Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
146 Research products, page 1 of 15

  • Publications
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • English
  • University of Southern Denmark Research Output
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

10
arrow_drop_down
Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Haastrup, Mette Fentz; Bjerre, Cecilie;
    Country: Denmark

    The Collaborative History Project (CHP) is a citizen science project named ”Vores Historie” (“Our History”). The topic was family revolution, a period from 1960 to 1980s. The goals are:Scientific: Writing more multifarious and inclusive histories that include citizens’ lived experiencesEducational: Developping connections between students’ everyday lives and science, improving students’ scientific literacy with respect to qualitative data, and improving the intergenerational dialogue in society (high school students and senior citizens).

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Therkel Stræde;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kaare Lund Rasmussen; Johannes van der Plicht; Ilaria Degano; Francesca Modugno; Maria Perla Colombini; Guillermo de la Fuente; Thomas Delbey; Amos Frumkin; Uri Davidovich; Roi Porat; +5 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Denmark, Netherlands

    AbstractThe present study reports a series of interdisciplinary archaeometrical analyses of objects found in the Christmas Cave, which was discovered by John Allegro and his team in 1960 on the West Bank of the Dead Sea and assumed to be inhabited only in the Chalcolithic era and by Jewish refugees of the second century CE, at the end of the Bar Kokhba Revolt. Like many other Judaean desert caves, there was an abundance of organic material, especially textiles, surviving in the dry environment. In the absence of clear stratigraphy and even a proper publication of the finds, the present study shows how archaeometry can provide important insights. We analysed food crusts on ceramics by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC–MS), made petrographic descriptions to estimated provenance of the ceramics, produced new radiocarbon dates from organic material and thermoluminescence (TL) dates from the pottery. It appears from the data that the Christmas Cave has been briefly inhabited or visited intermittently over a very long time, starting ca. 4000 BCE (the Chalcolithic period), and extending all the way to the Medieval period, even though there is also a concentration of dates near the period of the Bar Kokhba Revolt (132–136 CE). We argue, through a detailed analysis of the radiometric and TL-datings and by the artefactual evidence, that there was likely another refuge episode connected with the First Jewish Revolt during which people fled to this cave. However, we see no material connection to Qumran and nearby caves. Overall, our study demonstrates the importance of archaeometric studies in cave environments where stratigraphy is veritably absent.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jensen, Mogens Kragsig; Holck, Jakob Povl; Vlachos, Evgenios;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Jänicke, Stefan;
    Publisher: Springer Science+Business Media
    Country: Denmark

    The use of visualization to underpin distant reading arguments on cultural heritage data has established in the digital humanities domain. Novel strategies to represent data visually typically arise from interdisciplinary projects involving humanities and visualization scholars. However, the quality of outcomes might be inhibited as typical challenges of interdisciplinary research arise, and, at the same time, problem solving strategies are missing. I taught a course on visual data analysis in the digital humanities to let students with diverse study backgrounds experience those challenges in their early academic careers. This paper illustrates the research-teaching components of my course. This includes the contents of the theoretical training with active learning tasks, aspects of the practical training and considerations for teachers aiming to compose a related course.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Khulusi, Richard; Focht, Josef; Jänicke, Stefan;
    Publisher: Springer Science+Business Media
    Country: Denmark

    While digitizing data is the first major step for many digital humanities projects, the visual analysis is of high value for humanists, as it brings a wide range of possibilities to work with data. While rather traditional analysis often concentrates on standalone or sets of information (close reading), global inspections of linked data are also requested by today’s researchers and made possible through digital processing. Hence, distance reading approaches are more and more found in humanities projects. Next to such approaches allowing new research questions of quantitative analysis, linking previously separate information on a data level is another way of providing humanists with access to further, previously not reachable, global inspections of faceted datasets. As a domain with both, faceted data and a rather low level of digitization, musicology is a prime example of how the digital humanities may improve and support the daily workflows of humanists. Despite the generally low level of digitization, multiple projects already build a basis to help in digitizing the field. As an example, the musiXplora project collected a vast amount of musicological data throughout the last 16 years and now offers both, a detailed biography of persons, places, objects, events, media, institutions and terms and also the linkage between these kinds of entities to help in giving a user a comprehensible overview in the traditionally fragmented field of musicology. Supported by a set of visualizations, the website of the project allows for visual analysis on close reading and distant reading levels. This does not only help researchers in their daily workflows but also offers users with a more casual nature an interesting view inside the domain of musicology.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Olav Hammer; Karen Swartz;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Denmark

    The years 2020 and 2021 will be remembered as a time profoundly marked by the COVID-19 pandemic. We have all had to come to grips with the effects of this invisible global menace, which has left any number of visible traces behind in its wake, not only individually but also as members of the communities, whatever contours and foundations they may have, to which we belong. Religious communities in particular have attempted to adapt to, or in some cases resist, the strictures imposed by various forms of lockdown which have lasted for varying stretches of time, have created rituals intended to address the needs and concerns of their members, and have formulated explanations for the emergence of the pandemic in terms of their doctrinal systems. The first five articles in this issue of Approaching Religion explore such community-based ways of interpreting and dealing with the impact of the COVID-19 crisis.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dietrich Jung;
    Publisher: MDPI AG
    Country: Denmark

    How to be authentically modern? This was the pervasive question behind the ideological elaborations of numerous religious and nationalist movements toward the end of the nineteenth century. Many of them attempted to find the answer in an imaginary past. This article claims that Islamist movements are not an exception, but rather an affirmation of this rule. The orientation towards a “golden age” of Islam and its allegedly authentic Islamic way of life has been a crucial feature of Islamist thought across all national, sectarian and ideological divides. The article traces this invocation of the past historically back to the construction of specifically Islamic forms of modernity by representatives of Islamic modernism in the second half of the nineteenth century. Interpreting their modernist thought in the context of more global nineteenth-century concepts and narratives, the article argues from a comparative perspective that Islamic modernism laid the foundations for the ways in which Islamist thinkers have constructed both individual and collective forms of Muslim identities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tom F. A. Watts; Rubrick Biegon;
    Countries: Denmark, United Kingdom

    This paper aims to develop the study of remote warfare’s constitutive “remoteness.” It proposes a novel definition of remoteness as the degree of the American public’s socio-psychological detachment from the realities of political violence fought at a physical distance from the continental United States, as mediated through spectatorship of the use of military force. The remoteness of remote warfare has physical, psychological, and social properties. We argue that it exists on a continuum subject to change over time and should not be approached as a fixed condition measured solely by the physical distance separating combatants involved in armed fighting or as the use of various weapons technologies. The numerous dynamics associated with the remoteness of remote warfare are illustrated through an examination of American military intervention in Libya during Obama’s presidency. From the height of the 2011 NATO intervention in the country onwards, US military operations in Libya became more “remote” for the American public. Whilst other contextual factors contributed toward this outcome, we argue that the diminished spectacle surrounding the 2016 Operation Odyssey Lightning helps explain the American public’s increasing remoteness from military intervention in Libya.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Peter L. Elkin; Sarah Mullin; Jack Mardekian; Christopher Crowner; Sylvester Sakilay; Shyamashree Sinha; Gary Brady; Marcia Wright; Kimberly Nolen; JoAnn B Trainer; +6 more
    Publisher: JMIR Publications
    Country: Denmark

    Background Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) affects almost 6 million Americans and is a major contributor to stroke but is significantly undiagnosed and undertreated despite explicit guidelines for oral anticoagulation. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate whether the use of semisupervised natural language processing (NLP) of electronic health record’s (EHR) free-text information combined with structured EHR data improves NVAF discovery and treatment and perhaps offers a method to prevent thousands of deaths and save billions of dollars. Methods We abstracted 96,681 participants from the University of Buffalo faculty practice’s EHR. NLP was used to index the notes and compare the ability to identify NVAF, congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke or transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65 to 74 years, sex category (CHA2DS2-VASc), and Hypertension, Abnormal liver/renal function, Stroke history, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drug/alcohol usage (HAS-BLED) scores using unstructured data (International Classification of Diseases codes) versus structured and unstructured data from clinical notes. In addition, we analyzed data from 63,296,120 participants in the Optum and Truven databases to determine the NVAF frequency, rates of CHA2DS2‑VASc ≥2, and no contraindications to oral anticoagulants, rates of stroke and death in the untreated population, and first year’s costs after stroke. Results The structured-plus-unstructured method would have identified 3,976,056 additional true NVAF cases (P<.001) and improved sensitivity for CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores compared with the structured data alone (P=.002 and P<.001, respectively), causing a 32.1% improvement. For the United States, this method would prevent an estimated 176,537 strokes, save 10,575 lives, and save >US $13.5 billion. Conclusions Artificial intelligence–informed bio-surveillance combining NLP of free-text information with structured EHR data improves data completeness, prevents thousands of strokes, and saves lives and funds. This method is applicable to many disorders with profound public health consequences.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
146 Research products, page 1 of 15
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Haastrup, Mette Fentz; Bjerre, Cecilie;
    Country: Denmark

    The Collaborative History Project (CHP) is a citizen science project named ”Vores Historie” (“Our History”). The topic was family revolution, a period from 1960 to 1980s. The goals are:Scientific: Writing more multifarious and inclusive histories that include citizens’ lived experiencesEducational: Developping connections between students’ everyday lives and science, improving students’ scientific literacy with respect to qualitative data, and improving the intergenerational dialogue in society (high school students and senior citizens).

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Therkel Stræde;
    Country: Denmark
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kaare Lund Rasmussen; Johannes van der Plicht; Ilaria Degano; Francesca Modugno; Maria Perla Colombini; Guillermo de la Fuente; Thomas Delbey; Amos Frumkin; Uri Davidovich; Roi Porat; +5 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Denmark, Netherlands

    AbstractThe present study reports a series of interdisciplinary archaeometrical analyses of objects found in the Christmas Cave, which was discovered by John Allegro and his team in 1960 on the West Bank of the Dead Sea and assumed to be inhabited only in the Chalcolithic era and by Jewish refugees of the second century CE, at the end of the Bar Kokhba Revolt. Like many other Judaean desert caves, there was an abundance of organic material, especially textiles, surviving in the dry environment. In the absence of clear stratigraphy and even a proper publication of the finds, the present study shows how archaeometry can provide important insights. We analysed food crusts on ceramics by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC–MS), made petrographic descriptions to estimated provenance of the ceramics, produced new radiocarbon dates from organic material and thermoluminescence (TL) dates from the pottery. It appears from the data that the Christmas Cave has been briefly inhabited or visited intermittently over a very long time, starting ca. 4000 BCE (the Chalcolithic period), and extending all the way to the Medieval period, even though there is also a concentration of dates near the period of the Bar Kokhba Revolt (132–136 CE). We argue, through a detailed analysis of the radiometric and TL-datings and by the artefactual evidence, that there was likely another refuge episode connected with the First Jewish Revolt during which people fled to this cave. However, we see no material connection to Qumran and nearby caves. Overall, our study demonstrates the importance of archaeometric studies in cave environments where stratigraphy is veritably absent.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jensen, Mogens Kragsig; Holck, Jakob Povl; Vlachos, Evgenios;
    Country: Denmark
  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Jänicke, Stefan;
    Publisher: Springer Science+Business Media
    Country: Denmark

    The use of visualization to underpin distant reading arguments on cultural heritage data has established in the digital humanities domain. Novel strategies to represent data visually typically arise from interdisciplinary projects involving humanities and visualization scholars. However, the quality of outcomes might be inhibited as typical challenges of interdisciplinary research arise, and, at the same time, problem solving strategies are missing. I taught a course on visual data analysis in the digital humanities to let students with diverse study backgrounds experience those challenges in their early academic careers. This paper illustrates the research-teaching components of my course. This includes the contents of the theoretical training with active learning tasks, aspects of the practical training and considerations for teachers aiming to compose a related course.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Khulusi, Richard; Focht, Josef; Jänicke, Stefan;
    Publisher: Springer Science+Business Media
    Country: Denmark

    While digitizing data is the first major step for many digital humanities projects, the visual analysis is of high value for humanists, as it brings a wide range of possibilities to work with data. While rather traditional analysis often concentrates on standalone or sets of information (close reading), global inspections of linked data are also requested by today’s researchers and made possible through digital processing. Hence, distance reading approaches are more and more found in humanities projects. Next to such approaches allowing new research questions of quantitative analysis, linking previously separate information on a data level is another way of providing humanists with access to further, previously not reachable, global inspections of faceted datasets. As a domain with both, faceted data and a rather low level of digitization, musicology is a prime example of how the digital humanities may improve and support the daily workflows of humanists. Despite the generally low level of digitization, multiple projects already build a basis to help in digitizing the field. As an example, the musiXplora project collected a vast amount of musicological data throughout the last 16 years and now offers both, a detailed biography of persons, places, objects, events, media, institutions and terms and also the linkage between these kinds of entities to help in giving a user a comprehensible overview in the traditionally fragmented field of musicology. Supported by a set of visualizations, the website of the project allows for visual analysis on close reading and distant reading levels. This does not only help researchers in their daily workflows but also offers users with a more casual nature an interesting view inside the domain of musicology.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Olav Hammer; Karen Swartz;
    Publisher: Donner Institute
    Country: Denmark

    The years 2020 and 2021 will be remembered as a time profoundly marked by the COVID-19 pandemic. We have all had to come to grips with the effects of this invisible global menace, which has left any number of visible traces behind in its wake, not only individually but also as members of the communities, whatever contours and foundations they may have, to which we belong. Religious communities in particular have attempted to adapt to, or in some cases resist, the strictures imposed by various forms of lockdown which have lasted for varying stretches of time, have created rituals intended to address the needs and concerns of their members, and have formulated explanations for the emergence of the pandemic in terms of their doctrinal systems. The first five articles in this issue of Approaching Religion explore such community-based ways of interpreting and dealing with the impact of the COVID-19 crisis.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dietrich Jung;
    Publisher: MDPI AG
    Country: Denmark

    How to be authentically modern? This was the pervasive question behind the ideological elaborations of numerous religious and nationalist movements toward the end of the nineteenth century. Many of them attempted to find the answer in an imaginary past. This article claims that Islamist movements are not an exception, but rather an affirmation of this rule. The orientation towards a “golden age” of Islam and its allegedly authentic Islamic way of life has been a crucial feature of Islamist thought across all national, sectarian and ideological divides. The article traces this invocation of the past historically back to the construction of specifically Islamic forms of modernity by representatives of Islamic modernism in the second half of the nineteenth century. Interpreting their modernist thought in the context of more global nineteenth-century concepts and narratives, the article argues from a comparative perspective that Islamic modernism laid the foundations for the ways in which Islamist thinkers have constructed both individual and collective forms of Muslim identities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tom F. A. Watts; Rubrick Biegon;
    Countries: Denmark, United Kingdom

    This paper aims to develop the study of remote warfare’s constitutive “remoteness.” It proposes a novel definition of remoteness as the degree of the American public’s socio-psychological detachment from the realities of political violence fought at a physical distance from the continental United States, as mediated through spectatorship of the use of military force. The remoteness of remote warfare has physical, psychological, and social properties. We argue that it exists on a continuum subject to change over time and should not be approached as a fixed condition measured solely by the physical distance separating combatants involved in armed fighting or as the use of various weapons technologies. The numerous dynamics associated with the remoteness of remote warfare are illustrated through an examination of American military intervention in Libya during Obama’s presidency. From the height of the 2011 NATO intervention in the country onwards, US military operations in Libya became more “remote” for the American public. Whilst other contextual factors contributed toward this outcome, we argue that the diminished spectacle surrounding the 2016 Operation Odyssey Lightning helps explain the American public’s increasing remoteness from military intervention in Libya.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Peter L. Elkin; Sarah Mullin; Jack Mardekian; Christopher Crowner; Sylvester Sakilay; Shyamashree Sinha; Gary Brady; Marcia Wright; Kimberly Nolen; JoAnn B Trainer; +6 more
    Publisher: JMIR Publications
    Country: Denmark

    Background Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) affects almost 6 million Americans and is a major contributor to stroke but is significantly undiagnosed and undertreated despite explicit guidelines for oral anticoagulation. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate whether the use of semisupervised natural language processing (NLP) of electronic health record’s (EHR) free-text information combined with structured EHR data improves NVAF discovery and treatment and perhaps offers a method to prevent thousands of deaths and save billions of dollars. Methods We abstracted 96,681 participants from the University of Buffalo faculty practice’s EHR. NLP was used to index the notes and compare the ability to identify NVAF, congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke or transient ischemic attack, vascular disease, age 65 to 74 years, sex category (CHA2DS2-VASc), and Hypertension, Abnormal liver/renal function, Stroke history, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile INR, Elderly, Drug/alcohol usage (HAS-BLED) scores using unstructured data (International Classification of Diseases codes) versus structured and unstructured data from clinical notes. In addition, we analyzed data from 63,296,120 participants in the Optum and Truven databases to determine the NVAF frequency, rates of CHA2DS2‑VASc ≥2, and no contraindications to oral anticoagulants, rates of stroke and death in the untreated population, and first year’s costs after stroke. Results The structured-plus-unstructured method would have identified 3,976,056 additional true NVAF cases (P<.001) and improved sensitivity for CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores compared with the structured data alone (P=.002 and P<.001, respectively), causing a 32.1% improvement. For the United States, this method would prevent an estimated 176,537 strokes, save 10,575 lives, and save >US $13.5 billion. Conclusions Artificial intelligence–informed bio-surveillance combining NLP of free-text information with structured EHR data improves data completeness, prevents thousands of strokes, and saves lives and funds. This method is applicable to many disorders with profound public health consequences.

Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.