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105 Research products, page 1 of 11

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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . InteractiveResource . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Philip Verhagen; Bjørn P. Bartholdy;
    Publisher: ARCHON Research School of Archaeology
    Country: Netherlands

    This is part 4 of the Rchon statistics course. It continues the basics of statistical testing in R. In this tutorial, we will treat the following statistical testing methods: Mann-Whitney test Kruskal-Wallis test Kolmogorov-Smirnov test Follow the instructions in Instructions Tutorial 4.pdf to start the tutorial. This course was originally created for Archon Research School of Archaeology by Philip Verhagen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Bjørn P. Bartholdy (University of Leiden), and consists of an instruction, a tutorial, a test and two datafiles. All content is CC BY-NC-SA: it can be freely distributed and modified under the condition of proper attribution and non-commercial use. How to cite: Verhagen, P. & B.P. Bartholdy, 2022. "Rchon statistics course, part 3". Amsterdam, ARCHON Research School of Archaeology. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7458108

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . InteractiveResource . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Philip Verhagen; Bjørn P. Bartholdy;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands

    This is part 3 of the Rchon statistics course. It continues the basics of statistical testing in R. In this tutorial, we will treat the following statistical testing methods: chi square test Fisher's exact test Follow the instructions in Instructions Tutorial 3.pdf to start the tutorial. This course was originally created for Archon Research School of Archaeology by Philip Verhagen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Bjørn P. Bartholdy (University of Leiden), and consists of an instruction, a tutorial, a test and two datafiles. All content is CC BY-NC-SA: it can be freely distributed and modified under the condition of proper attribution and non-commercial use. How to cite: Verhagen, P. & B.P. Bartholdy, 2022. "Rchon statistics course, part 3". Amsterdam, ARCHON Research School of Archaeology. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7457698

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lerchi, A.; Krap, T.; Eppenberger, P.; Pedergnana, A.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Residue analysis is an established area of expertise focused on detecting traces of substances found on the surface of objects. It is routinely employed in forensic casework and increasingly incorporated into archaeological investigations.In archaeology, sampling and data interpretation sometimes lacked strict standards, resulting in incorrect residue classifications. In particular, molecular signals of salts of fatty acids identified by FTIR have been, at times, interpreted as evidence for adipocere, a substance formed as a consequence of adipose tissues' degradation.This article reviews and discusses the possibilities and limitations of the analytical protocols used in residue analysis in archaeology. The focus is on three main points: (1) reviewing the decomposition processes and the chemical components of adipocere; (2) highlighting potential misidentifications of adipocere while, at the same time, addressing issues related to residue preservation and contamination; and (3) proposing new research avenues to identify adipocere on archaeological objects.(c) 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rulkens, C.C.S.; Van Eyghen, Hans; Pear, Rachel; Peels, R.; Bouter, Lex; Stols-Witlox, Maartje; van den Brink, Gijsbert; Meloni, Sabrina; Buijsen, Edwin; van Woudenberg, René;
    Publisher: Center for Open Sciences
    Country: Netherlands

    At the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, we have set out to explore the strengths and limitations of replication studies in the humanities in practice. We are doing so by replicating two original studies: one in the field of art history, the other in the field of history of science and religion. In this blog, we outline the design, purposes, and aims of these projects and explore some of the challenges.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Berckel Smit, Floris; Coussement, Alexia;
    Publisher: ECHER Blog
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Parrini, I.; Luca, F.; Rao, C.M.; Parise, G.; Micali, L.R.; Musumeci, G.; La Meir, M.; Colivicchi, F.; Gulizia, M.M.; Gelsomino, S.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background and aim. Cancer and atrial fibrillation (AF) may be associated, and anticoagulation, either with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), is necessary to prevent thromboembolic events by reducing the risk of bleeding. The log incidence rate ratio (IRR) and 95% confidence interval were used as index statistics. Higgin's I-2 test was adopted to assess statistical inconsistencies by considering interstudy variations, defined by values ranging from 0 to 100%. I-2 values of less than 40% are associated with very low heterogeneity among the studies; values between 40% and 75% indicate moderate heterogeneity, and those greater than 75% suggest severe heterogeneity. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the safety and efficacy of VKAs and DOACs in oncologic patients with AF. Methods. A meta-analysis was conducted comparing VKAs to DOACs in terms of thromboembolic events and bleeding. A meta-regression was conducted to investigate the differences in efficacy and safety between four different DOACs. Moreover, a sub-analysis on active-cancer-only patients was conducted. Results. A total of eight papers were included. The log incidence rate ratio (IRR) for thromboembolic events between the two groups was -0.69 (p 0.9). The Log IRR was -0.38 (p = 0.008) for ischemic stroke, -0.43 (p = 0.02) for myocardial infarction, -0.39 (p = 0.45) for arterial embolism, and -1.04 (p = 0.003) for venous thromboembolism. The log IRR for bleeding events was -0.43 (p < 0.005), and the meta-regression revealed no statistical difference (p = 0.7). The log IRR of hemorrhagic stroke, major bleeding, and clinically relevant non-major bleeding between the VKA and DOAC groups was -0.51 (p < 0.0001), -0.45 (p = 0.03), and 0.0045 (p = 0.97), respectively. Similar results were found in active-cancer patients for all the endpoints except for clinically-relevant non-major bleedings. Conclusions. DOACs showed better efficacy and safety outcomes than VKAs. No difference was found between types of DOACs.

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scholten, Mira; Economisch publiek recht; RENFORCE / Regulering en handhaving;
    Publisher: SSRN
    Country: Netherlands

    Agencification phenomenon in the EU has led to concerns about controls over EU agencies’ actions. As the quantity and ‘quality’, i.e., strength of de jure powers, of EU agencies have grown in the last decades, so does the system of control over agencies show its development. The controls over all EU agencies with the de jure decision-making powers as well as the European Central Bank within the Single Supervisory Mechanism have been supported with the establishment of Boards of Appeal, which count 9 entities. Like with the agencification phenomenon however, the establishment and characteristics of the Boards vary greatly from agency to agency without clear indications as to why the differences (should) exist and what exact role and how much discretion (should) be given to the Boards. As this unclarities put the legitimacy of the system of controls of EU agencies under pressure, an attempt to build a common system of review of agency action by the Boards seems desirable. To contribute to this ultimate goal of our study, this chapter offers a historical overview of agencification and review of agency action in the EU, rationales behind the creation of agencies’ appeal bodies and an attempt of classification of different boards to enhance comprehension and development of a common system of review of agency action. For learning purposes, we look at the system of administrative review in the US. We base our analysis on relevant secondary legislation, such as agencies’ founding acts, rules of procedure, case-law in the EU and in the US and relevant academic literature.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evans, Antony M.; Rosenbusch, Hannes; Zeelenberg, Marcel;
    Country: Netherlands

    Prosociality (measured with economic games) is correlated with individual differences in psychological constructs (measured with self-report scales). We review how methods from natural language processing, a subfield of computer science focused on processing natural text, can be applied to understand the semantic content of scales measuring psychological constructs correlated with prosociality. Methods for clustering language and assessing similarity between text documents can be used to assess the novelty (or redundancy) of new scales, to understand the overlap among different psychological constructs, and to compare different measures of the same construct. These examples illustrate how natural language processing methods can augment traditional survey- and game-based approaches to studying individual differences in prosociality.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sarti, Gabriele; Nissim, Malvina;
    Publisher: arXiv
    Country: Netherlands

    The T5 model and its unified text-to-text paradigm contributed in advancing the state-of-the-art for many natural language processing tasks. While some multilingual variants of the T5 model have recently been introduced, their performances were found to provide suboptimal performances for languages other than English if compared to monolingual variants. We are motivated by these findings to introduce IT5, the first family of encoder-decoder transformer models pretrained specifically on Italian. We perform a thorough cleaning of a web-crawled Italian corpus including more than 40 billion words and use it to pretrain three IT5 models of different sizes. The performance of IT5 models and their multilingual counterparts is then evaluated on a broad range of natural language understanding and generation benchmarks for Italian. We find the monolingual IT5 models to provide the best scale-to-performance ratio across tested models, consistently outperforming their multilingual counterparts and setting a new state-of-the-art for most Italian conditional language generation tasks.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hollander, Hella; Wright, Holly; Geser, Guntram; Ronzino, Paola; Bassett, Sheena; Massara, Flavia; Doorn, P.K.;
    Publisher: ARIADNEplus
    Country: Netherlands

    This interim report, “Policies and Good Practices for FAIR Data Management” describes the activities carried out by the different partners during the first 2 and a half years of the ARIADNEplus project, as well as the results achieved through the work package on the following topics: • Support the creation of FAIR data in the archaeological sector • Define and spread guidelines to good practices in archaeological data management • Adapt standard quality criteria for datasets and data to the archaeological case, and support their implementation among users.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
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Include:
105 Research products, page 1 of 11
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . InteractiveResource . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Philip Verhagen; Bjørn P. Bartholdy;
    Publisher: ARCHON Research School of Archaeology
    Country: Netherlands

    This is part 4 of the Rchon statistics course. It continues the basics of statistical testing in R. In this tutorial, we will treat the following statistical testing methods: Mann-Whitney test Kruskal-Wallis test Kolmogorov-Smirnov test Follow the instructions in Instructions Tutorial 4.pdf to start the tutorial. This course was originally created for Archon Research School of Archaeology by Philip Verhagen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Bjørn P. Bartholdy (University of Leiden), and consists of an instruction, a tutorial, a test and two datafiles. All content is CC BY-NC-SA: it can be freely distributed and modified under the condition of proper attribution and non-commercial use. How to cite: Verhagen, P. & B.P. Bartholdy, 2022. "Rchon statistics course, part 3". Amsterdam, ARCHON Research School of Archaeology. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7458108

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . InteractiveResource . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Philip Verhagen; Bjørn P. Bartholdy;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands

    This is part 3 of the Rchon statistics course. It continues the basics of statistical testing in R. In this tutorial, we will treat the following statistical testing methods: chi square test Fisher's exact test Follow the instructions in Instructions Tutorial 3.pdf to start the tutorial. This course was originally created for Archon Research School of Archaeology by Philip Verhagen (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) and Bjørn P. Bartholdy (University of Leiden), and consists of an instruction, a tutorial, a test and two datafiles. All content is CC BY-NC-SA: it can be freely distributed and modified under the condition of proper attribution and non-commercial use. How to cite: Verhagen, P. & B.P. Bartholdy, 2022. "Rchon statistics course, part 3". Amsterdam, ARCHON Research School of Archaeology. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7457698

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lerchi, A.; Krap, T.; Eppenberger, P.; Pedergnana, A.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Residue analysis is an established area of expertise focused on detecting traces of substances found on the surface of objects. It is routinely employed in forensic casework and increasingly incorporated into archaeological investigations.In archaeology, sampling and data interpretation sometimes lacked strict standards, resulting in incorrect residue classifications. In particular, molecular signals of salts of fatty acids identified by FTIR have been, at times, interpreted as evidence for adipocere, a substance formed as a consequence of adipose tissues' degradation.This article reviews and discusses the possibilities and limitations of the analytical protocols used in residue analysis in archaeology. The focus is on three main points: (1) reviewing the decomposition processes and the chemical components of adipocere; (2) highlighting potential misidentifications of adipocere while, at the same time, addressing issues related to residue preservation and contamination; and (3) proposing new research avenues to identify adipocere on archaeological objects.(c) 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rulkens, C.C.S.; Van Eyghen, Hans; Pear, Rachel; Peels, R.; Bouter, Lex; Stols-Witlox, Maartje; van den Brink, Gijsbert; Meloni, Sabrina; Buijsen, Edwin; van Woudenberg, René;
    Publisher: Center for Open Sciences
    Country: Netherlands

    At the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, we have set out to explore the strengths and limitations of replication studies in the humanities in practice. We are doing so by replicating two original studies: one in the field of art history, the other in the field of history of science and religion. In this blog, we outline the design, purposes, and aims of these projects and explore some of the challenges.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Berckel Smit, Floris; Coussement, Alexia;
    Publisher: ECHER Blog
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Parrini, I.; Luca, F.; Rao, C.M.; Parise, G.; Micali, L.R.; Musumeci, G.; La Meir, M.; Colivicchi, F.; Gulizia, M.M.; Gelsomino, S.;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background and aim. Cancer and atrial fibrillation (AF) may be associated, and anticoagulation, either with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), is necessary to prevent thromboembolic events by reducing the risk of bleeding. The log incidence rate ratio (IRR) and 95% confidence interval were used as index statistics. Higgin's I-2 test was adopted to assess statistical inconsistencies by considering interstudy variations, defined by values ranging from 0 to 100%. I-2 values of less than 40% are associated with very low heterogeneity among the studies; values between 40% and 75% indicate moderate heterogeneity, and those greater than 75% suggest severe heterogeneity. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the safety and efficacy of VKAs and DOACs in oncologic patients with AF. Methods. A meta-analysis was conducted comparing VKAs to DOACs in terms of thromboembolic events and bleeding. A meta-regression was conducted to investigate the differences in efficacy and safety between four different DOACs. Moreover, a sub-analysis on active-cancer-only patients was conducted. Results. A total of eight papers were included. The log incidence rate ratio (IRR) for thromboembolic events between the two groups was -0.69 (p 0.9). The Log IRR was -0.38 (p = 0.008) for ischemic stroke, -0.43 (p = 0.02) for myocardial infarction, -0.39 (p = 0.45) for arterial embolism, and -1.04 (p = 0.003) for venous thromboembolism. The log IRR for bleeding events was -0.43 (p < 0.005), and the meta-regression revealed no statistical difference (p = 0.7). The log IRR of hemorrhagic stroke, major bleeding, and clinically relevant non-major bleeding between the VKA and DOAC groups was -0.51 (p < 0.0001), -0.45 (p = 0.03), and 0.0045 (p = 0.97), respectively. Similar results were found in active-cancer patients for all the endpoints except for clinically-relevant non-major bleedings. Conclusions. DOACs showed better efficacy and safety outcomes than VKAs. No difference was found between types of DOACs.

  • Other research product . Lecture . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scholten, Mira; Economisch publiek recht; RENFORCE / Regulering en handhaving;
    Publisher: SSRN
    Country: Netherlands

    Agencification phenomenon in the EU has led to concerns about controls over EU agencies’ actions. As the quantity and ‘quality’, i.e., strength of de jure powers, of EU agencies have grown in the last decades, so does the system of control over agencies show its development. The controls over all EU agencies with the de jure decision-making powers as well as the European Central Bank within the Single Supervisory Mechanism have been supported with the establishment of Boards of Appeal, which count 9 entities. Like with the agencification phenomenon however, the establishment and characteristics of the Boards vary greatly from agency to agency without clear indications as to why the differences (should) exist and what exact role and how much discretion (should) be given to the Boards. As this unclarities put the legitimacy of the system of controls of EU agencies under pressure, an attempt to build a common system of review of agency action by the Boards seems desirable. To contribute to this ultimate goal of our study, this chapter offers a historical overview of agencification and review of agency action in the EU, rationales behind the creation of agencies’ appeal bodies and an attempt of classification of different boards to enhance comprehension and development of a common system of review of agency action. For learning purposes, we look at the system of administrative review in the US. We base our analysis on relevant secondary legislation, such as agencies’ founding acts, rules of procedure, case-law in the EU and in the US and relevant academic literature.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evans, Antony M.; Rosenbusch, Hannes; Zeelenberg, Marcel;
    Country: Netherlands

    Prosociality (measured with economic games) is correlated with individual differences in psychological constructs (measured with self-report scales). We review how methods from natural language processing, a subfield of computer science focused on processing natural text, can be applied to understand the semantic content of scales measuring psychological constructs correlated with prosociality. Methods for clustering language and assessing similarity between text documents can be used to assess the novelty (or redundancy) of new scales, to understand the overlap among different psychological constructs, and to compare different measures of the same construct. These examples illustrate how natural language processing methods can augment traditional survey- and game-based approaches to studying individual differences in prosociality.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sarti, Gabriele; Nissim, Malvina;
    Publisher: arXiv
    Country: Netherlands

    The T5 model and its unified text-to-text paradigm contributed in advancing the state-of-the-art for many natural language processing tasks. While some multilingual variants of the T5 model have recently been introduced, their performances were found to provide suboptimal performances for languages other than English if compared to monolingual variants. We are motivated by these findings to introduce IT5, the first family of encoder-decoder transformer models pretrained specifically on Italian. We perform a thorough cleaning of a web-crawled Italian corpus including more than 40 billion words and use it to pretrain three IT5 models of different sizes. The performance of IT5 models and their multilingual counterparts is then evaluated on a broad range of natural language understanding and generation benchmarks for Italian. We find the monolingual IT5 models to provide the best scale-to-performance ratio across tested models, consistently outperforming their multilingual counterparts and setting a new state-of-the-art for most Italian conditional language generation tasks.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hollander, Hella; Wright, Holly; Geser, Guntram; Ronzino, Paola; Bassett, Sheena; Massara, Flavia; Doorn, P.K.;
    Publisher: ARIADNEplus
    Country: Netherlands

    This interim report, “Policies and Good Practices for FAIR Data Management” describes the activities carried out by the different partners during the first 2 and a half years of the ARIADNEplus project, as well as the results achieved through the work package on the following topics: • Support the creation of FAIR data in the archaeological sector • Define and spread guidelines to good practices in archaeological data management • Adapt standard quality criteria for datasets and data to the archaeological case, and support their implementation among users.

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