Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
10 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • Research data
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Dataset
  • AR
  • ZENODO

Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    D. E. Gutiérrez Gregoric; E. D. Daglio; M. de Lucía; D. G. Robinson; G. Darrigran;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Argentina

    Commercial plant nurseries may serve as causes of dispersal of land snails and slugs (native and non-native) through the trade of plants and the related transport of eggs and small individuals that may pass unnoticed. Studies on the possible role of plant nurseries as a potential cause of dispersal of slugs in South America are lacking. To explore the role of garden centers, we collected and identified slugs in 12 commercial nurseries in two cities in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Eight species of slugs were found. Based on our findings we validate the existence of Deroceras laeve and Belocaulus angustipes for Argentina and confirm the existence of Ambigolimax valentianus, which was recently cited for Argentina. We recommend that plant nurseries be regularly monitored given that snail and slug species are accidentally spread through trade in plants. {"references": ["Guti\u00e9rrez Gregoric, D. E., Daglio, E. D., de Luc\u00eda, M., Robinson, D. G., Darrigran, G., 2020. Land slugs in plant nurseries, a potential cause of dispersal in Argentina. Arxius de Miscel\u2022l\u00e0nia Zool\u00f2gica, 18, https://doi.org/10.32800/amz.2020.18.0173"]} Dataset: Taxonomic information, collection lots for each species deposited in the Malacological Collection of La Plata Museum, number of individuals per lot deposited, coordinates of the nurseries, and date of collection.

  • Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Carignano, Ana Paula; Carignano, Ana; Echevarría, Javier; Zavattieri, Ana;
    Country: Argentina

    Several hundreds of carapaces and a few valves were picked under a Nikon SMZ645 stereomicroscope from a single sample. Selected specimens were mounted on stubs using carbon conductive adhesive tape, gold coated and scanned with a JEOL JSM-6360LV Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at the Servicio de Microscopía Electrónica del Museo de La Plata, La Plata city, Argentina. After examination under SEM, a total of 167 specimens were retained for study regarding their preservation, mainly those with undeformed dorsal and/or lateral outlines. Length, height, and width for carapaces were measured on SEM images. A geometric morphometric analysis, following the procedures outlined by Zelditch et al. (2004), was performed on the SEM photographs on both dorsal and lateral left views of the carapaces. For the dorsal view, two landmarks were established: 1) the anterior most and 2) the posterior most points of valves contact. The outline for each valve was characterized by a 100 points curve including both landmarks. The anterior most point of the carapace was defined as initial point for the outline on lateral view of the carapace, which was characterized by 200 points. Data was standardized for position, size and rotational differences by means of a generalized least squares Procrustes superposition (Zelditch et al. 2004, p. 113–119). Logarithm with base 10 of Centroid Size—log(CS)—was used as size estimator for all the analyses that required it (Zelditch et al. 2004, p. 78). Digitization of the landmark configurations was performed on TPSdig2.12 (Rohlf 2008), and a Procrustes superposition was done for each data set with CoordGen6h (Sheets 2001). Procrustes coordinates were used as data for a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using the software PAST 3.23 (Hammer et al. 2001). HAMMER, Ø., HARPER, D. A. T. and RYAN, P. D. 2001. PAST: Paleontological Statistics software package for education and data analysis. Palaeontologia Electronica, 4, 1–9. ROHLF, F. J. 2008. tpsDig2. http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/morph/ SHEETS, H. D.2001. IMP: integrated morphometrics package. Department of Physics, Canisius College, Buffalo, N.Y. - http://www3.canisius.edu/~sheets/morphsoft.html - http://www3.canisius.edu/~sheets/moremorph.html ZELDITCH, M. L., SWIDERSKI, D. L., SHEETS, H. D. and FINK, W. L. 2004. Geometric Morphometrics for Biologists: a Primer. Elsevier Academic Press, Amsterdam, 443 pp. The Darwinulocopina comprise an interest group of ostracods which where among the first invaders of freshwater waters during the late Palaeozoic. The Permian–Triassic extinction greatly reduced their diversity, reaching present times represented by one family. The darwinulids are regarded as “ancient asexuals” since a parthenogenetic mode of reproduction is assumed for all the post-Triassic members of the group. However, the high diversity achieved during the late Palaeozoic is often associated with sexual reproduction. Here we studied a monospecific association of ostracods from the Middle Triassic of the Cuyana Basin, Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and recognized a new species of Darwinulocopina, Prasuchonella? huarpe nov. sp. We discuss the traditional length/height and length/width graphical method to recognized ontogeny and/or sexual dimorphism in fossil ostracod assemblages, and performed a geometric morphometric analysis performed on both lateral and dorsal views of near one hundred seventy carapaces. The best results were obtained from the analysis in dorsal view, and four ontogenetic stages were discriminated (A-3, A-2, A-1 juveniles, adult). This allowed recognizing a main ontogenetic trend related to the development of the brooding chamber. Although subtle in differences, female carapaces are wider not only at the brooding chamber, but also along the whole length, compared to the carapaces of the presumptive males. Finally, full systematic descriptions and discussions, attempting to unify descriptive criteria for recent and fossil darwinulocopin carapaces, are provided. As a result, the need for a review of those Mesozoic records of Darwinulocopina, particularly those from the Triassic, is noted.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Landis, Doug; Knapp, Michal; Valladares, Graciela;
    Publisher: Dryad
    Country: Argentina

    Study sites Twelve landscape circles with varying amounts of soybean fields and forest fragments directly adjacent to soybean fields were selected. The center of each circle was located on a forest-soybean boundary. Forest cover was calculated at three scales (concentric circles of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 km diameter surrounding the focal fields). Sampling was carried out within the soybean fields at two distances, 10 m and 100 m from the forest edge. Arthropod sampling Natural enemies and herbivores on soybean fields were collected using two methods. Yellow pan traps were used collect parasitoids and flying herbivores and predators, while the beating-sheet method was used to sample foliage for caterpillars, stink bugs, and other predatory species. Two yellow plastic pan traps were placed on the ground between soybean rows (20 m from each other) at each site and distance from the forest at the end of soybean flowering. Beating-sheet sampling was repeated twice at two different soybean stages: flowering and pod filling. Soybean foliage was beaten against a 1 m long white vertical beating-sheet attached to a plastic trough. Thirty repetitions per distance and site were conducted at each stage. Repetitions were performed at ten sampling points, separated by 5 m. At each point, three soybean rows were sampled (central and adjacent rows). Data from all the repetitions was pooled to get one value per distance. For natural enemies we combined the information from both sampling methods and calculated total species richness of predators and parasitoids and abundance of predators and parasitoids of stink bugs and caterpillars per distance and field. Almost no soybean pests were collected with yellow pan traps and thus we used only data from beating sheet sampling to calculate herbivore richness and abundance of stink bugs and caterpillars. Pleasee see details on these methods on the article. Soybean herbivory and yield For measurements of herbivory, leaves from 10 soybean plants 5 m distant from each other (five leaves randomly selected, i.e. 50 leaves in total) per distance and site were collected. To estimate accumulated leaf consumption, leaves were collected prior to their senescence, at the beginning of the pod-filling stage (Fig. S1; R4-R5 phases; February 10-15). In the laboratory, digital photographs over a white background with a scale were taken. We used the software ImageJ (Schneider, Rasband, & Eliceiri, 2012) to measure leaf area and consumed area, and then calculated the proportion of consumed leaf. For leaves with damage along the edge, the shape of the leaf was digitally reconstructed based on the remaining leaflets or leaves of similar area. In order to measure soybean seed development and yield, 10 soybean plants (5 m distant from each other) were collected from each site and distance. Plants were collected at the end of the pod/filling stage, prior to harvest (Fig. S1; R8 phase; March 1-10), taken to the laboratory, and left to dry for 10 days at room conditions. We then measured the total number of pods per plant, the number of full pods (i.e. pods containing three or four seeds completely developed), and the total seed weight per plant. Non-crop habitats are essential for sustaining biodiversity of beneficial arthropods in agricultural landscapes, which can increase ecosystem services provision and crop yield. However, their effects on specific crop systems are less clear, such as soybean in South America, where the responses of pests and natural enemies to landscape structure have only recently been studied. Here, we analyzed how native forest fragments at local and landscape scales influenced arthropod communities, herbivory, and yield in soybean fields in central Argentina. To do this, we selected soybean fields located in agricultural landscapes with varying proportions of forest cover. At two distances (10 and 100m) from a focal forest fragment, we sampled natural enemy and herbivore arthropods, and measured soybean herbivory and yield. We focused on herbivore diversity, abundance of key soybean pests in the region (caterpillars and stink bugs), and their generalist and specialist natural enemies. Higher abundance of predators, lower herbivory rates, and increased yield were found near forests, while overall forest cover in the landscape was positively related with parasitoid and stink bug abundance, soybean yield, and negatively with herbivory. Moreover, yield was positively linked to richness and abundance of generalist and specialist enemies and independent of herbivory according to piecewise Structural Equation Models. Synthesis and applications. Our results show positive effects of native forests on biodiversity and yield in soybean crops, highlighting the need for conservation of forest fragments in agricultural landscapes. Moreover, the relation between natural enemies and crop yield suggests that Chaco forests support a diverse and abundant community of natural enemies that can provide sustained levels of ecosystem services and result in positive effects for farmers.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rovere, Alessio; Pappalardo, Marta; Richiano, Sebastian; Aguirre, Marina; Sandstrom, Michael R.; Hearty, Paul J.; Austermann, Jacqueline; Castellanos, Ignacio; Raymo, Maureen E.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Argentina

    The dataset consists of a spreadsheet containing data on GPS surveys, dynamic topography extracted from published models (gplates.org), Shell preservation scoring, Strontium Isotopic Stratigraphy ages, and Global mean Sea Level calculations. Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ferrero, Leticia V.; Cappa, Cristina E.; Saldaño, Hugo P.; Gómez, Mercedes; Rubio, Mónica; Günthardt, Guillermo;
    Publisher: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
    Country: Argentina

    We present reduced H2 and K near-infrared band images of HH 137, taken with the GSAOI+GeMS instrument of the Gemini South telescope. In addition, we provide submilimiter data in 12CO(3-2), 13CO(3-2), C18O(3-2), HCO+(3-2) and HCN(3-2) molecular lines of both HH 137 and HH 138, obtained with the SHeFI instrument of the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope. {"references": ["Ferrero et al. 2020"]} Accepted for publication in MNRAS

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gao, Shang; Rosales, Héctor Diego; Gómez Albarracín, Flavia Alejandra; Tsurkan, Vladimir; Kaur, Guratinder; Fenell, Tom; Steffens, Paul; Boehm, Martin; Čermák, Petr; Schneidewind, Astrid; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Argentina

    Data for: Fractional antiferromagnetic skyrmion lattice induced by anisotropic couplings. Instituto de Física de Líquidos y Sistemas Biológicos Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Facultad de Ingeniería

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Palacio, Facundo; Siepielski, Adam; Lacoretz, Mariela; Ordano, Mariano;
    Publisher: Dryad
    Country: Argentina

    Every organism on Earth must cope with a multitude of species interactions both directly and indirectly throughout its life cycle. However, how selection from multiple species occupying different trophic levels affects diffuse mutualisms has received little attention. As a result, how a given species amalgamates the combined effects of selection from multiple mutualists and antagonists to enhance its own fitness remains little understood. We investigated how multispecies interactions (frugivorous birds, ants, fruit flies, and parasitoid wasps) generate selection on fruit display traits in a seed dispersal mutualism. We used structural equation models to assess whether seed dispersers (frugivorous birds and ants) exerted phenotypic selection on fruit and seed traits in the Spiny Hackberry (Celtis ehrenbergiana), a fleshy-fruited tree, and how these selection regimes were influenced by fruit fly infestation and wasp parasitoidism levels. Birds exerted negative correlational selection on the combination of fruit crop size and mean seed weight, favoring either large crops with small seeds or small crops with large seeds. Parasitoids selected plants with higher fruit fly infestation levels, and fruit flies exerted positive directional selection on fruit size, which was positively correlated with seed weight. Therefore, higher parasitoidism indirectly correlated with higher plant fitness through increased bird fruit removal. In addition, ants exerted negative directional selection on mean seed weight. Our results show that strong selection on phenotypic traits may still arise in perceived diffuse species interactions. Overall, we emphasize the need to consider diverse direct and indirect partners to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms driving phenotypic trait evolution in multispecies interactions. Cafeteria experiment of ant fruit and seed removal See README file for a description of the content of all datafiles. Celtis_piecewiseSEM.csv Missing data are labeled as 'NA'. Selection exerted by birds and ants on Spiny Hackberry fruits, shaped by fruit fly infestation and parasitoidism See README file for a description of the content of all datafiles. Ant_removal_experiment.csv Missing data are labeled as 'NA'. Dataset used to analyze the ant fruit and seed removal experiment and to fit piecewise structural equation models

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hesse, Elze; O'Brien, Siobhan; Luján, Adela; Bayer, Florian; van Veen, Eleanor; Hodgson, Dave; Buckling, Angus;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Argentina

    The R code (Hesse_etal.R) descibes step by step how metal polution affects the ecology and evolution of a community-wide public good – the production of metal-detoxifying siderophores. This code accompanies the manuscript "Interspecific interactions shape public goods production in natural microbial communities" (https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/710715v1) Fil: Hesse, Elze. University Exeter; United Kingdom. Fil: O'Brien, Siobhan. University of Liverpool; United Kingdom. Fil: Luján, Adela. Universidad Católica de Córdoba; Argentina. Fil: Luján, Adela. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Investigaciones en Recursos Naturales y Sustentabilidad José Sánchez Labrador S.J.; Argentina. Fil: Bayer, Florian. University Exeter; United Kingdom. Fil: van Veen, Eleanor. University Exeter; United Kingdom. Fil: Hodgson, Dave. University Exeter; United Kingdom. Fil: Buckling, Angus. University Exeter; United Kingdom.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Presslee, Samantha; Slater, Graham J.; Pujos, Francois; Forasiepi, Analia M.; Fischer, Roman; Molloy, Kelly; Mackie, Meaghan; Olsen, Jesper V.; Kramarz, Alejandro; Taglioretti, Matias; +16 more
    Country: Argentina

    protein_data_MrBayesNexus file containing collagen alignments for extinct and extant xenarthrans. Also includes MrBayes block with specifications for running Bayesian topology searchcombined_data_MrBayesalignment in nexus format containing collagen protein sequences and mitochondrial genomes as available for living and extinct xenarthrans. Also includes MrBayes block.protein_mtDNA_morphology_sloths_MRBnexus file containing protein and mtDNA data plus the morphological character dataset from Varela et al., 2019.BEAST_protein_Xenarthraxml file to run BEAST under fossilized birth death process with xenarthran proteomic dataBEAST_combined_data_bradypus_constraintxml file to run beast with combined proteomic and mitochondrial genome data. Note that this file enforces a monophyly constraint on Bradypus, which can be removed by commenting out the associated lines of the xmlprotein_only_xenarthra_beastmaximum clade crediibility chronogram from analysis of xenarthran proteomic datacombined_protein_mtDNA_xenarthra_bradypus_constraint_beastmaximum clade credibility chronogram from beast analysis of xenarthran proteomic and mitochondrial genome data. The living tree sloths Choloepus and Bradypus are the only remaining members of Folivora, a major xenarthran radiation that occupied a wide range of habitats in many parts of the western hemisphere during the Cenozoic, including both continents and the West Indies. Ancient DNA evidence has played only a minor role in folivoran systematics, as most sloths lived in places not conducive to genomic preservation. Here we utilize collagen sequence information, both separately and in combination with published mitochondrial DNA evidence, to assess the relationships of tree sloths and their extinct relatives. Results from phylogenetic analysis of these datasets differ substantially from morphology-based concepts: Choloepus groups with Mylodontidae, not Megalonychidae; Bradypus and Megalonyx pair together as megatherioids, while monophyletic Antillean sloths may be sister to all other folivorans. Divergence estimates are consistent with fossil evidence for mid-Cenozoic presence of sloths in the West Indies and an early Miocene radiation in South America.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sun, Jin; Mu, Huawei; Ip, Jack C. H.; Li, Runsheng; Xu, Ting; Accorsi, Alice; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez; Ross, Eric; Lan, Yi; Sun, Yanan; +11 more
    Publisher: Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS)
    Country: Argentina

    The family Ampullariidae includes both aquatic and amphibious apple snails. They are an emerging model for evolutionary studies due to the high diversity, ancient history and wide geographical distribution. Insight into drivers of ampullariid evolution is hampered, however, by the lack of genomic resources. Here we report the genomes of four ampullariids spanning the Old World (Lanistes nyassanus) and New World (Pomacea canaliculata, Pomacea maculata and Marisa cornuarietis) clades. The ampullariid genomes have conserved ancient bilaterial karyotype features and a novel Hox gene cluster rearrangement, making them valuable in comparative genomic studies. They have expanded gene families related to environmental sensing and cellulose digestion, which may have facilitated some ampullarids to become notorious invasive pests. In the amphibious Pomacea, novel acquision of an egg neurotoxin and a protein for making the calcareous eggshell may have been key adaptations enabling their transition from underwater to terrestrial egg deposition. Marisa cornuarietis genome v2.0Assembled genome and annotation (GFF, transcripts and protein sequence)Marisa_cornuarietis_genome_v2.0.zipLanistes nyassanus genome_v1.0Assembled genome and annotation (GFF, transcripts and protein sequence)Lanistes_nyassanus_genome_v1.0.zipPomacea maculata genome_v1.0Assembled genome and annotation (GFF, transcripts and protein sequence)Pomacea_maculata_genome_v1.0.zipPomacea canaliculata genome_v1.5Assembled genome and annotation (GFF, transcripts and protein sequence)Pomacea_canaliculata_genome_v1.5.zip

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
10 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    D. E. Gutiérrez Gregoric; E. D. Daglio; M. de Lucía; D. G. Robinson; G. Darrigran;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Argentina

    Commercial plant nurseries may serve as causes of dispersal of land snails and slugs (native and non-native) through the trade of plants and the related transport of eggs and small individuals that may pass unnoticed. Studies on the possible role of plant nurseries as a potential cause of dispersal of slugs in South America are lacking. To explore the role of garden centers, we collected and identified slugs in 12 commercial nurseries in two cities in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Eight species of slugs were found. Based on our findings we validate the existence of Deroceras laeve and Belocaulus angustipes for Argentina and confirm the existence of Ambigolimax valentianus, which was recently cited for Argentina. We recommend that plant nurseries be regularly monitored given that snail and slug species are accidentally spread through trade in plants. {"references": ["Guti\u00e9rrez Gregoric, D. E., Daglio, E. D., de Luc\u00eda, M., Robinson, D. G., Darrigran, G., 2020. Land slugs in plant nurseries, a potential cause of dispersal in Argentina. Arxius de Miscel\u2022l\u00e0nia Zool\u00f2gica, 18, https://doi.org/10.32800/amz.2020.18.0173"]} Dataset: Taxonomic information, collection lots for each species deposited in the Malacological Collection of La Plata Museum, number of individuals per lot deposited, coordinates of the nurseries, and date of collection.

  • Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Carignano, Ana Paula; Carignano, Ana; Echevarría, Javier; Zavattieri, Ana;
    Country: Argentina

    Several hundreds of carapaces and a few valves were picked under a Nikon SMZ645 stereomicroscope from a single sample. Selected specimens were mounted on stubs using carbon conductive adhesive tape, gold coated and scanned with a JEOL JSM-6360LV Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at the Servicio de Microscopía Electrónica del Museo de La Plata, La Plata city, Argentina. After examination under SEM, a total of 167 specimens were retained for study regarding their preservation, mainly those with undeformed dorsal and/or lateral outlines. Length, height, and width for carapaces were measured on SEM images. A geometric morphometric analysis, following the procedures outlined by Zelditch et al. (2004), was performed on the SEM photographs on both dorsal and lateral left views of the carapaces. For the dorsal view, two landmarks were established: 1) the anterior most and 2) the posterior most points of valves contact. The outline for each valve was characterized by a 100 points curve including both landmarks. The anterior most point of the carapace was defined as initial point for the outline on lateral view of the carapace, which was characterized by 200 points. Data was standardized for position, size and rotational differences by means of a generalized least squares Procrustes superposition (Zelditch et al. 2004, p. 113–119). Logarithm with base 10 of Centroid Size—log(CS)—was used as size estimator for all the analyses that required it (Zelditch et al. 2004, p. 78). Digitization of the landmark configurations was performed on TPSdig2.12 (Rohlf 2008), and a Procrustes superposition was done for each data set with CoordGen6h (Sheets 2001). Procrustes coordinates were used as data for a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using the software PAST 3.23 (Hammer et al. 2001). HAMMER, Ø., HARPER, D. A. T. and RYAN, P. D. 2001. PAST: Paleontological Statistics software package for education and data analysis. Palaeontologia Electronica, 4, 1–9. ROHLF, F. J. 2008. tpsDig2. http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/morph/ SHEETS, H. D.2001. IMP: integrated morphometrics package. Department of Physics, Canisius College, Buffalo, N.Y. - http://www3.canisius.edu/~sheets/morphsoft.html - http://www3.canisius.edu/~sheets/moremorph.html ZELDITCH, M. L., SWIDERSKI, D. L., SHEETS, H. D. and FINK, W. L. 2004. Geometric Morphometrics for Biologists: a Primer. Elsevier Academic Press, Amsterdam, 443 pp. The Darwinulocopina comprise an interest group of ostracods which where among the first invaders of freshwater waters during the late Palaeozoic. The Permian–Triassic extinction greatly reduced their diversity, reaching present times represented by one family. The darwinulids are regarded as “ancient asexuals” since a parthenogenetic mode of reproduction is assumed for all the post-Triassic members of the group. However, the high diversity achieved during the late Palaeozoic is often associated with sexual reproduction. Here we studied a monospecific association of ostracods from the Middle Triassic of the Cuyana Basin, Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and recognized a new species of Darwinulocopina, Prasuchonella? huarpe nov. sp. We discuss the traditional length/height and length/width graphical method to recognized ontogeny and/or sexual dimorphism in fossil ostracod assemblages, and performed a geometric morphometric analysis performed on both lateral and dorsal views of near one hundred seventy carapaces. The best results were obtained from the analysis in dorsal view, and four ontogenetic stages were discriminated (A-3, A-2, A-1 juveniles, adult). This allowed recognizing a main ontogenetic trend related to the development of the brooding chamber. Although subtle in differences, female carapaces are wider not only at the brooding chamber, but also along the whole length, compared to the carapaces of the presumptive males. Finally, full systematic descriptions and discussions, attempting to unify descriptive criteria for recent and fossil darwinulocopin carapaces, are provided. As a result, the need for a review of those Mesozoic records of Darwinulocopina, particularly those from the Triassic, is noted.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gonzalez, Ezequiel; Landis, Doug; Knapp, Michal; Valladares, Graciela;
    Publisher: Dryad
    Country: Argentina

    Study sites Twelve landscape circles with varying amounts of soybean fields and forest fragments directly adjacent to soybean fields were selected. The center of each circle was located on a forest-soybean boundary. Forest cover was calculated at three scales (concentric circles of 0.5, 1, and 1.5 km diameter surrounding the focal fields). Sampling was carried out within the soybean fields at two distances, 10 m and 100 m from the forest edge. Arthropod sampling Natural enemies and herbivores on soybean fields were collected using two methods. Yellow pan traps were used collect parasitoids and flying herbivores and predators, while the beating-sheet method was used to sample foliage for caterpillars, stink bugs, and other predatory species. Two yellow plastic pan traps were placed on the ground between soybean rows (20 m from each other) at each site and distance from the forest at the end of soybean flowering. Beating-sheet sampling was repeated twice at two different soybean stages: flowering and pod filling. Soybean foliage was beaten against a 1 m long white vertical beating-sheet attached to a plastic trough. Thirty repetitions per distance and site were conducted at each stage. Repetitions were performed at ten sampling points, separated by 5 m. At each point, three soybean rows were sampled (central and adjacent rows). Data from all the repetitions was pooled to get one value per distance. For natural enemies we combined the information from both sampling methods and calculated total species richness of predators and parasitoids and abundance of predators and parasitoids of stink bugs and caterpillars per distance and field. Almost no soybean pests were collected with yellow pan traps and thus we used only data from beating sheet sampling to calculate herbivore richness and abundance of stink bugs and caterpillars. Pleasee see details on these methods on the article. Soybean herbivory and yield For measurements of herbivory, leaves from 10 soybean plants 5 m distant from each other (five leaves randomly selected, i.e. 50 leaves in total) per distance and site were collected. To estimate accumulated leaf consumption, leaves were collected prior to their senescence, at the beginning of the pod-filling stage (Fig. S1; R4-R5 phases; February 10-15). In the laboratory, digital photographs over a white background with a scale were taken. We used the software ImageJ (Schneider, Rasband, & Eliceiri, 2012) to measure leaf area and consumed area, and then calculated the proportion of consumed leaf. For leaves with damage along the edge, the shape of the leaf was digitally reconstructed based on the remaining leaflets or leaves of similar area. In order to measure soybean seed development and yield, 10 soybean plants (5 m distant from each other) were collected from each site and distance. Plants were collected at the end of the pod/filling stage, prior to harvest (Fig. S1; R8 phase; March 1-10), taken to the laboratory, and left to dry for 10 days at room conditions. We then measured the total number of pods per plant, the number of full pods (i.e. pods containing three or four seeds completely developed), and the total seed weight per plant. Non-crop habitats are essential for sustaining biodiversity of beneficial arthropods in agricultural landscapes, which can increase ecosystem services provision and crop yield. However, their effects on specific crop systems are less clear, such as soybean in South America, where the responses of pests and natural enemies to landscape structure have only recently been studied. Here, we analyzed how native forest fragments at local and landscape scales influenced arthropod communities, herbivory, and yield in soybean fields in central Argentina. To do this, we selected soybean fields located in agricultural landscapes with varying proportions of forest cover. At two distances (10 and 100m) from a focal forest fragment, we sampled natural enemy and herbivore arthropods, and measured soybean herbivory and yield. We focused on herbivore diversity, abundance of key soybean pests in the region (caterpillars and stink bugs), and their generalist and specialist natural enemies. Higher abundance of predators, lower herbivory rates, and increased yield were found near forests, while overall forest cover in the landscape was positively related with parasitoid and stink bug abundance, soybean yield, and negatively with herbivory. Moreover, yield was positively linked to richness and abundance of generalist and specialist enemies and independent of herbivory according to piecewise Structural Equation Models. Synthesis and applications. Our results show positive effects of native forests on biodiversity and yield in soybean crops, highlighting the need for conservation of forest fragments in agricultural landscapes. Moreover, the relation between natural enemies and crop yield suggests that Chaco forests support a diverse and abundant community of natural enemies that can provide sustained levels of ecosystem services and result in positive effects for farmers.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Rovere, Alessio; Pappalardo, Marta; Richiano, Sebastian; Aguirre, Marina; Sandstrom, Michael R.; Hearty, Paul J.; Austermann, Jacqueline; Castellanos, Ignacio; Raymo, Maureen E.;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Argentina

    The dataset consists of a spreadsheet containing data on GPS surveys, dynamic topography extracted from published models (gplates.org), Shell preservation scoring, Strontium Isotopic Stratigraphy ages, and Global mean Sea Level calculations. Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ferrero, Leticia V.; Cappa, Cristina E.; Saldaño, Hugo P.; Gómez, Mercedes; Rubio, Mónica; Günthardt, Guillermo;
    Publisher: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
    Country: Argentina

    We present reduced H2 and K near-infrared band images of HH 137, taken with the GSAOI+GeMS instrument of the Gemini South telescope. In addition, we provide submilimiter data in 12CO(3-2), 13CO(3-2), C18O(3-2), HCO+(3-2) and HCN(3-2) molecular lines of both HH 137 and HH 138, obtained with the SHeFI instrument of the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) telescope. {"references": ["Ferrero et al. 2020"]} Accepted for publication in MNRAS

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gao, Shang; Rosales, Héctor Diego; Gómez Albarracín, Flavia Alejandra; Tsurkan, Vladimir; Kaur, Guratinder; Fenell, Tom; Steffens, Paul; Boehm, Martin; Čermák, Petr; Schneidewind, Astrid; +4 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Argentina

    Data for: Fractional antiferromagnetic skyrmion lattice induced by anisotropic couplings. Instituto de Física de Líquidos y Sistemas Biológicos Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Facultad de Ingeniería

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Palacio, Facundo; Siepielski, Adam; Lacoretz, Mariela; Ordano, Mariano;
    Publisher: Dryad
    Country: Argentina

    Every organism on Earth must cope with a multitude of species interactions both directly and indirectly throughout its life cycle. However, how selection from multiple species occupying different trophic levels affects diffuse mutualisms has received little attention. As a result, how a given species amalgamates the combined effects of selection from multiple mutualists and antagonists to enhance its own fitness remains little understood. We investigated how multispecies interactions (frugivorous birds, ants, fruit flies, and parasitoid wasps) generate selection on fruit display traits in a seed dispersal mutualism. We used structural equation models to assess whether seed dispersers (frugivorous birds and ants) exerted phenotypic selection on fruit and seed traits in the Spiny Hackberry (Celtis ehrenbergiana), a fleshy-fruited tree, and how these selection regimes were influenced by fruit fly infestation and wasp parasitoidism levels. Birds exerted negative correlational selection on the combination of fruit crop size and mean seed weight, favoring either large crops with small seeds or small crops with large seeds. Parasitoids selected plants with higher fruit fly infestation levels, and fruit flies exerted positive directional selection on fruit size, which was positively correlated with seed weight. Therefore, higher parasitoidism indirectly correlated with higher plant fitness through increased bird fruit removal. In addition, ants exerted negative directional selection on mean seed weight. Our results show that strong selection on phenotypic traits may still arise in perceived diffuse species interactions. Overall, we emphasize the need to consider diverse direct and indirect partners to achieve a better understanding of the mechanisms driving phenotypic trait evolution in multispecies interactions. Cafeteria experiment of ant fruit and seed removal See README file for a description of the content of all datafiles. Celtis_piecewiseSEM.csv Missing data are labeled as 'NA'. Selection exerted by birds and ants on Spiny Hackberry fruits, shaped by fruit fly infestation and parasitoidism See README file for a description of the content of all datafiles. Ant_removal_experiment.csv Missing data are labeled as 'NA'. Dataset used to analyze the ant fruit and seed removal experiment and to fit piecewise structural equation models

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hesse, Elze; O'Brien, Siobhan; Luján, Adela; Bayer, Florian; van Veen, Eleanor; Hodgson, Dave; Buckling, Angus;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Argentina

    The R code (Hesse_etal.R) descibes step by step how metal polution affects the ecology and evolution of a community-wide public good – the production of metal-detoxifying siderophores. This code accompanies the manuscript "Interspecific interactions shape public goods production in natural microbial communities" (https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/710715v1) Fil: Hesse, Elze. University Exeter; United Kingdom. Fil: O'Brien, Siobhan. University of Liverpool; United Kingdom. Fil: Luján, Adela. Universidad Católica de Córdoba; Argentina. Fil: Luján, Adela. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Instituto de Investigaciones en Recursos Naturales y Sustentabilidad José Sánchez Labrador S.J.; Argentina. Fil: Bayer, Florian. University Exeter; United Kingdom. Fil: van Veen, Eleanor. University Exeter; United Kingdom. Fil: Hodgson, Dave. University Exeter; United Kingdom. Fil: Buckling, Angus. University Exeter; United Kingdom.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Presslee, Samantha; Slater, Graham J.; Pujos, Francois; Forasiepi, Analia M.; Fischer, Roman; Molloy, Kelly; Mackie, Meaghan; Olsen, Jesper V.; Kramarz, Alejandro; Taglioretti, Matias; +16 more
    Country: Argentina

    protein_data_MrBayesNexus file containing collagen alignments for extinct and extant xenarthrans. Also includes MrBayes block with specifications for running Bayesian topology searchcombined_data_MrBayesalignment in nexus format containing collagen protein sequences and mitochondrial genomes as available for living and extinct xenarthrans. Also includes MrBayes block.protein_mtDNA_morphology_sloths_MRBnexus file containing protein and mtDNA data plus the morphological character dataset from Varela et al., 2019.BEAST_protein_Xenarthraxml file to run BEAST under fossilized birth death process with xenarthran proteomic dataBEAST_combined_data_bradypus_constraintxml file to run beast with combined proteomic and mitochondrial genome data. Note that this file enforces a monophyly constraint on Bradypus, which can be removed by commenting out the associated lines of the xmlprotein_only_xenarthra_beastmaximum clade crediibility chronogram from analysis of xenarthran proteomic datacombined_protein_mtDNA_xenarthra_bradypus_constraint_beastmaximum clade credibility chronogram from beast analysis of xenarthran proteomic and mitochondrial genome data. The living tree sloths Choloepus and Bradypus are the only remaining members of Folivora, a major xenarthran radiation that occupied a wide range of habitats in many parts of the western hemisphere during the Cenozoic, including both continents and the West Indies. Ancient DNA evidence has played only a minor role in folivoran systematics, as most sloths lived in places not conducive to genomic preservation. Here we utilize collagen sequence information, both separately and in combination with published mitochondrial DNA evidence, to assess the relationships of tree sloths and their extinct relatives. Results from phylogenetic analysis of these datasets differ substantially from morphology-based concepts: Choloepus groups with Mylodontidae, not Megalonychidae; Bradypus and Megalonyx pair together as megatherioids, while monophyletic Antillean sloths may be sister to all other folivorans. Divergence estimates are consistent with fossil evidence for mid-Cenozoic presence of sloths in the West Indies and an early Miocene radiation in South America.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sun, Jin; Mu, Huawei; Ip, Jack C. H.; Li, Runsheng; Xu, Ting; Accorsi, Alice; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez; Ross, Eric; Lan, Yi; Sun, Yanan; +11 more
    Publisher: Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS)
    Country: Argentina

    The family Ampullariidae includes both aquatic and amphibious apple snails. They are an emerging model for evolutionary studies due to the high diversity, ancient history and wide geographical distribution. Insight into drivers of ampullariid evolution is hampered, however, by the lack of genomic resources. Here we report the genomes of four ampullariids spanning the Old World (Lanistes nyassanus) and New World (Pomacea canaliculata, Pomacea maculata and Marisa cornuarietis) clades. The ampullariid genomes have conserved ancient bilaterial karyotype features and a novel Hox gene cluster rearrangement, making them valuable in comparative genomic studies. They have expanded gene families related to environmental sensing and cellulose digestion, which may have facilitated some ampullarids to become notorious invasive pests. In the amphibious Pomacea, novel acquision of an egg neurotoxin and a protein for making the calcareous eggshell may have been key adaptations enabling their transition from underwater to terrestrial egg deposition. Marisa cornuarietis genome v2.0Assembled genome and annotation (GFF, transcripts and protein sequence)Marisa_cornuarietis_genome_v2.0.zipLanistes nyassanus genome_v1.0Assembled genome and annotation (GFF, transcripts and protein sequence)Lanistes_nyassanus_genome_v1.0.zipPomacea maculata genome_v1.0Assembled genome and annotation (GFF, transcripts and protein sequence)Pomacea_maculata_genome_v1.0.zipPomacea canaliculata genome_v1.5Assembled genome and annotation (GFF, transcripts and protein sequence)Pomacea_canaliculata_genome_v1.5.zip

Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.