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  • 2018-2022
  • English
  • Hal-Diderot
  • COVID-19
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ugofilippo Basellini; Carlo Giovanni Camarda;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Italy was hit harshly by the Covid-19 pandemic, registering more than 35,000 Covid-19 deaths between February and July 2020. During this first wave of the epidemic, the virus spread unequally across the country, with northern regions witnessing more cases and deaths. We investigate demographic and socio-economic factors contributing to the diverse regional impact of the virus during the first wave. Using generalized additive mixed models, we find that Covid-19 mortality at regional level is negatively associated with the degree of intergenerational co-residence, number of intensive care unit beds per capita, and delay in the outbreak of the epidemic. Conversely, we do not find strong associations for several variables highlighted in recent literature, such as population density or the share of the population who are older or have at least one chronic disease. Our results underscore the importance of context-specific analysis for the study of a pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrew E. Clark; Conchita D'Ambrosio; Ilke Onur; Rong Zhu;
    Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
    Countries: Australia, France
    Project: EC | SHARE-DEV3 (676536), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | SHARE-COHESION (870628), EC | SERISS (654221)

    This paper examines the empirical relationship between individuals’ cognitive and non-cognitive abilities and COVID-19 compliance behaviors using cross-country data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). We find that both cognitive and non-cognitive skills predict responsible health behaviors during the COVID-19 crisis. Episodic memory is the most important cognitive skill, while conscientiousness and neuroticism are the most significant personality traits. There is also some evidence of a role for an internal locus of control in compliance. usc Refereed/Peer-reviewed

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Roger Frutos; Olivier Pliez; Laurent Gavotte; Christian Devaux;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 caused by SARS-CoV-2, the question of the origin of this virus has been a highly debated issue. Debates have been, and are still, very disputed and often violent between the two main hypotheses: a natural origin through the “spillover” model or a laboratory-leak origin. Tenants of these two options are building arguments often based on the discrepancies of the other theory. The main problem is that it is the initial question of the origin itself which is biased. Charles Darwin demonstrated in 1859 that all species are appearing through a process of evolution, adaptation and selection. There is no determined origin to any animal or plant species, simply an evolutionary and selective process in which chance and environment play a key role. The very same is true for viruses. There is no determined origin to viruses, simply also an evolutionary and selective process in which chance and environment play a key role. However, in the case of viruses the process is slightly more complex because the “environment” is another living organism. Pandemic viruses already circulate in humans prior to the emergence of a disease. They are simply not capable of triggering an epidemic yet. They must evolve in-host, i.e. in-humans, for that. The evolutionary process which gave rise to SARS-CoV-2 is still ongoing with regular emergence of novel variants more adapted than the previous ones. The real relevant question is how these viruses can emerge as pandemic viruses and what the society can do to prevent the future emergence of pandemic viruses.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Konstantin Mochalov; Pavel Samokhvalov; Galina Nifontova; T. Tsoi; Alyona Sukhanova; Igor Nabiev;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Abstract Fast, sensitive, high-throughput detection of coronavirus antigens at physiologically relevant levels is essential for population screening that could prevent epidemics such as the current COVID-19 global pandemic. Optical methods based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy are promising for this purpose because they ensure quick detection of even single biological molecules in a sample. For achieving such a high sensitivity, it is crucial to design SERS-active systems concentrating incident radiation into small sample volumes. Here, metal-dielectric cavities have been obtained through interaction of protein sulfhydryl groups with a SERS-active silver surface. The concentration of light in these cavities allows the differential detection of spike glycoprotein and nucleocapsid protein of SARS-COV-2, which are its key antigens, at physiologically relevant concentrations. The cavity Q-factor can be increased by additionally covering the dielectric protein film with a silver shell to form an ultrathin cavity, which provides an at least tenfold enhancement of the detection signal. The results could be used to design high-throughput systems for specific and sensitive detection of viral antigens and quick diagnosis of viral infections.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Karin E. Limburg; Françoise Daverat;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Abstract The global lockdowns brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic forced an immediate change in the way people moved about;namely, travel was slowed from a turbulent river to a trickle In-person meetings, often involving long-distance flights, were either canceled, postponed, or shifted over to virtual modes People who were unfamiliar with online meetings quickly became acquainted with them

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    A. Perciaccante; Alessia Coralli; Philippe Charlier;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Background: In the absence of a treatment still considered universally effective, and of a vaccine validated by the health authorities, we wanted to know which Catholic saint the European Christian community turned to in the event of infection with Covid-19 to request a miraculous healing. Methodology: An online survey was carried out on a sample of 1158 adults using social media tools. Results: All results are presented in this research, with a few saints in the majority, and some dictated by the symptomatology of the Covid-19 infection or the personalities of certain « doctor guru ». Conclusion: This medico-anthropological study is revealing the psychology of Western patients vis-à-vis the magic-religious means used in the fight against diseases, particularly in the epidemic/pandemic context.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sienna R. Craig; Nawang Gurung; Ross Perlin; Maya Daurio; Daniel Kaufman; Mark Turin; Kunchog Tseten;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Abstract This article analyzes the audio diaries of a Tibetan physician, originally from Amdo (Qinghai Province, China), now living in New York City. Dr. Kunchog Tseten describes his experiences during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, in spring and summer 2020, when Queens, New York—the location where he lives and works—was the “epicenter of the epicenter” of the novel coronavirus outbreak in the United States. The collaborative research project of which this diary is a part combines innovative methodological approaches to qualitative, ethnographic study during this era of social distancing with an attunement to the relationship between language, culture, and health care. Dr. Kunchog’s diary and our analysis of its contents illustrate the ways that Tibetan medicine and Tibetan cultural practices, including those emergent from Buddhism, have helped members of the Himalayan and Tibetan communities in New York City navigate this unprecedented moment with care and compassion.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leila Chassery; Gaëtan Texier; Vincent Pommier de Santi; Hervé Chaudet; Nathalie Bonnardel; Liliane Pellegrin;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    In late 2019, an epidemic of SARS-CoV-2 broke out in central China. Within a few months, this new virus had spread right across the globe, officially being classified as a pandemic on 11 March 2020. In France, which was also being affected by the virus, the government applied specific epidemiological management strategies and introduced unprecedented public health measures. This article describes the outbreak management system that was applied within the French military and, more specifically, analyzes an outbreak of COVID-19 that occurred on board a nuclear aircraft carrier. We applied the AcciMap systemic analysis approach to understand the course of events that led to the outbreak and identify the relevant human and organizational failures. Results highlight causal factors at several levels of the outbreak management system. They reveal problems with the benchmarks used for diagnosis and decision-making, and underscore the importance of good communication between different levels. We discuss ways of improving epidemiological management in military context.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dan Laffoley; John M. Baxter; Diva J. Amon; Joachim Claudet; Jason M. Hall-Spencer; Kirsten Grorud-Colvert; Lisa A. Levin; P. Chris Reid; Alex Rogers; Michelle L. Taylor; +2 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United Kingdom, United States, France

    Author(s): Laffoley, Dan; Baxter, John M; Amon, Diva J; Claudet, Joachim; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Grorud-Colvert, Kirsten; Levin, Lisa A; Reid, P Chris; Rogers, Alex D; Taylor, Michelle L; Woodall, Lucy C; Andersen, Natalie F

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Van Thuan Hoang; Ndiaw Goumballa; Jaffar A. Al-Tawfiq; Cheick Sokhna; Philippe Gautret;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
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Include:
38 Research products, page 1 of 4
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ugofilippo Basellini; Carlo Giovanni Camarda;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Italy was hit harshly by the Covid-19 pandemic, registering more than 35,000 Covid-19 deaths between February and July 2020. During this first wave of the epidemic, the virus spread unequally across the country, with northern regions witnessing more cases and deaths. We investigate demographic and socio-economic factors contributing to the diverse regional impact of the virus during the first wave. Using generalized additive mixed models, we find that Covid-19 mortality at regional level is negatively associated with the degree of intergenerational co-residence, number of intensive care unit beds per capita, and delay in the outbreak of the epidemic. Conversely, we do not find strong associations for several variables highlighted in recent literature, such as population density or the share of the population who are older or have at least one chronic disease. Our results underscore the importance of context-specific analysis for the study of a pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrew E. Clark; Conchita D'Ambrosio; Ilke Onur; Rong Zhu;
    Publisher: Elsevier B.V.
    Countries: Australia, France
    Project: EC | SHARE-DEV3 (676536), EC | SSHOC (823782), EC | SHARE-COHESION (870628), EC | SERISS (654221)

    This paper examines the empirical relationship between individuals’ cognitive and non-cognitive abilities and COVID-19 compliance behaviors using cross-country data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). We find that both cognitive and non-cognitive skills predict responsible health behaviors during the COVID-19 crisis. Episodic memory is the most important cognitive skill, while conscientiousness and neuroticism are the most significant personality traits. There is also some evidence of a role for an internal locus of control in compliance. usc Refereed/Peer-reviewed

  • Publication . Article . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Roger Frutos; Olivier Pliez; Laurent Gavotte; Christian Devaux;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 caused by SARS-CoV-2, the question of the origin of this virus has been a highly debated issue. Debates have been, and are still, very disputed and often violent between the two main hypotheses: a natural origin through the “spillover” model or a laboratory-leak origin. Tenants of these two options are building arguments often based on the discrepancies of the other theory. The main problem is that it is the initial question of the origin itself which is biased. Charles Darwin demonstrated in 1859 that all species are appearing through a process of evolution, adaptation and selection. There is no determined origin to any animal or plant species, simply an evolutionary and selective process in which chance and environment play a key role. The very same is true for viruses. There is no determined origin to viruses, simply also an evolutionary and selective process in which chance and environment play a key role. However, in the case of viruses the process is slightly more complex because the “environment” is another living organism. Pandemic viruses already circulate in humans prior to the emergence of a disease. They are simply not capable of triggering an epidemic yet. They must evolve in-host, i.e. in-humans, for that. The evolutionary process which gave rise to SARS-CoV-2 is still ongoing with regular emergence of novel variants more adapted than the previous ones. The real relevant question is how these viruses can emerge as pandemic viruses and what the society can do to prevent the future emergence of pandemic viruses.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Konstantin Mochalov; Pavel Samokhvalov; Galina Nifontova; T. Tsoi; Alyona Sukhanova; Igor Nabiev;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Abstract Fast, sensitive, high-throughput detection of coronavirus antigens at physiologically relevant levels is essential for population screening that could prevent epidemics such as the current COVID-19 global pandemic. Optical methods based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy are promising for this purpose because they ensure quick detection of even single biological molecules in a sample. For achieving such a high sensitivity, it is crucial to design SERS-active systems concentrating incident radiation into small sample volumes. Here, metal-dielectric cavities have been obtained through interaction of protein sulfhydryl groups with a SERS-active silver surface. The concentration of light in these cavities allows the differential detection of spike glycoprotein and nucleocapsid protein of SARS-COV-2, which are its key antigens, at physiologically relevant concentrations. The cavity Q-factor can be increased by additionally covering the dielectric protein film with a silver shell to form an ultrathin cavity, which provides an at least tenfold enhancement of the detection signal. The results could be used to design high-throughput systems for specific and sensitive detection of viral antigens and quick diagnosis of viral infections.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Karin E. Limburg; Françoise Daverat;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Abstract The global lockdowns brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic forced an immediate change in the way people moved about;namely, travel was slowed from a turbulent river to a trickle In-person meetings, often involving long-distance flights, were either canceled, postponed, or shifted over to virtual modes People who were unfamiliar with online meetings quickly became acquainted with them

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    A. Perciaccante; Alessia Coralli; Philippe Charlier;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; Background: In the absence of a treatment still considered universally effective, and of a vaccine validated by the health authorities, we wanted to know which Catholic saint the European Christian community turned to in the event of infection with Covid-19 to request a miraculous healing. Methodology: An online survey was carried out on a sample of 1158 adults using social media tools. Results: All results are presented in this research, with a few saints in the majority, and some dictated by the symptomatology of the Covid-19 infection or the personalities of certain « doctor guru ». Conclusion: This medico-anthropological study is revealing the psychology of Western patients vis-à-vis the magic-religious means used in the fight against diseases, particularly in the epidemic/pandemic context.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sienna R. Craig; Nawang Gurung; Ross Perlin; Maya Daurio; Daniel Kaufman; Mark Turin; Kunchog Tseten;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Abstract This article analyzes the audio diaries of a Tibetan physician, originally from Amdo (Qinghai Province, China), now living in New York City. Dr. Kunchog Tseten describes his experiences during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, in spring and summer 2020, when Queens, New York—the location where he lives and works—was the “epicenter of the epicenter” of the novel coronavirus outbreak in the United States. The collaborative research project of which this diary is a part combines innovative methodological approaches to qualitative, ethnographic study during this era of social distancing with an attunement to the relationship between language, culture, and health care. Dr. Kunchog’s diary and our analysis of its contents illustrate the ways that Tibetan medicine and Tibetan cultural practices, including those emergent from Buddhism, have helped members of the Himalayan and Tibetan communities in New York City navigate this unprecedented moment with care and compassion.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leila Chassery; Gaëtan Texier; Vincent Pommier de Santi; Hervé Chaudet; Nathalie Bonnardel; Liliane Pellegrin;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    In late 2019, an epidemic of SARS-CoV-2 broke out in central China. Within a few months, this new virus had spread right across the globe, officially being classified as a pandemic on 11 March 2020. In France, which was also being affected by the virus, the government applied specific epidemiological management strategies and introduced unprecedented public health measures. This article describes the outbreak management system that was applied within the French military and, more specifically, analyzes an outbreak of COVID-19 that occurred on board a nuclear aircraft carrier. We applied the AcciMap systemic analysis approach to understand the course of events that led to the outbreak and identify the relevant human and organizational failures. Results highlight causal factors at several levels of the outbreak management system. They reveal problems with the benchmarks used for diagnosis and decision-making, and underscore the importance of good communication between different levels. We discuss ways of improving epidemiological management in military context.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dan Laffoley; John M. Baxter; Diva J. Amon; Joachim Claudet; Jason M. Hall-Spencer; Kirsten Grorud-Colvert; Lisa A. Levin; P. Chris Reid; Alex Rogers; Michelle L. Taylor; +2 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United Kingdom, United States, France

    Author(s): Laffoley, Dan; Baxter, John M; Amon, Diva J; Claudet, Joachim; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Grorud-Colvert, Kirsten; Levin, Lisa A; Reid, P Chris; Rogers, Alex D; Taylor, Michelle L; Woodall, Lucy C; Andersen, Natalie F

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Van Thuan Hoang; Ndiaw Goumballa; Jaffar A. Al-Tawfiq; Cheick Sokhna; Philippe Gautret;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience

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