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15 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Publications
  • Research data
  • 2018-2022
  • Preprint
  • Hyper Article en Ligne
  • Mémoires en Sciences de l'Information et de la Communication
  • Hyper Article en Ligne - Sciences de l'Homme et de la Société
  • DARIAH EU

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Marie-Laure Massot; Agnès Tricoche;
    Publisher: Centre pour la Communication Scientifique Directe (CCSD)
    Country: France

    This article presents a study of the French-speaking digital humanities. It is based on the experience of two research engineers from the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) who have been studying these issues for the last ten years. They conducted a survey at the École Normale Supérieure (ENS-Paris) which enabled them to draw up an overview of the transformation of the profession of humanities and social sciences research engineers in the context of the digital humanities. The Digit_Hum initiative, which they run in parallel with their respective activities at the ENS, also provided information for this overview thanks to its role as a space for discussion about the digital humanities along with training and structuring of this field at the ENS and the Université Paris Sciences & Lettres (PSL). Cet article est une réflexion sur les humanités numériques en contexte francophone. Elle s’appuie sur l'expérience de deux ingénieures du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique travaillant sur ces questions depuis une dizaine d'années. À travers l'enquête qu'elles ont menée à l'École normale supérieure (ENS-Paris), elles dressent un panorama de la transformation du métier d'ingénieur(e) en sciences humaines et sociales dans le contexte des humanités numériques. L'initiative Digit_Hum, qu'elles animent en parallèle de leurs activités respectives à l'École, nourrit également ce témoignage en constituant un espace de discussions, de formations et de structuration des humanités numériques au sein de l'ENS et de l’Université Paris Sciences & Lettres.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Bowers, Jack; Herold, Axel; Romary, Laurent; Tasovac, Toma;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    The present paper describes the etymological component of the TEI Lex-0 initiative which aims at defining a terser subset of the TEI guidelines for the representation of etymological features in dictionary entries. Going beyond the basic provision of etymological mechanisms in the TEI guidelines, TEI Lex-0 Etym proposes a systematic representation of etymological and cognate descriptions by means of embedded constructs based on the (for etymologies) and (for etymons and cognates) elements. In particular, given that all the potential contents of etymons are highly analogous to those of dictionary entries in general, the contents presented herein heavily re-use many of the corresponding features and constraints introduced in other components of the TEI Lex-0 to the encoding of etymologies and etymons. The TEI Lex-0 Etym model is also closely aligned to ISO 24613-3 on modelling etymological data and the corresponding TEI serialisation available in ISO 24613-4.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet; Truan, Naomi;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    In this resource, you can follow a step-by-step description of a research data workflow involving the annotation of multilingual parliamentary corpora (French, German, British) according to the guidelines of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). Read further if you are interested in working with the TEI, analyzing parliamentary corpora, or simply would like to see a validated example of how FAIR and open data is implemented in the context of a PhD dissertation in Corpus Linguistics.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefan Buddenbohm; Maaike A. de Jong; Jean-Luc Minel; Yoann Moranville;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | HaS-DARIAH (675570)

    AbstractHow can researchers identify suitable research data repositories for the deposit of their research data? Which repository matches best the technical and legal requirements of a specific research project? For this end and with a humanities perspective the Data Deposit Recommendation Service (DDRS) has been developed as a prototype. It not only serves as a functional service for selecting humanities research data repositories but it is particularly a technical demonstrator illustrating the potential of re-using an already existing infrastructure - in this case re3data - and the feasibility to set up this kind of service for other research disciplines. The documentation and the code of this project can be found in the DARIAH GitHub repository: https://dariah-eric.github.io/ddrs/.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Edmond, Jennifer; Basaraba, Nicole; Doran, Michelle; Garnett, Vicky; Grile, Courtney Helen; Papaki, Eliza; Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
  • Publication . Preprint . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Article . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rehm, Georg; Marheinecke, Katrin; Hegele, Stefanie; Piperidis, Stelios; Bontcheva, Kalina; Hajic, Jan; Choukri, Khalid; Vasiljevs, Andrejs; Backfried, Gerhard; Prinz, Christoph; +37 more
    Countries: France, Denmark, France
    Project: SFI | ADAPT: Centre for Digital... (13/RC/2106), EC | BDVe (732630), EC | ELG (825627), EC | AI4EU (825619), FCT | PINFRA/22117/2016 (PINFRA/22117/2016), EC | X5gon (761758), SFI | ADAPT: Centre for Digital... (13/RC/2106), EC | BDVe (732630), EC | ELG (825627), EC | AI4EU (825619),...

    Multilingualism is a cultural cornerstone of Europe and firmly anchored in the European treaties including full language equality. However, language barriers impacting business, cross-lingual and cross-cultural communication are still omnipresent. Language Technologies (LTs) are a powerful means to break down these barriers. While the last decade has seen various initiatives that created a multitude of approaches and technologies tailored to Europe's specific needs, there is still an immense level of fragmentation. At the same time, AI has become an increasingly important concept in the European Information and Communication Technology area. For a few years now, AI, including many opportunities, synergies but also misconceptions, has been overshadowing every other topic. We present an overview of the European LT landscape, describing funding programmes, activities, actions and challenges in the different countries with regard to LT, including the current state of play in industry and the LT market. We present a brief overview of the main LT-related activities on the EU level in the last ten years and develop strategic guidance with regard to four key dimensions. Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference (LREC 2020). To appear

  • English
    Authors: 
    Wissik, Tanja; Edmond, Jennifer; Fischer, Frank; de Jong, Franciska; Scagliola, Stefania; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Schmeer, Hendrik; Scholger, Walter; Wessels, Leon;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | CLARIN-PLUS (676529)

    The digital humanities (DH) enrich the traditional fields of the humanities with new practices, approaches and methods. Since the turn of the millennium, the necessary skills to realise these new possibilities have been taught in summer schools, workshops and other alternative formats. In the meantime, a growing number of Bachelor's and Master's programmes in digital humanities have been launched worldwide. The DH Course Registry, which is the focus of this article, was created to provide an overview of the growing range of courses on offer worldwide. Its mission is to gather the rich offerings of different courses and to provide an up-to-date picture of the teaching and training opportunities in the field of DH. The article provides a general introduction to this emerging area of research and introduces the two European infrastructures CLARIN and DARIAH, which jointly operate the DH Course Registry. A short history of the Registry is accompanied by a description of the data model and the data curation workflow. Current data, available through the API of the Registry, is evaluated to quantitatively map the international landscape of DH teaching.Preprint of a publication for LibraryTribune (China) (accepted)

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet; Romary, Laurent;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    There is a growing need to establish domain-or discipline-specific approaches to research data sharing workflows. A defining feature of data and data workflows in the arts and humanities domain is their dependence on cultural heritage sources hosted and curated in museums, libraries, galleries and archives. A major difficulty when scholars interact with heritage data is that the nature of the cooperation between researchers and Cultural Heritage Institutions (henceforth CHIs) is often constrained by structural and legal challenges but even more by uncertainties as to the expectations of both parties. The Heritage Data Reuse Charter aims to address these by designing a common environment that will enable all the relevant actors to work together to connect and improve access to heritage data and make transactions related to the scholarly use of cultural heritage data more visible and transparent. As a first step, a wide range of stakeholders on the Cultural Heritage and research sector agreed upon a set of generic principles, summarized in the Mission Statement of the Charter, that can serve as a baseline governing the interactions between CHIs, researchers and data centres. This was followed by a long and thorough validation process related to these principles through surveys 1 and workshops 2. As a second step, we now put forward a questionnaire template tool that helps researchers and CHIs to translate the 6 core principles into specific research project settings. It contains questions about access to data, provenance information, preferred citation standards, hosting responsibilities etc. on the basis of which the parties can arrive at mutual reuse agreements that could serve as a starting point for a FAIR-by-construction data management, right from the project planning/application phase. The questionnaire template and the resulting mutual agreements can be flexibly applied to projects of different scale and in platform-independent ways. Institutions can embed them into their own exchange protocols while researchers can add them to their Data Management Plans. As such, they can show evidence for responsible and fair conduct of cultural heritage data, and fair (but also FAIR) research data management practices that are based on partnership with the holding institution.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Baillot, Anne; Giovacchini, Julie;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Submission for Journal of the Text Encoding Initiative - Issue 14; The TEI Guidelines are developed and curated by a community whose main purpose is to standardize the encoding of primary sources relevant for Humanities research and teaching. But there are other communities working with TEI-based publication formats. The first goal of this paper is to raise awareness for the importance of TEI-based scholarly publishing as we know it today. The second goal is to contribute to a reflection on the development of a TEI customization that would cover the whole authoring-reviewing-publishing workflow and guarantee archiving options as solid for journal publications as we now have them for primary sources published in TEI.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tóth-Czifra, Erzsébet;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    In recent years, FAIR principles have come a long way to serve the global need for generic guidelines governing data management and stewardship. Considering their wide embrace and the support received from governments, policy-makers, governing bodies and funding bodies, FAIR principles have all the potential to have a huge impact on the future landscape of knowledge creation for the better. This opportunity, however, may easily be missed if the specific dynamics of scientific production are not addressed in its disciplinary implementation plans. With the goal of making FAIR meaningful and helping to realise its promises in an arts and humanities context, this paper describes some of the defining aspects underlying the domain-specific epistemic processes that pose hidden or visible challenges in the FAIRification of knowledge creation in Arts and Humanities. By applying the FAIR data guiding principles to arts and humanities data curation workflows, we will show that contrary to their general scope and deliberately domain-independent nature, they have been implicitly designed along underlying assumptions about how knowledge creation operates and communicates. These are: 1. scholarly data or metadata is digital by nature, 2. scholarly data is always created and therefore owned by researchers, and 3. there is a wide community-level agreement on what can be considered scholarly data. The problems around such assumptions in arts and humanities are cornerstones in reconciling disciplinary traditions with the productive implementation of FAIR data management. By addressing them one by one, we aim to contribute to the better understanding of discipline-specific needs and challenges in data production, discovery and reuse. Based on these considerations, we make recommendations that may facilitate the inclusive and optimal implementation of the high-level principles that serve the flourishing of the arts and humanities disciplines rather than imposing limitations on its epistemic practices.

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