-win-win outcome, i.e., a win for the environment, the economy and people. This raises questions about the level to which societal consequences have been considered and whether all relevant stakeholders, in particular civil society, have participated in the design of the city's CE strategy. Our findings can inform other cities about possible negative consequences of CE transitions and provide insights into how to incorporate different stakeholders in the CE transition process to ensure that no one is left behind. QC 20221206 Urban Circularity Assessment Framework

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
17,138 Research products, page 1 of 1,714
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    Part of book: ISBN 978-1-009-10023-6QC 20221219

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker; Dale, Brigt; Keeling, Arn; Larsen, Joan Nymand;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    Extractivism has been predominant in the Arctic since whaling and sealing campaigns began in the sixteenth century, followed by mining and drilling for oil and gas. In this chapter we present some of the main features of this ‘extractivist history’ of the circumpolar region. We organize this development along a set of themes. First, we explore the extractive frame of mind in Western thought and how it has continued to shape visions of the region. Second, we explore the material and social impacts of historical extractivism. Third, we use the theoretical lens of colonialism and decolonialism to understand the social and political relations, especially with aboriginal populations. Fourth, we examine the, often fraught, recent and contemporary debates around contemporary and future extractivism and its implications for the Arctic. The historical overview serves the purpose of providing a legible pattern from what is also a range of diverse and rich variations. A key finding is that extractivism is a lasting legacy and a path dependency of the region. At the same time resource extraction has many problematic sides that the seeking of new Arctic futures will have to deal with. QC 20221215Chapter in book: ISBN 978-1-009-10023-6

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sverker Sörlin;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    QC 20221219

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Adam Wickberg;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Country: Sweden

    This article presents the new theoretical concept of environing media, which is developed to offer critical insight into how processes of mediation affect how we perceive of, manage and use the environment. Building on the insight that the environment has been in a continuous slow process of change that is now escalating due to human impacts, the article sketches a history of how environmental change and mediation are intertwined. Taking the history of agriculture as a case for the theoretical development, it shows how the current digitization of farming and implementation of AI systems in precision agriculture is the last of a long series in which environmental mediation come to play a crucial role in the forging of human–Earth relations. The article thereby shows the complex interplay between knowing and changing the environment as media technologies produce new epistemologies that in turn produce new interventions. QC 20221227

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kirsten Thisted; Joan Nymand Larsen; Frank Sejersen;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    For decades, a post–Cold War narrative heralded a “new Arctic,” with melting ice and snow and accessible resources that would build sustainable communities. Today, large parts of the Arctic are still trapped in the path dependencies of past resource extraction. At the same time, the impetus for green transitions and a “new industrialism” spells opportunities to shift the development model and build new futures for Arctic residents and Indigenous peoples.This book examines the growing Arctic resource dilemma. It explores the “new extractivist paradigm” that posits transitioning the region’s longstanding role of delivering minerals, fossil energy, and marine resources to one providing rare earth elements, renewable power, wilderness tourism, and scientific knowledge about climate change. With chapters from a global, interdisciplinary team of researchers, new opportunities and their implications for Arctic communities and landscapes are discussed, alongside the pressures and uncertainties in a region under geopolitical and environmental stress. QC 20221219

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Kerem Kaya; Emre Iseri; Wouter van der Wijngaart;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Country: Sweden

    AbstractMagnetopolymers are of interest in smart material applications; however, changing their magnetic properties post synthesis is complicated. In this study, we introduce easily programmable polymer magnetic composites comprising 2D lattices of droplets of solid-liquid phase change material, with each droplet containing a single magnetic dipole particle. These composites are ferromagnetic with a Curie temperature defined by the rotational freedom of the particles above the droplet melting point. We demonstrate magnetopolymers combining high remanence characteristics with Curie temperatures below the composite degradation temperature. We easily reprogram the material between four states: (1) a superparamagnetic state above the melting point which, in the absence of an external magnetic field, spontaneously collapses to; (2) an artificial spin ice state, which after cooling forms either; (3) a spin glass state with low bulk remanence, or; (4) a ferromagnetic state with high bulk remanence when cooled in the presence of an external magnetic field. We observe the spontaneous emergence of 2D magnetic vortices in the spin ice and elucidate the correlation of these vortex structures with the external bulk remanence. We also demonstrate the easy programming of magnetically latching structures.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Joydeep Dutta; Johan Nordstrand;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Sweden

    Many works in capacitive deionization (CDI) use finite-element (FEM) simulations to investigate process behavior. Here, we present ELC, comprehensive software that integrates these methods with COMSOL Multiphysics. It can save significant time for common research questions in CDI operations and is well-suited for new research questions in complex and upscaled device designs. The ELC software has already been used for the simulation of time-varying desalination output, charge leakages, bipolar electrode devices, and stacks of over 100 CDI cells. Finally, we provide a video tutorial on how to use the software. In conclusion, ELC could be a strong software for aiding current and future research in electrochemical desalination. QC 20221123

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mustapha Habib; Annika Gram; Abdelghani Harrag; Qian Wang;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Sweden

    This paper presents a methodology for the analysis and simulation of the effect of operating large photovoltaic(PV) plants, in coordination, as static synchronous compensators (STATCOM). The goal is to improve voltageprofiles at different load nodes and reduce power losses in transmission lines. The proposed approach takes intoaccount the varying reactive power capacity in PV inverters, which depends on weather conditions.To implement the proposed method, proper Internet of Things (IoT) hardware and software solutions arerequired. In this context, the grid status and weather data need to be transmitted continuously, via wirelesscommunication technology, to an edge computer. Based on the transmitted data, and using the system mathe-matical model, an optimization algorithm is then responsible for finding out the optimal reactive power setpointfor each plant in real time.The proposed method is implemented and tested successfully using MATLAB platform with the MATPOWERIEEE 30-bus test grid model. When only five 20 MW PV plants are connected to different locations in the gridwith a penetration rate lower than 25 percent, the simulation shows the effectiveness of the optimal coordinationof PV plants to deal with the effect on the transmission grid of instantaneous operation of multiple loads. In thiscontext, a daily load profile of heat pumps, operating in winter scenario in multiple households, is approved. Animprovement up to 68 percent in the global voltage profiles in the load buses for one-day scenario is achieved.Furthermore, total accumulated active and reactive power losses are reduced by 24.1 percent. QC 20220808

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zheng Lu; Linus Hasselström; Göran Finnveden; Nils Johansson;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Sweden

    Plastic packaging is a major contributor to the environmental impacts associated with the linear plastic production and consumption system due to the prevalence of short-lived single-use plastic (SUP) packaging. Deposit-refund system (DRS), as an alternative policy instrument to Extended Producer Responsibility in waste management, is deemed as a potentially promising way to address the failure of the current plastic waste management and facilitate circular plastic packaging production and consumption for food contact use. In this paper, two DRS scenarios for recycling and reuse respectively are explored, with PET trays for food-grade use in Sweden in focus. Their costs and benefits are investigated relative to the business-as-usual scenario over a 25-year period. Results show that the costs are greater than the benefits for the recycling scenario but not for the reuse scenario and that the benefit-cost ratio (1,67) of the reuse scenario is 2.3 times as high as that (0,73) of the recycling scenario. The distributive analysis reveals major cost drivers such as deposit handling and recycling in the recycling case and deposit handling, dishwashing and packaging in the reuse case and major cost takers such as materials industry and hospitality/supermarkets in both scenarios. However, the results are uncertain, as is indicated by sensitivity analysis. Several parameters with high uncertainty are identified and highlighted for system development and innovation. QC 20221201

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fedra Vanhuyse; Shogofa Rezaie; Mathilda Englund; Julia Jokiaho; Maryna Henrysson; Karin André;
    Publisher: KTH, Energisystem
    Country: Sweden

    The circular economy (CE) model, where resources are kept "in the loop" for as long as possible through a series of reusing, remanufacturing, recycling, and recovery strategies, has been acclaimed for reducing the environmental impacts of our current economic model substantially and has therefore been supported by a wide range of policymakers as one solution to tackling climate change. However, how circular transitions in cities impact people has been rarely researched, and even less attention has been paid to the negative consequences of CE transitions. This paper presents the findings from a social impact assessment conducted in the city of Umeå, Sweden. We identified several negative impacts of a CE transition across seven social impact categories and explored three areas in depth with stakeholders in the city: employment, access to services and participation. We found that the negative impacts of the CE are perceived to be limited and that the CE interventions are mainly viewed as a win-win-win outcome, i.e., a win for the environment, the economy and people. This raises questions about the level to which societal consequences have been considered and whether all relevant stakeholders, in particular civil society, have participated in the design of the city's CE strategy. Our findings can inform other cities about possible negative consequences of CE transitions and provide insights into how to incorporate different stakeholders in the CE transition process to ensure that no one is left behind. QC 20221206 Urban Circularity Assessment Framework

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