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276 Research products, page 1 of 28

  • Publications
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  • 2021-2021
  • Open Access
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  • VIUSpace

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  • Publication . Research . 2021 . Embargo End Date: 15 Dec 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reed, Kathleen; Travers; Marchbank, Jennifer;
    Publisher: My University
    Country: Canada

    Historically, youth (13-25) have been one of the most active user groups of public transit in Canada, accounting for one-third of ridership nation-wide, and up to two-thirds in cities such as Moose Jaw, SK and Red Deer, AB (Canadian Urban Transit Association, 2004). Despite their high usage of public transportation, youth as a specific category of riders have received an underwhelming amount of focus by academics and transit authorities. This report synthesizes the last ten years of evidence, policy, and pilot projects related to youth as a public transportation user group in order to provide an up-to-date summary of the state of knowledge in this area. Youth and public transportation research is identified and evaluated, including data sources and gaps. Media coverage of the issue is also considered, as many of the concerns of youth, public debates, and pilot programs related to youth and public transit are only referenced in this format. The final section of this work consists of an evidence-based agenda for future research and policy, with an eye toward enhancing the equity of access to transit systems for youth riders. SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis Grants – Mobility and Public Transit (2020), Grant #872-2020-1005

  • Publication . Research . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reed, Kathleen; Marchbank, Jennifer; Travers;
    Country: Canada

    This two page evidence brief summarizes recent (2010-2021) literature related to youth and public transit. Major themes include demand, barriers, youth advocacy, various types of passes (i.e., U-PASS, free or reduced-fares), and active transportation. A list of recommendations for transit planners and policy-makers is included. SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis Grant – Mobility and Public Transit (2020), Grant #872-2020-1005

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reed, Kathleen; Marchbank, Jennifer; Travers;
    Country: Canada

    This two page evidence brief summarizes the academic literature and media reports of free and fare-reduced public transit for youth. Motivations, Canadian initiatives, and assessment of programs are considered. SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis Grant – Mobility and Public Transit (2020), Grant #872-2020-1005

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Niroo, Farnoosh; Van Winkle, Christine;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In recent years, novel and innovative ways to accommodate diners and visitors’ desire for new experiences have emerged (Warnaby & Shi, 2018). Pop-up restaurants are indicative of this growing trend to provide an appealing combination of experiences and food. Considering the temporary nature of pop-up restaurants, it is important to understand diners’ perceptions regarding the multiple dimensions of the pop-up dining experience compared to traditional dining-in restaurants. By taking a qualitative approach, this study explored diners’ perspectives of their experiences at pop-up restaurants. Semi-structured interviews were used to get a deep understanding of diners’ perceptions about various aspects of their pop-up dining experiences. An interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006) was conducted to answer two main research questions: 1) Is pop-up dining a memorable and meaningful experience compared to a traditional dining experience? 2) What are the qualities that create a memorable and meaningful pop-up restaurant experience? The findings demonstrate that the qualities which create a meaningful pop-up dining experience relate not only to the values offered by pop-up restaurants, but also to the personal values of the diners themselves. The connection between the value offered by the restaurant and the value perceived by diners is co-created and results in achieving experiential benefits for the diners. A model was proposed, based on the Service-Dominant Logic framework (Vargo & Lusch, 2008), to represent the co-creation of the experience at pop-up restaurants. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25241/Niroo&VanWinkle.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alford, Stewart; Perlman, Dana; Sumskis, Susan; Moxham, Lorna; Patterson, Christopher;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    This chapter discusses the leisure-based innovation, known as Recovery Camp (RC), from the perspective of the developing evidence base on RC’s role in offering leisure-based challenge, support, and facilitation of participant's self-determination and personal resilience within mental health recovery. The value of this case study for academic audiences is the comprehensive review of the research findings of RC as a leisure intervention and discussion of the application of the theoretical constructs of self-determination theory and resilience within leisure-based RC practice. The value of the case study for non-academic audiences is gaining a thorough understanding of leisure in the context of RC for the purposes of facilitating individual's mental health recovery and understanding how purposefully-designed outdoor leisure activities can have life-changing benefits for participants. In essence, RC adds new evidence to the existing evidence base of therapeutic recreation and enriches the perception that leisure is more than just a ‘good time’, through demonstrating that leisure can be used as a therapeutic modality to educate, facilitate self-determination, unlock intrinsic resilience, and improve the mental health of participants. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25232/AlfordEtAl.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Broderick, Lliam Anthony;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    This case study will critically examine lessons learned during COVID-19 to inform how we advance change towards socially sustainable public spaces. Through the lens of equity, access to public space for vulnerable populations during COVID-19 in Victoria, British Columbia, is explored. A stakeholder analysis is presented to illuminate the nature of stakeholder engagement within the City of Victoria, followed by a review of the intersectoral response that led to the activation of ERCs and the mobilization of hotel rooms to accommodate people experiencing homelessness during the pandemic. Furthermore, this case study will discuss how participatory processes, such as equity-centred design, placemaking, and equity mapping, can facilitate community and citizen engagement. This case highlights the emergence of leisure-related innovations as catalysts for social change—an increasingly important area of leisure research. In addition, this case study outlines the urgent need for research related to the intersection of COVID-19, equity, public space, and leisure. For broader audiences, such as local governments, not-for profit organizations, and leisure service providers, the value of this case study is underscored by the relevance of co-creation in the context of inclusive land-use planning, policy, and design. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25231/Broderick.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alexander, Don;
    Publisher: Planning Institute of British Columbia
    Country: Canada

    Book review Copyright (2021) Planning Institute of British Columbia. The following article originally appeared as: Alexander, D. (2021). [Review of The good ancestor: A radical prescription for long-term thinking by R. Krznaric]. Planning West, 63(4), 30. Planning West is published by the Planning Institute of British Columbia. The PIBC website can be found at: https://www.pibc.bc.ca/ Review of The good ancestor: A radical prescription for long-term thinking by Roman Krznaric. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25227/Alexander.PW.Fall2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Schmid, Jeanette; Bradley, Holly;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    This research has aimed to identify the ways in which social service delivery in the mid-Island region of Vancouver Island has shifted because of COVID-19 conditions. Prompted by initial informal comments regarding the effect of the pandemic, we initiated an 18-month research process that checked in with representatives of social service agencies at six-month intervals. The study offers a local perspective that may have insights and lessons relevant to social service organizations elsewhere. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25255/SchmidBradley2021.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wu, Lihui;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    This case study demonstrates how an obsolete military factory complex, which manufactured weapon components in the industrialization period, was developed into a center of contemporary art as an example of urban renewal (Dekker, 2011). Using an adaptive reuse strategy, what is now known as the 798 Arts District survived a demolition crisis and achieved economic and cultural sustainability by transforming into a cultural epicenter (Dekker, 2011). After much negotiation between the government and the cultural industry, the district has turned into a flourishing mixed-use community that benefits the landowner, artists, neighboring residents, and tourists. The success of the 798 Arts District stems from the grassroots movement initiated by the artists and non-profit institutes. They challenged the authorities, who intended to carry out the demolition of the 798 Arts District, to preserve the cultural heritage of that area and shift power to the people. The adaptive reuse strategy also played a critical role in the process; the aim of this strategy is to retain the aesthetics of the original venues and preserve their cultural, architectural and historical values (Sasaki, 2020). Ultimately, the 798 Arts District gave voice to the cultural and creative industry and proved the economic and social viability of the cultural economy (Currier, 2008). The 798 Arts District can serve as a model of sustainability for other arts districts or redevelopment projects in urban areas. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25238/Wu.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Seiferth, Carolin;
    Publisher: VIU Publications
    Country: Canada

    By introducing Cayuga Collection as one of the world leaders in sustainable travel, my case study explores principles for building organizational resilience. I will illustrate effective and innovative solutions regarding crisis management strategies through the lens of the Panarchy Adaptive Cycle Model. To explore the potential of companies with a high level of resilience and flexible business operations to recover faster from crisis, I am going to outline management actions all while discussing their potential to constitute competitive advantages. Through interviews, my own insights into Cayuga’s company culture, and personal communication over a period of six months, I will describe how tourism companies’ continuous commitment to their sustainability strategy can set them apart from their competitors. Further, I will situate my findings within a broader industry context. Based on my research, I argue that companies such as Cayuga that conduct business operations all while considering the triple bottom line, imply principles for building resilience, and embrace flexible but effective crisis management are the ones that navigate the transition of an entire industry towards sustainable consumption. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25262/Seiferth.pdf?sequence=3

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