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335 Research products, page 1 of 34

  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage
  • Rural Digital Europe

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  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | RISIS 2 (824091), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | IMARINE (283644), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) API is a library containing classes shared across gcat* components. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat-api/releases/tag/v2.0.0

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | D4SCIENCE-II (239019), EC | RISIS 2 (824091), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | SoBigData (654024),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) Client is a library designed to interact with REST API exposed by the gCat Service. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat-client/releases/tag/v2.4.0

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | D4SCIENCE-II (239019), EC | EOSC-Pillar (857650), EC | SoBigData (654024), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | PerformFISH (727610), EC | AGINFRA PLUS (731001), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) Service allows any client to publish on the gCube Catalogue. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat/releases/tag/v2.3.0

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . InteractiveResource . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jana Ameye; Mario Hernandez; Tim Van de Voorde;
    Publisher: BELSPO
    Country: Belgium

    The main objective of the Belspo-funded LIMAMAL project was to support archaeologists in creating 3D terrain visualizations based on Lidar data and Pléiades stereoscopic imagery, and a combination or “fusion” thereof. A case study was developed to demonstrate the application of Pléiades imagery and light detection and ranging (lidar) technologies for prospection and visualization of the Mesoamerican archaeological landscape. Based on this case study, guidelines in English and Spanish have been developed to explain the technical processing. The project involved a stakeholder: the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), a Mexican federal government institution responsible for research, conservation, protection and spreading of knowledge on Mexican cultural heritage. The case study and guidelines were presented to the stakeholder and other interested parties during several meetings held during a short mission to Yucatan, Mexico in the spring of 2022.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tueller, Peter;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    There are many environments on Earth that are so remote that they are inhospitable to humans and conventional sensing equipment. Yet, these environments can hold information of ecological and cultural significance that cannot be gathered anywhere else. Current methods of gathering information in these environments give an important window, but utilizing modern sensors to capture 3D information can allow us to interpret existing data and understand the environments in new and unique ways. This thesis will demonstrate how 3D capture can improve data collection and interpretation in three separate remote environments. First, I will show how Synthetic Aperture Sonar on autonomous underwater vehicles paired with optimized feature detectors can improve target detection and seafloor recognition. Next, I will show how RGBD cameras, photogrammetry, and LIDAR can be used in isolated Guatemalan archaeological excavations to visualize and contextualize ancient sites in relation to each other and to our broader understanding of Mayan history. Finally, I will demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of RGBD cameras for fish stock assessment through detection and length and biomass measurement in open waters and in aquaculture.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jannke, Helen Anne;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    Eastern Mediterranean archaeological sites record intensified marine resource use among coastal hunter-gatherer groups in the Upper Mesolithic (~10.5-8.5 ka (1)) and into the Early Neolithic, followed by a decline in fishing effort as the widespread use of agriculture and pastoralism was established in the Neolithic (~8.5-4 ka (2)). We used a fish microfossil record of teeth, bones, scales, and otoliths deposited in an Aegean deep-sea sediment core to show that pelagic fish availability may have played a role in shaping this dietary evolution. We found elevated deposition of pelagic fish remains during what broadly corresponds to the Mesolithic and Early Neolithic periods, with fish fossil abundance increasing 12-fold starting around ~10 ka. The abundance of fish remains then declines in the open ocean during the Middle-Late Neolithic, with fish fossils decreasing 6-fold after ~6 ka. Our findings reveal that fish were abundant when Mesolithic and Early Neolithic coastal hunter-gatherer groups were exploiting them more heavily, and diminished as human fish use declined and widespread agriculture was established in the Neolithic. We infer that environmental changes in fish availability altered the costs and benefits of the different subsistence strategies, with fishing being a productive strategy during the Upper Mesolithic, and reliance on domesticated resources becoming increasingly advantageous as fish availability declined into the Neolithic. We argue that Early Holocene environmental changes influenced not only the uppermost marine trophic levels, but also the choices and economies of early humans, ultimately favoring the development of agriculture in the Neolithic.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Smyth, Hannah;
    Publisher: University College London UCL

    Research guide and teaching tool for the analysis of digital archives and digital resources in the humanities. Developed from the author's doctoral research and for the postgraduate classes 'Digital resources in the humanities' (Digital Humanities) and 'Concepts and Contexts' (Archives and Records Management) at UCL.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access Indonesian
    Authors: 
    Akmal, S. (Safarov); Mamlakat, K. (Kadirova);
    Publisher: Novateur Publication
    Country: Indonesia

    This article discusses the policy of collectivization in agriculture. It also analyzes the rapid growth of cotton fields as a result of collectivization.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    CSIC - Departamento de Comunicación;
    Publisher: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (España)

    Head of Communication: Abel Grau; Editorial board: Esther M. García Pastor, Alejandro Parrilla García; Writers: Lucía Casas Piñeiro, Isidoro García Cano, Esther M. García Pastor, Carmen Fernández, Ana Iglesias, Mónica Lara del Vigo, Silbia López de Lacalle, Víctor Lloret Blackburn, Alejandro Parrilla García, Belén Remacha; Photography: César Hernández, Álvaro Muñoz Guzmán, Joan Costa, Artur Martínez y Pau Franch; Translation: Fabiola Barraclough. This special issue of ‘CSIC Investiga. Journal of Science’ shows the performance of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) within the EU R&D framewok programme Horizon 2020. It presents reportages on research projects about Qur’an heritage in Europe, the exploration of Mars, the new robots that assist people, more efficient parasites controls in fishery, new sustainable packaging, methods to trace asymptomatic tuberculosis transmisión, and the historic legacy of the Senegal’s region of Pathiana, among others. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Melton, Mallory Anne;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    The emergence of an incipient city represents not only a moment in time, but also the beginnings of a social experiment. Aggregated living introduced new challenges such as the need to feed more mouths than ever before. Yet studying responses to these challenges becomes difficult in the case of early cities as excavations of these contexts do not provide adequate temporal and/or spatial resolution to assess change over time. This dissertation examines subsistence strategies at the archaeological site of La Blanca (900-500 BCE), a Middle Preclassic period incipient city on the Pacific coast of Guatemala with a long history of household excavations. I analyze macrobotanical and microbotanical plant remains from La Blanca to assess both the types of foods used to feed inhabitants and the distribution of intra-site food processing activities across time and space. The analysis of plant remains can provide unique insights into social differentiation in comparison to other commonly used indices, such as the distribution of prestige goods. I rely on Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical construct of social fields to disentangle the study of economic ranking based on prestige goods from economic activities pursued by households. Rather than grouping households by elite or commoner status first and then comparing plant remains second, I look to the plant data first to assess their own non-binary insights into social relations. My research uses Exploratory Data Analysis to investigate spatial and temporal patterning. I integrate a wide variety of techniques including paleoethnobotanical methods (macrobotanical, starch granule, and phytolith analysis), spatial statistics, and Bayesian analysis of radiocarbon dates to conduct intra-site and inter-site comparisons of plant data from the La Blanca site. My results present novel perspectives on subsistence planning in early cities and long-term changes in the regional subsistence practices of Pacific Mexico and Guatemala during the Preclassic period. Spatial statistics reveal that domestic contexts at La Blanca are clustered, identifying five neighborhoods and one additional area with a more complex use history. Comparisons of botanical remains from these six locales indicate that their uses changed over time. Moreover, temporal comparisons illustrate that diversification played a key role in meeting subsistence needs during the Conchas D subphase, the most populous period of the early city’s occupation. Inter-site comparisons with other Early and Middle Preclassic sites on the Pacific Coast indicate that, contrary to expectations, maize intensification predated the initial urbanization of the region. La Blanca also represents the highest taxonomic diversity of the sequence, revealing that diversification is more characteristic of early urbanism on the Pacific Coast than previously considered. Analysis of plant use as a social field does not provide strong evidence of differences in household subsistence strategies by economic ranking, but instead highlights key differences by spatial cluster that are more indicative of early efforts at city planning.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
335 Research products, page 1 of 34
  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | RISIS 2 (824091), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | IMARINE (283644), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) API is a library containing classes shared across gcat* components. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat-api/releases/tag/v2.0.0

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754), EC | EGI-Engage (654142), EC | PARTHENOS (654119), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | D4SCIENCE-II (239019), EC | RISIS 2 (824091), EC | Blue Cloud (862409), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | SoBigData (654024),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) Client is a library designed to interact with REST API exposed by the gCat Service. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat-client/releases/tag/v2.4.0

  • Research software . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frosini, Luca;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: EC | ARIADNEplus (823914), EC | ENVRI PLUS (654182), EC | D4SCIENCE-II (239019), EC | EOSC-Pillar (857650), EC | SoBigData (654024), EC | D4SCIENCE (212488), EC | PerformFISH (727610), EC | AGINFRA PLUS (731001), EC | BlueBRIDGE (675680), EC | EUBRAZILOPENBIO (288754),...

    gCube Catalogue (gCat) Service allows any client to publish on the gCube Catalogue. gCube is an open-source software toolkit used for building and operating Hybrid Data Infrastructures enabling the dynamic deployment of Virtual Research Environments, such as the D4Science Infrastructure, by favouring the realisation of reuse-oriented policies. gCube has been used to successfully build and operate infrastructures and virtual research environments for application domains ranging from biodiversity to environmental data management and cultural heritage. gCube offers components supporting typical data management workflows including data access, curation, processing, and visualisation on a large set of data typologies ranging from primary biodiversity data to geospatial and tabular data. D4Science is a Hybrid Data Infrastructure combining over 500 software components and integrating data from more than 50 different data providers into a coherent and managed system of hardware, software, and data resources. The D4Science infrastructure drastically reduces the cost of ownership, maintenance, and operation thanks to the exploitation of gCube. The source code of this software version is available at: https://code-repo.d4science.org/gCubeSystem/gcat/releases/tag/v2.3.0

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . InteractiveResource . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jana Ameye; Mario Hernandez; Tim Van de Voorde;
    Publisher: BELSPO
    Country: Belgium

    The main objective of the Belspo-funded LIMAMAL project was to support archaeologists in creating 3D terrain visualizations based on Lidar data and Pléiades stereoscopic imagery, and a combination or “fusion” thereof. A case study was developed to demonstrate the application of Pléiades imagery and light detection and ranging (lidar) technologies for prospection and visualization of the Mesoamerican archaeological landscape. Based on this case study, guidelines in English and Spanish have been developed to explain the technical processing. The project involved a stakeholder: the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), a Mexican federal government institution responsible for research, conservation, protection and spreading of knowledge on Mexican cultural heritage. The case study and guidelines were presented to the stakeholder and other interested parties during several meetings held during a short mission to Yucatan, Mexico in the spring of 2022.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tueller, Peter;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    There are many environments on Earth that are so remote that they are inhospitable to humans and conventional sensing equipment. Yet, these environments can hold information of ecological and cultural significance that cannot be gathered anywhere else. Current methods of gathering information in these environments give an important window, but utilizing modern sensors to capture 3D information can allow us to interpret existing data and understand the environments in new and unique ways. This thesis will demonstrate how 3D capture can improve data collection and interpretation in three separate remote environments. First, I will show how Synthetic Aperture Sonar on autonomous underwater vehicles paired with optimized feature detectors can improve target detection and seafloor recognition. Next, I will show how RGBD cameras, photogrammetry, and LIDAR can be used in isolated Guatemalan archaeological excavations to visualize and contextualize ancient sites in relation to each other and to our broader understanding of Mayan history. Finally, I will demonstrate the effectiveness and potential of RGBD cameras for fish stock assessment through detection and length and biomass measurement in open waters and in aquaculture.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jannke, Helen Anne;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    Eastern Mediterranean archaeological sites record intensified marine resource use among coastal hunter-gatherer groups in the Upper Mesolithic (~10.5-8.5 ka (1)) and into the Early Neolithic, followed by a decline in fishing effort as the widespread use of agriculture and pastoralism was established in the Neolithic (~8.5-4 ka (2)). We used a fish microfossil record of teeth, bones, scales, and otoliths deposited in an Aegean deep-sea sediment core to show that pelagic fish availability may have played a role in shaping this dietary evolution. We found elevated deposition of pelagic fish remains during what broadly corresponds to the Mesolithic and Early Neolithic periods, with fish fossil abundance increasing 12-fold starting around ~10 ka. The abundance of fish remains then declines in the open ocean during the Middle-Late Neolithic, with fish fossils decreasing 6-fold after ~6 ka. Our findings reveal that fish were abundant when Mesolithic and Early Neolithic coastal hunter-gatherer groups were exploiting them more heavily, and diminished as human fish use declined and widespread agriculture was established in the Neolithic. We infer that environmental changes in fish availability altered the costs and benefits of the different subsistence strategies, with fishing being a productive strategy during the Upper Mesolithic, and reliance on domesticated resources becoming increasingly advantageous as fish availability declined into the Neolithic. We argue that Early Holocene environmental changes influenced not only the uppermost marine trophic levels, but also the choices and economies of early humans, ultimately favoring the development of agriculture in the Neolithic.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Smyth, Hannah;
    Publisher: University College London UCL

    Research guide and teaching tool for the analysis of digital archives and digital resources in the humanities. Developed from the author's doctoral research and for the postgraduate classes 'Digital resources in the humanities' (Digital Humanities) and 'Concepts and Contexts' (Archives and Records Management) at UCL.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access Indonesian
    Authors: 
    Akmal, S. (Safarov); Mamlakat, K. (Kadirova);
    Publisher: Novateur Publication
    Country: Indonesia

    This article discusses the policy of collectivization in agriculture. It also analyzes the rapid growth of cotton fields as a result of collectivization.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    CSIC - Departamento de Comunicación;
    Publisher: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (España)

    Head of Communication: Abel Grau; Editorial board: Esther M. García Pastor, Alejandro Parrilla García; Writers: Lucía Casas Piñeiro, Isidoro García Cano, Esther M. García Pastor, Carmen Fernández, Ana Iglesias, Mónica Lara del Vigo, Silbia López de Lacalle, Víctor Lloret Blackburn, Alejandro Parrilla García, Belén Remacha; Photography: César Hernández, Álvaro Muñoz Guzmán, Joan Costa, Artur Martínez y Pau Franch; Translation: Fabiola Barraclough. This special issue of ‘CSIC Investiga. Journal of Science’ shows the performance of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) within the EU R&D framewok programme Horizon 2020. It presents reportages on research projects about Qur’an heritage in Europe, the exploration of Mars, the new robots that assist people, more efficient parasites controls in fishery, new sustainable packaging, methods to trace asymptomatic tuberculosis transmisión, and the historic legacy of the Senegal’s region of Pathiana, among others. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Melton, Mallory Anne;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    The emergence of an incipient city represents not only a moment in time, but also the beginnings of a social experiment. Aggregated living introduced new challenges such as the need to feed more mouths than ever before. Yet studying responses to these challenges becomes difficult in the case of early cities as excavations of these contexts do not provide adequate temporal and/or spatial resolution to assess change over time. This dissertation examines subsistence strategies at the archaeological site of La Blanca (900-500 BCE), a Middle Preclassic period incipient city on the Pacific coast of Guatemala with a long history of household excavations. I analyze macrobotanical and microbotanical plant remains from La Blanca to assess both the types of foods used to feed inhabitants and the distribution of intra-site food processing activities across time and space. The analysis of plant remains can provide unique insights into social differentiation in comparison to other commonly used indices, such as the distribution of prestige goods. I rely on Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical construct of social fields to disentangle the study of economic ranking based on prestige goods from economic activities pursued by households. Rather than grouping households by elite or commoner status first and then comparing plant remains second, I look to the plant data first to assess their own non-binary insights into social relations. My research uses Exploratory Data Analysis to investigate spatial and temporal patterning. I integrate a wide variety of techniques including paleoethnobotanical methods (macrobotanical, starch granule, and phytolith analysis), spatial statistics, and Bayesian analysis of radiocarbon dates to conduct intra-site and inter-site comparisons of plant data from the La Blanca site. My results present novel perspectives on subsistence planning in early cities and long-term changes in the regional subsistence practices of Pacific Mexico and Guatemala during the Preclassic period. Spatial statistics reveal that domestic contexts at La Blanca are clustered, identifying five neighborhoods and one additional area with a more complex use history. Comparisons of botanical remains from these six locales indicate that their uses changed over time. Moreover, temporal comparisons illustrate that diversification played a key role in meeting subsistence needs during the Conchas D subphase, the most populous period of the early city’s occupation. Inter-site comparisons with other Early and Middle Preclassic sites on the Pacific Coast indicate that, contrary to expectations, maize intensification predated the initial urbanization of the region. La Blanca also represents the highest taxonomic diversity of the sequence, revealing that diversification is more characteristic of early urbanism on the Pacific Coast than previously considered. Analysis of plant use as a social field does not provide strong evidence of differences in household subsistence strategies by economic ranking, but instead highlights key differences by spatial cluster that are more indicative of early efforts at city planning.

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