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  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Whelan, Darius; Carroll, Claire; Grogan, Bernadette;
    Publisher: Mental Health Reform and School of Law, University College Cork
    Country: Ireland

    Toolkit on the Mental Health Act, 2001 The School of Law, University College Cork, has developed a Mental Health Act, 2001 Toolkit in partnership with Mental Health Reform. When people with mental health difficulties are admitted to mental health units, either on a voluntary or involuntary basis, it is vital that user-friendly, accessible, information is available regarding human rights. Access to this information is essential for people with mental health difficulties, their family members, advocates, supporters and carers. The Mental Health Act, 2001 Toolkit will be published on Mental Health Reform's website and will include information on topics such as the following: What are the main human rights in Mental Health law? What is the Mental Health Act? Can I make an Advance Healthcare Directive? The Role and Rights of my Supporters / Family / Carers Approved Centres and What to Expect. My Rights as a' Voluntary Patient'. My Rights as an 'Involuntary Patient'. Mental Health Tribunals Explained. Complaints, Advocacy and Activism. The Toolkit will be a vital means of empowerment, enabling people to become educated about their rights, so that they can exercise and claim those rights. This aids fuller realisation of rights provided by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), the Irish Constitution, and other human rights documents. The Toolkit was drafted in consultation with Mental Health Reform's member organisations, through a series of online and in-person consultation meetings. The meetings were attended by a wide variety of people, including people with lived experience of mental health difficulties, family members, staff and supporters of organisations. This project was funded by the Irish Research Council. The researcher was Darius Whelan and the Research Assistant was Claire Carroll. The co-ordinator from Mental Health Reform was Ber Grogan.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Campbell, Dominic; Teevan, David;
    Publisher: Irish Arts Festivals Archive
    Country: Ireland

    IAFA Oral History Project comprises first-hand accounts by key members of Irish arts festivals. The project was established to complement and enhance the Irish Arts Festivals Archive collection, with each of the oral histories relating to a festival that has deposited, or is committed to depositing, its archive with IAFA. These collections, which provide unique insights into the contribution of festivals to the arts, cultural and economic life of their communities, are part of the UCD Cultural Heritage Collections, and are held in UCD Archives, in the James Joyce Library. This interview took place on 17th December 2021 using an online video communications platform. University College Dublin University College Dublin Foundation UCD Arts and Humanities Support Fund

  • Research data . Film . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stifter, David; Hayden, Deborah; White, Nora; Forsyth, Katherine; Kasten, Megan; Bălteanu, Daniel;
    Country: Ireland

    A short video about the AHRC/IRC-funded OG(H)AM project

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nag, Rajat; Bose, Madhumala; Chhaya, Rhea Sanjiv; Roufou, Styliani; Katsini, Lydia; Feliciano, Rodney; Misiou, Ourania; Malliaroudaki, Maria Ioanna; Guzmán-Luna, Paola; Talari, Gopaiah; +9 more
    Publisher: University College Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The PROTECT Training Network develops and integrates modelling capabilities to assess the effects of climate change on food safety. This comic is aimed at primary school children (ages 6 years upwards) to illustrate the main concepts and outcomes from the PROTECT Training Network in an uncomplicated and fun way. European Commission Horizon 2020 European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 813329

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Erne, Roland; Nowak, Jörg;
    Country: Ireland

    13th International Labour and Employment Relations Association (ILERA) European Congress, Barcelona, Spain 8-10 September 2022 This paper is based on a new database of 355 transnational socioeconomic protest events in Europe reported by labor-related newsletters, websites, and specialized media outlets from 1997 to 2020. Although the strength of European unions has been declining during this period, the number of transnational socioeconomic protests increased from 62 (1997-2002) to 121 (2015-2020). Our database enables us to test two structural hypotheses for this rise, namely an economic and a political one. Our findings confirm that the exposure to horizontal, competitive economic pressures within an ever more integrated European marketplace cannot explain the rise of transnational socioeconomic protest since 1997. Instead, our figures suggest that increased vertical political integration pressures by supranational EU authorities and corporate headquarters of multinational firms are driving the increasing salience of transnational socioeconomic protest. European Commission Horizon 2020 European Research Council European Trade Union Institute

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Biemans, Floor; Arnoux, Sandie; More, Simon John; Tratalos, Jamie A.; Gavey, Lawrence; Ezanno, Pauline;
    Country: Ireland

    Model to simulate the spread of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) within and between herds via trade movements between dairy herds. Control measures can be applied: - trade movements rewiring to foster exchanges between herds of the same status (according to within-herd prevalence) (w option) - hygiene, by decreasing calf exposure to bacterial environment (e option) - early culling of high shedders (k option). Model is mechanistic (infection dynamics) and data-driven (movements and demography), stochastic, discrete-time and individual-based. Requirements: C++ compiler: g++ (tested version: 7.2.0) => sudo apt install g++. Warning: standard library C++11 is required. tclap (version 1.2.1): sudo apt install libtclap-dev.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yan, Yan; Dawson, Kenneth; Cagney, Gerard; Zhang, Wei; Jingji Li; Silveira, Camila P.; Cai, Qi;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: SFI | Defining the dynamic inte... (15/SIRG/3423)

    Recent observations suggest a role for complex nanoscale particulate shape in regulation of specific immune-related cellular and in vivo processes. We suspect that cellular recognition of nanostructure architecture could involve non-molecular inputs, including cellular transduction of nanoscale spatially resolved stresses induced by complex shape. Here we report nanoscale shape-dependent control of the cellular epigenome. ChIP-Seq sequencing datasets are provided.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zhao, Xianxian; Flynn, Damian;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: Ireland

    IFAC-CPES 2022: 11th Symposium on Control of Power and Energy Systems, Online, 21-23 June 2022 Grid-forming converters (GFs) are seen as a replacement for synchronous machines in future power systems. Compared with synchronous machines, GFs provide much reduced overcurrent capability and hence they experience current saturation more frequently for the same capacity. Moreover, once in current saturation, GFs have limited regulation capability, and can become unstable if the current limiting control is improperly designed. Hence, in order to enhance GF stability when subject to phase jump down disturbances and current saturation, a combination of virtual impedance (VI) current limiting and scaling current reference saturation control is proposed. A relatively large virtual reactance-resistance ratio is also recommended. To speed up GF recovery, an (increased) transient P/f droop gain is proposed for downward phase jumps, but not fault conditions. Simulation studies on a simple system under large phase-jump events, i.e. ±60°, confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Science Foundation Ireland

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zhao, Xianxian; Flynn, Damian;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: Ireland

    IFAC-CPES 2022: 11th Symposium on Control of Power and Energy Systems, Online, 21-23 June 2022 The transient stability of a power system depends on the relative divergence of angular speeds between voltage sources during a fault disturbance. A unified angular speed control strategy is proposed here for grid-forming and synchronous machine voltage sources. Specifically, for a system consisting only of grid-forming converters (GFs), the virtual angular speed of all GFs is proposed to be frozen to the pre-fault value, while for a system with a mix of grid-forming converters and synchronous machines (SMs), the virtual angular speed of the GFs should be frozen to the weighted mean of the SM rotor speeds. The proposed freezing techniques are designed to be effective for short-circuit faults, and to be indifferent to phase-jump events. Simulation studies are performed on 100% GF and mixed GF/SM systems for both 3-phase fault and phase-jump events, for a range of GF control settings and system conditions, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the virtual angular speed freezing techniques. Science Foundation Ireland

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leahy, Paul G.; Ruth, Albert;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: SFI | Paul Leahy (07/EN/E010)

    Vertical Profiles of Urban wind speed, wind direction and turbulence measured by LiDAR on campus of University College Cork, Ireland ================================= README version 1.3, 21/07/2022 ================================== Contact info: Paul Leahy, University College Cork paul.leahy@ucc.ie | +353 21 4902017 ================================ Contents 1. Measurement location and time period 2. What is measured (brief description) 3. Instrumentation 4. CSV file detailed descriptions ================================ 1. Measurement location and time period: North roof of Kane Building, University College Cork (UCC), Ireland. Lat 51 d 53 m 34 s N. Long 8 d 29 m 39 s W. Roof is c. 39 m above sea level, and c. 26 m above ground level (ground level reference point is the car park West of the UCC Kane Building). The measurements were taken over a time period of several months in the years 2013 / 2014. ================================= 2. What is measured (brief description): * LiDAR Wind speed (horizontal and vertical), wind direction, turbulence intensity at 5 altitudes; reference point (0 m) for these altitudes is the top of the LiDAR instrument c. 1.2 m above roof level. * Air temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity. * Wind speed and direction from an ultrasonic anemometer mounted on top of the instrument (c. 1.2 m above roof level). * 10-minute average values (2 files) and high-resolution (c. 23 sec) data (1 file) are provided. See 'CSV file detailed description' below for detailed information. * Diagnostic information. ================================= 2.1 Surrounding terrain: Surrounding area is urban/suburban. The aspect is northerly. To the West: 2-5 storey buildings, open spaces, suburban. To the South: 2-3 storey buildings, open spaces, trees, river. To the East: 2-3 storey buildings, open spaces. To the North: A higher section of the Kane Building roof (47 m asl), 1-3 storey buildings, suburban. ================================= 3. Instrumentation: ZephIR 175 continuous wave wind profiling LiDAR with integrated sonic anemometer, temperature, humidity, air temperature pressure sensors and GPS. ================================= 4. CSV files detailed description: 4.1 Data on 10-minute averages: Filename 05092013-03122013_10min_res.csv contains: 10 minute averaged data from 05/09/2013 to 03/12/2013. Measurement altitudes: 148 m, 90 m, 69 m, 44 m, 19m above instrument level. Filename 03122013-07082014_10min_res.csv contains: 10 minute averaged data from: 03/12/2013 to 07/08/2014. Measurement altitudes: 148 m, 90 m, 50 m, 35 m, 15 m above instrument level. Note: from 19/06/2014 onwards, LiDAR data missing (MET data continues). The first two rows contain header information. Row 1 contains location information (GPS record)) and the measurement altitudes for wind speeds. Sample GPS record: N51535775W8296590 = 51 d 53.5775 m North; 8 d 29.6590 m West. Row 2 contains the data column headers including units. Wind speeds at each altitude are recorded: No of Packets (= number of scan units averaged over) [] Wind direction (mean) [deg] Horizontal wind speed (mean) & standard deviation [m/s] Vertical wind speed (mean) & standard deviation [m/s] Horizontal variance [m^2/s^2] Horizontal min [m/s] Horizontal max [m/s] TI (turbulence intensity) [] Other meteorological data: Air temperature [oC] Pressure [mbar] Rel. Humidity [%] Rain indicator [unitless] Higher values indicate more rain during the averaging interval. Wind Speed [m/s] (column 'MET Wind Speed' measured at the top of the instrument by the ultrasonic anemometer) Wind direction [deg] (column 'MET Direction' measured at the top of the instrument by the ultrasonic anemometer). Other housekeeping and diagnostic data: Instrument tilt [deg] Instrument bearing [deg] GPS data [degrees N, degrees W] Battery voltage [V] Optics, electronics and battery temperature [oC] ===================================================== 4.2 Data with high time resolution (~23 s): Filename 05092013-11112013_23s_res.csv contains: High resolution data from 05/09/2013 to 11/11/2013 Measurement altitudes: 148 m, 90 m, 69 m, 44 m, 19m. Note on time resolution: The time resolution of processed wind measurements is c. 3 seconds per wind level, and around 8 seconds to reset to the first level. A full wind profile measurement at 5 altitudes therefore takes around (5 x 3) + 8 = 23 s to complete. The raw scanning resolution of the instrument is higher than this, as each wind measurement is an average of several values. Row 1 contains location information (lat, long) and the vertical measurement levels for wind speeds. Row 2 contains the data column headers including units. Wind speeds at each altitude are recorded: No of Packets (= scan units averaged over) [] Wind direction (mean) [deg] Horizontal wind speed (mean) & standard deviation [m/s] Vertical wind speed (mean) & standard deviation [m/s] Horizontal variance [m^2/s^2] not defined as measurement interval is too short. Horizontal min [m/s] not defined as measurement interval is too short. Horizontal max [m/s] not defined as measurement interval is too short. TI (turbulence intensity) [] not defined as measurement interval is too short. Other meteorological data: Air temperature [oC] Pressure [mbar] Rel. Humidity [%] Rain indicator [unitless] Higher values indicate more rain during the scanning interval. Wind Speed [m/s] (column 'MET Wind Speed' measured at the top of the instrument by the ultrasonic anemometer) Wind direction [deg] (column 'MET Direction' measured at the top of the instrument by the ultrasonic anemometer. Other housekeeping and diagnostic data: Instrument tilt [deg] Instrument bearing [deg] GPS data [degrees N, degrees W] Battery voltage [V] Optics, electronics and battery temperature [oC] ===================================================== 4.3 Quality control indicators: 9998 atmospheric conditions which adversely affect LiDAR wind speed measurements e.g. fog 9999 high quality wind speed measurement not possible e.g. very low wind speed or obscuration of optical path Status Flag 'Green' => good ======================================================= Supported by University College Cork Strategic Research Fund and Science Foundation Ireland Stokes Lectureship in Wind Energy Engineering (grant no. 07/EN/E010), with support from Enerco Energy Ltd.

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5,168 Research products, page 1 of 517
  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Whelan, Darius; Carroll, Claire; Grogan, Bernadette;
    Publisher: Mental Health Reform and School of Law, University College Cork
    Country: Ireland

    Toolkit on the Mental Health Act, 2001 The School of Law, University College Cork, has developed a Mental Health Act, 2001 Toolkit in partnership with Mental Health Reform. When people with mental health difficulties are admitted to mental health units, either on a voluntary or involuntary basis, it is vital that user-friendly, accessible, information is available regarding human rights. Access to this information is essential for people with mental health difficulties, their family members, advocates, supporters and carers. The Mental Health Act, 2001 Toolkit will be published on Mental Health Reform's website and will include information on topics such as the following: What are the main human rights in Mental Health law? What is the Mental Health Act? Can I make an Advance Healthcare Directive? The Role and Rights of my Supporters / Family / Carers Approved Centres and What to Expect. My Rights as a' Voluntary Patient'. My Rights as an 'Involuntary Patient'. Mental Health Tribunals Explained. Complaints, Advocacy and Activism. The Toolkit will be a vital means of empowerment, enabling people to become educated about their rights, so that they can exercise and claim those rights. This aids fuller realisation of rights provided by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), the Irish Constitution, and other human rights documents. The Toolkit was drafted in consultation with Mental Health Reform's member organisations, through a series of online and in-person consultation meetings. The meetings were attended by a wide variety of people, including people with lived experience of mental health difficulties, family members, staff and supporters of organisations. This project was funded by the Irish Research Council. The researcher was Darius Whelan and the Research Assistant was Claire Carroll. The co-ordinator from Mental Health Reform was Ber Grogan.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Campbell, Dominic; Teevan, David;
    Publisher: Irish Arts Festivals Archive
    Country: Ireland

    IAFA Oral History Project comprises first-hand accounts by key members of Irish arts festivals. The project was established to complement and enhance the Irish Arts Festivals Archive collection, with each of the oral histories relating to a festival that has deposited, or is committed to depositing, its archive with IAFA. These collections, which provide unique insights into the contribution of festivals to the arts, cultural and economic life of their communities, are part of the UCD Cultural Heritage Collections, and are held in UCD Archives, in the James Joyce Library. This interview took place on 17th December 2021 using an online video communications platform. University College Dublin University College Dublin Foundation UCD Arts and Humanities Support Fund

  • Research data . Film . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stifter, David; Hayden, Deborah; White, Nora; Forsyth, Katherine; Kasten, Megan; Bălteanu, Daniel;
    Country: Ireland

    A short video about the AHRC/IRC-funded OG(H)AM project

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nag, Rajat; Bose, Madhumala; Chhaya, Rhea Sanjiv; Roufou, Styliani; Katsini, Lydia; Feliciano, Rodney; Misiou, Ourania; Malliaroudaki, Maria Ioanna; Guzmán-Luna, Paola; Talari, Gopaiah; +9 more
    Publisher: University College Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The PROTECT Training Network develops and integrates modelling capabilities to assess the effects of climate change on food safety. This comic is aimed at primary school children (ages 6 years upwards) to illustrate the main concepts and outcomes from the PROTECT Training Network in an uncomplicated and fun way. European Commission Horizon 2020 European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 813329

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Erne, Roland; Nowak, Jörg;
    Country: Ireland

    13th International Labour and Employment Relations Association (ILERA) European Congress, Barcelona, Spain 8-10 September 2022 This paper is based on a new database of 355 transnational socioeconomic protest events in Europe reported by labor-related newsletters, websites, and specialized media outlets from 1997 to 2020. Although the strength of European unions has been declining during this period, the number of transnational socioeconomic protests increased from 62 (1997-2002) to 121 (2015-2020). Our database enables us to test two structural hypotheses for this rise, namely an economic and a political one. Our findings confirm that the exposure to horizontal, competitive economic pressures within an ever more integrated European marketplace cannot explain the rise of transnational socioeconomic protest since 1997. Instead, our figures suggest that increased vertical political integration pressures by supranational EU authorities and corporate headquarters of multinational firms are driving the increasing salience of transnational socioeconomic protest. European Commission Horizon 2020 European Research Council European Trade Union Institute

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Biemans, Floor; Arnoux, Sandie; More, Simon John; Tratalos, Jamie A.; Gavey, Lawrence; Ezanno, Pauline;
    Country: Ireland

    Model to simulate the spread of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) within and between herds via trade movements between dairy herds. Control measures can be applied: - trade movements rewiring to foster exchanges between herds of the same status (according to within-herd prevalence) (w option) - hygiene, by decreasing calf exposure to bacterial environment (e option) - early culling of high shedders (k option). Model is mechanistic (infection dynamics) and data-driven (movements and demography), stochastic, discrete-time and individual-based. Requirements: C++ compiler: g++ (tested version: 7.2.0) => sudo apt install g++. Warning: standard library C++11 is required. tclap (version 1.2.1): sudo apt install libtclap-dev.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yan, Yan; Dawson, Kenneth; Cagney, Gerard; Zhang, Wei; Jingji Li; Silveira, Camila P.; Cai, Qi;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: SFI | Defining the dynamic inte... (15/SIRG/3423)

    Recent observations suggest a role for complex nanoscale particulate shape in regulation of specific immune-related cellular and in vivo processes. We suspect that cellular recognition of nanostructure architecture could involve non-molecular inputs, including cellular transduction of nanoscale spatially resolved stresses induced by complex shape. Here we report nanoscale shape-dependent control of the cellular epigenome. ChIP-Seq sequencing datasets are provided.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zhao, Xianxian; Flynn, Damian;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: Ireland

    IFAC-CPES 2022: 11th Symposium on Control of Power and Energy Systems, Online, 21-23 June 2022 Grid-forming converters (GFs) are seen as a replacement for synchronous machines in future power systems. Compared with synchronous machines, GFs provide much reduced overcurrent capability and hence they experience current saturation more frequently for the same capacity. Moreover, once in current saturation, GFs have limited regulation capability, and can become unstable if the current limiting control is improperly designed. Hence, in order to enhance GF stability when subject to phase jump down disturbances and current saturation, a combination of virtual impedance (VI) current limiting and scaling current reference saturation control is proposed. A relatively large virtual reactance-resistance ratio is also recommended. To speed up GF recovery, an (increased) transient P/f droop gain is proposed for downward phase jumps, but not fault conditions. Simulation studies on a simple system under large phase-jump events, i.e. ±60°, confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Science Foundation Ireland

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zhao, Xianxian; Flynn, Damian;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: Ireland

    IFAC-CPES 2022: 11th Symposium on Control of Power and Energy Systems, Online, 21-23 June 2022 The transient stability of a power system depends on the relative divergence of angular speeds between voltage sources during a fault disturbance. A unified angular speed control strategy is proposed here for grid-forming and synchronous machine voltage sources. Specifically, for a system consisting only of grid-forming converters (GFs), the virtual angular speed of all GFs is proposed to be frozen to the pre-fault value, while for a system with a mix of grid-forming converters and synchronous machines (SMs), the virtual angular speed of the GFs should be frozen to the weighted mean of the SM rotor speeds. The proposed freezing techniques are designed to be effective for short-circuit faults, and to be indifferent to phase-jump events. Simulation studies are performed on 100% GF and mixed GF/SM systems for both 3-phase fault and phase-jump events, for a range of GF control settings and system conditions, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the virtual angular speed freezing techniques. Science Foundation Ireland

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leahy, Paul G.; Ruth, Albert;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: SFI | Paul Leahy (07/EN/E010)

    Vertical Profiles of Urban wind speed, wind direction and turbulence measured by LiDAR on campus of University College Cork, Ireland ================================= README version 1.3, 21/07/2022 ================================== Contact info: Paul Leahy, University College Cork paul.leahy@ucc.ie | +353 21 4902017 ================================ Contents 1. Measurement location and time period 2. What is measured (brief description) 3. Instrumentation 4. CSV file detailed descriptions ================================ 1. Measurement location and time period: North roof of Kane Building, University College Cork (UCC), Ireland. Lat 51 d 53 m 34 s N. Long 8 d 29 m 39 s W. Roof is c. 39 m above sea level, and c. 26 m above ground level (ground level reference point is the car park West of the UCC Kane Building). The measurements were taken over a time period of several months in the years 2013 / 2014. ================================= 2. What is measured (brief description): * LiDAR Wind speed (horizontal and vertical), wind direction, turbulence intensity at 5 altitudes; reference point (0 m) for these altitudes is the top of the LiDAR instrument c. 1.2 m above roof level. * Air temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity. * Wind speed and direction from an ultrasonic anemometer mounted on top of the instrument (c. 1.2 m above roof level). * 10-minute average values (2 files) and high-resolution (c. 23 sec) data (1 file) are provided. See 'CSV file detailed description' below for detailed information. * Diagnostic information. ================================= 2.1 Surrounding terrain: Surrounding area is urban/suburban. The aspect is northerly. To the West: 2-5 storey buildings, open spaces, suburban. To the South: 2-3 storey buildings, open spaces, trees, river. To the East: 2-3 storey buildings, open spaces. To the North: A higher section of the Kane Building roof (47 m asl), 1-3 storey buildings, suburban. ================================= 3. Instrumentation: ZephIR 175 continuous wave wind profiling LiDAR with integrated sonic anemometer, temperature, humidity, air temperature pressure sensors and GPS. ================================= 4. CSV files detailed description: 4.1 Data on 10-minute averages: Filename 05092013-03122013_10min_res.csv contains: 10 minute averaged data from 05/09/2013 to 03/12/2013. Measurement altitudes: 148 m, 90 m, 69 m, 44 m, 19m above instrument level. Filename 03122013-07082014_10min_res.csv contains: 10 minute averaged data from: 03/12/2013 to 07/08/2014. Measurement altitudes: 148 m, 90 m, 50 m, 35 m, 15 m above instrument level. Note: from 19/06/2014 onwards, LiDAR data missing (MET data continues). The first two rows contain header information. Row 1 contains location information (GPS record)) and the measurement altitudes for wind speeds. Sample GPS record: N51535775W8296590 = 51 d 53.5775 m North; 8 d 29.6590 m West. Row 2 contains the data column headers including units. Wind speeds at each altitude are recorded: No of Packets (= number of scan units averaged over) [] Wind direction (mean) [deg] Horizontal wind speed (mean) & standard deviation [m/s] Vertical wind speed (mean) & standard deviation [m/s] Horizontal variance [m^2/s^2] Horizontal min [m/s] Horizontal max [m/s] TI (turbulence intensity) [] Other meteorological data: Air temperature [oC] Pressure [mbar] Rel. Humidity [%] Rain indicator [unitless] Higher values indicate more rain during the averaging interval. Wind Speed [m/s] (column 'MET Wind Speed' measured at the top of the instrument by the ultrasonic anemometer) Wind direction [deg] (column 'MET Direction' measured at the top of the instrument by the ultrasonic anemometer). Other housekeeping and diagnostic data: Instrument tilt [deg] Instrument bearing [deg] GPS data [degrees N, degrees W] Battery voltage [V] Optics, electronics and battery temperature [oC] ===================================================== 4.2 Data with high time resolution (~23 s): Filename 05092013-11112013_23s_res.csv contains: High resolution data from 05/09/2013 to 11/11/2013 Measurement altitudes: 148 m, 90 m, 69 m, 44 m, 19m. Note on time resolution: The time resolution of processed wind measurements is c. 3 seconds per wind level, and around 8 seconds to reset to the first level. A full wind profile measurement at 5 altitudes therefore takes around (5 x 3) + 8 = 23 s to complete. The raw scanning resolution of the instrument is higher than this, as each wind measurement is an average of several values. Row 1 contains location information (lat, long) and the vertical measurement levels for wind speeds. Row 2 contains the data column headers including units. Wind speeds at each altitude are recorded: No of Packets (= scan units averaged over) [] Wind direction (mean) [deg] Horizontal wind speed (mean) & standard deviation [m/s] Vertical wind speed (mean) & standard deviation [m/s] Horizontal variance [m^2/s^2] not defined as measurement interval is too short. Horizontal min [m/s] not defined as measurement interval is too short. Horizontal max [m/s] not defined as measurement interval is too short. TI (turbulence intensity) [] not defined as measurement interval is too short. Other meteorological data: Air temperature [oC] Pressure [mbar] Rel. Humidity [%] Rain indicator [unitless] Higher values indicate more rain during the scanning interval. Wind Speed [m/s] (column 'MET Wind Speed' measured at the top of the instrument by the ultrasonic anemometer) Wind direction [deg] (column 'MET Direction' measured at the top of the instrument by the ultrasonic anemometer. Other housekeeping and diagnostic data: Instrument tilt [deg] Instrument bearing [deg] GPS data [degrees N, degrees W] Battery voltage [V] Optics, electronics and battery temperature [oC] ===================================================== 4.3 Quality control indicators: 9998 atmospheric conditions which adversely affect LiDAR wind speed measurements e.g. fog 9999 high quality wind speed measurement not possible e.g. very low wind speed or obscuration of optical path Status Flag 'Green' => good ======================================================= Supported by University College Cork Strategic Research Fund and Science Foundation Ireland Stokes Lectureship in Wind Energy Engineering (grant no. 07/EN/E010), with support from Enerco Energy Ltd.

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