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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marien González-Hidalgo; Diego Cidrás;
    Country: Sweden

    Social and cultural perspectives are increasingly considered in the literature on invasive alien species (IAS), after decades of being underexplored. However, within this growing body of research, there is little investigation into the role and knowledge of everyday rural and environmentalist networks in defining and engaging with or against the expansion of IAS. This paper contributes to debates on the political and spatial implications of this concept, through a critical examination of the bottom-up initiative of the 'De-eucalyptising Brigades' (Galicia, Spain), which aims to remove eucalyptus trees from community-based property lands. A survey of participants of this movement paired with semi-structured interviews show the relevance of social-cultural dynamics in defining IAS. Our results also show how investigating activism against forestry involving a potential IAS sheds light on the everyday conflicts around who defines IAS and how they are defined.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anna-Karin L. Larsson;
    Publisher: Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract The present study explores medical views on sexual health, gender and youth in Sweden from 1970 to 1999. In terms of gender-based roles, the responsibility for sexual health at this time turned out to be closely linked to girls. First, there was a clear perception that girls should take responsibility for their own and the couple’s sexual health, manifested in counselling, contraception and the understanding of risk-taking. Secondly, there was an underlying notion that boys had greater sexual needs than girls. Boys were seen as irresponsible and uninterested in counselling and decisions on contraception. Medical experts hardly mentioned joint responsibility for sexual health and contraception before the 1990s. In addition, there was a widespread perception that it was the risk-taking of some girls that increased exposure to sexual ill-health. They presented girls who did not adhere to the female responsibility norm as problematic. The study also showed a solid heteronormative view of young people’s sexual health.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lerg, Charlotte A.; Östling, Johan; Weiß, Jana;
    Publisher: De Gruyter
    Country: Sweden

    With concepts of participation discussed in multiple disciplines from media studies to anthropology, from political sciences to sociology, the first issue of the new yearbook History of Intellectual Culture (HIC) dedicates a thematic section to the way knowledge can and arguably must be conceptualized as "participatory".Introducing and exploring "participatory knowledge", the volume aims to draw attention to the potential of looking at knowledge formation and circulation through a new lens and to open a dialogue about how and what concepts and theories of participation can contribute to the history of knowledge. By asking who gets to participate in defining what counts as knowledge and in deciding whose knowledge is circulated, modes of participation enter into the examination of knowledge on various levels and within multiple cultural contexts.The articles in this volume attest to the great variety of approaches, contexts, and interpretations of "participatory knowledge", from the sociological projects of the Frankfurt School to the Uppsala-based Institute for Race Biology, from the Argentinian National Folklore Survey to current hashtag activism and Covid-19-archive projects. HIC sees knowledge as rooted in social and political structures, determined by modes of transfer and produced in collaborative processes. The notion of "participatory knowledge" highlights in a compelling way how knowledge is rooted in cultural practices and social configurations.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elin Manker;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper
    Country: Sweden

    Illustrated price catalogues were published and distributed during the second half of the nineteenth century in every country that was affected by industrialization. The illustrations that were used in these catalogues intermingled with several contemporary image-systems; the centuries old practice of engraving, the relatively new practise of using photography, the illustrated publication, displays at world exhibitions and educational displays in public museums. The aim of this article is to investigate the circulation of knowledge that the photographs in the illustrated price catalogues took part in and to interrogate them as object photography. My journey includes three steps: early photography from the 1840s, the illustrated price catalogues of the 1880s, and contemporary antiques journals. This article discusses what knowledge was/is produced, maintained, transformed, and transferred by the use of object photography in these contexts. To this purpose, object photography is identified as a genre of images that generates knowledge that negotiates questions of time and historicity. I note that this is a quality that made object photography pertinent for nineteenth-century manufacturing and marketing and continues to be relevant for the historic revivalism and antiques business today.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Charlotte A. Lerg; Johan Östling; Jana Weiß;
    Publisher: De Gruyter
    Country: Sweden
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Charlotte A. Lerg; Johan Ö Östling; Jana Weiß;
    Publisher: De Gruyter
    Country: Sweden
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thomas Pettersson; Johan Jansson; Urban Lindgren;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Enheten för ekonomisk historia
    Country: Sweden

    We explore the decisions in Parliament about the Swedish tax deduction for commuting since the 1980s. The aim is to explain the continuity of the tax regulation despite several attempts from motions in Parliament and public investigations to reform it towards environmental goals, e.g., reduced emissions of CO2. When reforms have been proposed, the political majority in Parliament has regardless of political colour voted against and retreated to the original motives for the tax deduction; economic growth and the enlargement of regional labour markets. The interests of Swedish mass motorisation succeeded in finding the arguments to slow down reforms and at the same time reinforce the path dependency by adding new legitimacy to the regulation. If the attempts to reform the tax deduction had been part of a broader reform of the transport sector and the tax system, they might have succeeded in breaking with the old path.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Johan Jarlbrink; Fredrik Norén;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Sweden

    Based on digital readings of all records from the Swedish parliament1867–2019, we examine how the concept ‘propaganda’ was used in the debates. To track the concept, we have extracted word window co-occurrences, bigrams, and keywords. Research on the history of propaganda in liberal democracies has emphasized that the meaning of the concept was open-ended before WWI. By 1945, it had been contaminated by authoritarian propaganda, and its negative connotations were cemented at least by the 1960s. Our analysis, however, shows that ‘propaganda’ was used mainly in a negative sense from 1867 to 2019. Nevertheless, it was also possible to use ‘propaganda’ in a positive and neutral sense between the 1910s and 1980s. We suggest that a period of deideologization in Sweden post-WWII made it possible to use ‘propaganda’ as long as the issues were seen as non-controversial. The radicalization in the late-1960s meant that authorities and previously non-controversial issues became contested. To suggest one-directional ‘propaganda’ in order to implement what politicians had decided was in people’s best interest became difficult int his context. In this new communication setting, ‘information’ was a more flexible term in contexts where ‘propaganda’ had previously been used in a neutral or positive sense.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ögren, Anders; Trautwein, Hans-Michael;
    Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract The functioning of multi-nation monetary unions with several central banks is conditioned by many factors and considerations, such as the capacity to deal with crises, the political will and operational skill to foster financial integration and to develop a mix of rules and discretion in the cooperation between the central banks. The Scandinavian monetary union (SMU) between 1873 and 1931 is a case in point for illustrating the importance of these factors and considerations. We examine the policies implemented in the Scandinavian countries to deal with asymmetries of payments flows and with financial crises at three levels: in an account of major crises that required lending of last resort, in a study of the clearing and settlement mechanism established in the union, and in a survey of contemporary economists’ views on lending of last resort and cooperation in the SMU.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudia Merli;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för kulturantropologi och etnologi
    Country: Sweden

    The years 2020-2022 engraved our existence with epidemiological and political monstrosities that will not be forgotten for quite some time. The COVID-19 pandemic dragged us to contemplating the possibilities of a plague that, rather than being confined to the global south’s ‘invisible’ territories of diseases, heavily affected the global north and with the prospect of wiping out a large number of the world’s population in a similar manner to that of the 1918 influenza epidemic. Governments were caught between choices to either privilege lives or economies and eugenics reared its head as a spectre from the historical past. A benign marine monster, the Amabie, a prophetic yōkai from Japanese folklore, became popular, initially in Japan and, rather rapidly on a global scale, assumed a prominent position, becoming an icon for the COVID-19 pandemic. I interrogate how people resorted to this chimeric creature from marine and historical depths to deal with existential uncertainty and abnormal lives, rendering it a chronotope that connects times and spaces. Such aquapelagic creatures frame the ambiguity of a world where political, environmental and health disasters merge.

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