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  • Recolector de Ciencia Abierta, RECOLECTA
  • Diposit Digital de Documents de la UAB
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Amadeo Sena-Torralba; Ruslan Álvarez-Diduk; Claudio Parolo; Andrew Piper; Arben Merkoçi;
    Publisher: American Chemical Society
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | MICROB-PREDICT (825694), EC | PREMOTHER (795635), EC | GrapheneCore3 (881603)

    We acknowledge financial support to the project AC21_2/ 00044 (GLEBIOASSAY), funded by Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) and cofunded by the European Union, MICROBPREDICT project (European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement 825694), and Graphene Flagship Core 3 (European Union Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement 881603). ICN2 is funded by CERCA programme, Generalitat de Catalunya. Grant SEV-2017-0706 is funded by MCIN/ AEI/10.13039/501100011033. The authors also acknowledge the Project PID2021-124795NB-I00 funded by MCIN/AEI/ 10.13039/501100011033/and FEDER Una manera de hacer Europa and the project PAPYRUS: Grant PLEC2021-007972 funded by MCIN/AEI/10.13039/501100011033 and by the “European Union NextGenerationEU/PRTR”. The authors acknowledge Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) for the project “COVID19-122” granted in the call “Nuevas ayudas extraordinarias a proyectos de investigación en el marco de las medidas urgentes extraordinarias para hacer frente al impacto económico y social del COVID-19” (Ayudas CSIC-COVID-19). A.S.-T. acknowledges MINECO for the Juan de la Cierva Formación fellowship (FJC2020-043927-I). C.P. acknowledges the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Individual Fellowship; this project received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement 795635. C.P. (ISGlobal) also acknowledges support from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation** and State Research Agency through the “Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa 2019−2023” Program (CEX2018-000806-S). Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are currently the most used point-of-care sensors for both diagnostic (e.g., pregnancy test, COVID-19 monitoring) and environmental (e.g., pesticides and bacterial monitoring) applications. Although the core of LFA technology was developed several decades ago, in recent years the integration of novel nanomaterials as signal transducers or receptor immobilization platforms has brought improved analytical capabilities. In this Review, we present how nanomaterial-based LFAs can address the inherent challenges of point-of-care (PoC) diagnostics such as sensitivity enhancement, lowering of detection limits, multiplexing, and quantification of analytes in complex samples. Specifically, we highlight the strategies that can synergistically solve the limitations of current LFAs and that have proven commercial feasibility. Finally, we discuss the barriers toward commercialization and the next generation of LFAs. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nigeer Te; Jordi Rodon; Rhea Creve; Mónica Pérez; Joaquim Segalés; Júlia Vergara-Alert; Albert Bensaid;
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | VetBioNet (731014)

    AbstractMiddle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) poses a serious threat to public health. Here, we established an ex vivo alpaca tracheal explant (ATE) model using an air-liquid interface culture system to gain insights into MERS-CoV infection in the camelid lower respiratory tract. ATE can be infected by MERS-CoV, being 103 TCID50/mL the minimum viral dosage required to establish a productive infection. IFNs and antiviral ISGs were not induced in ATE cultures in response to MERS-CoV infection, strongly suggesting that ISGs expression observed in vivo is rather a consequence of the IFN induction occurring in the nasal mucosa of camelids.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jaume Alijotas‐Reig; Victor García‐GImenez; Peter J. Velthuis; Frank B. Niessen; Tom S. Decates;
    Countries: Netherlands, Spain, Netherlands

    COVID-19; Inflammation; Soft tissue fillers COVID-19; Inflamación; Rellenos de tejidos blandos COVID-19; Inflamació; Farciments de teixits tous Background Adverse events (AE) after COVID-19 vaccines, particularly, but not solely, with those messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccines, have rarely been reported in patients previously treated with dermal fillers (DF). Objective To evaluate the morphology, clinical characteristics, the timing of presentation, and outcomes of inflammatory AE appeared in patients injected with DF, after anti-COVID-19 vaccination. Methods Descriptive study of a case series of 20 consecutive patients collected after the occurrence of AE in previously filled areas post COVID-19 vaccination. Results From January 2021 to July 2021, we analyzed 20 AE reactions triggered by COVID-19 vaccines in the previously mentioned cohort. They were vaccinated with Pfizer/Biontech (11; 55%), Moderna (5; 25%), Astra-Zeneca (3; 15%), and Sputnik (1; 5%). The most common manifestations were oedema/swelling, angioedema, erythema, skin induration, and granuloma. Less common reactions included myalgia and lymphadenopathy. In 13/20 (65%) cases, the AE appeared after the first dose of vaccine. These inflammatory AE appeared more rapidly after the second dose than after the first one. In 13/20 (65%) cases, the symptomatology subsided with anti-inflammatory/antihistaminic drugs, while spontaneously in 3/20 (15%). The manifestations are ongoing.in the remaining four cases (20%). Conclusion Although probably rare, both RNA-based and adenovirus-based anti-COVID-19 vaccines can cause inflammatory bouts in patients previously treated with DF. In these cases, caution should be paid on subsequent vaccine doses, considering a tailored risk/benefit for any case before next vaccination.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Liming Hu; Enric Calucho; Celia Fuentes-Chust; Claudio Parolo; Andrea Idili; Ruslan Álvarez-Diduk; Lourdes Rivas; Arben Merkoçi;
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | MICROB-PREDICT (825694), EC | PROBIST (754510), EC | GrapheneCore3 (881603)

    We acknowledge Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) for the project “COVID19-122” granted in the call “Nuevas ayudas extraordinarias a proyectos de investigación en el marco de las medidas urgentes extraordinarias para hacer frente al impacto económico y social del COVID-19 (Ayudas CSIC-COVID-19)”. We acknowledge also the MICROB-PREDICT project that has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 825694. Financial support from the EU Graphene Flagship Core 3 Project (No. 881603) is also acknowledged. This article reflects only the authors' view, and the European Commission is not responsible for any use that may be made of the information it contains. ICN2 is funded by the CERCA programme/Generalitat de Catalunya. ICN2 is supported by the Severo Ochoa Centres of Excellence programme, funded by the Spanish Research Agency (AEI, grant no. SEV-2017-0706). E. C. acknowledges Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación of Spain and Fondo Social Europeo for the Fellowship PRE2018-084856 awarded under the call ‘Ayudas para contratos predoctorales para la formación de doctores, Subprograma Estatal de Formación del Programa Estatal de Promoción del Talento y su Empleabilidad en I+D+i’, under the framework of ‘Plan Estatal de Investigación Científica y Técnica y de Innovación 2017–2020’. L. H. acknowledges the China Scholarship Council. L. H., E. C. and C. F.-C. acknowledge the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) for their support. C. P. (ISGlobal) also acknowledges support from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation and State Research Agency through the “Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa 2019–2023” Program (CEX2018-000806-S), and support from the Generalitat de Catalunya through the CERCA Program. A. I. was supported by a PROBIST postdoctoral fellowship funded by the European Research Council (Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 754510). This manuscript aims at raising the attention of the scientific community to the need for better characterised bioreceptors for fast development of point-of-care diagnostic devices able to support mass frequency testing. Particularly, we present the difficulties encountered in finding suitable antibodies for the development of a lateral flow assay for detecting the nucleoprotein of SARS-CoV-2. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Janet Delgado; Alicia de Manuel; Iris Parra; Cristian Moyano; Jon Rueda; Ariel Gueresenzvaig; Txetxu Ausín; Maite Cruz; David Casacuberta; Angel Puyol;
    Publisher: Research Square
    Country: Spain

    To analyze which ethically relevant biases have been identified by academic literature in artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms developed either for patient risk prediction and triage, or for contact tracing to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, to specifically investigate whether the role of social determinants of health (SDOH) have been considered in these AI developments or not. We conducted a scoping review of the literature, which covered publications from March 2020 to April 2021. ​Studies mentioning biases on AI algorithms developed for contact tracing and medical triage or risk prediction regarding COVID-19 were included. From 1054 identified articles, 20 studies were finally included. We propose a typology of biases identified in the literature based on bias, limitations and other ethical issues in both areas of analysis. Results on health disparities and SDOH were classified into five categories: racial disparities, biased data, socio-economic disparities, unequal accessibility and workforce, and information communication. SDOH needs to be considered in the clinical context, where they still seem underestimated. Epidemiological conditions depend on geographic location, so the use of local data in studies to develop international solutions may increase some biases. Gender bias was not specifically addressed in the articles included. The main biases are related to data collection and management. Ethical problems related to privacy, consent, and lack of regulation have been identified in contact tracing while some bias-related health inequalities have been highlighted. There is a need for further research focusing on SDOH and these specific AI apps. Open Access Funding provided by Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona. This work has been funded by the BBVA Foundation for SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 Research in Humanities (Detección y eliminación de sesgos en algoritmos de triaje y localización para la COVID-19). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Diana A. Gorog; Robert F. Storey; Paul A. Gurbel; Udaya S. Tantry; Jeffrey S. Berger; Mark Y. Chan; Daniel Duerschmied; Susan S. Smyth; William A. E. Parker; Ramzi A. Ajjan; +7 more
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group UK
    Country: Netherlands

    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) predisposes patients to thrombotic and thromboembolic events, owing to excessive inflammation, endothelial cell activation and injury, platelet activation and hypercoagulability. Patients with COVID-19 have a prothrombotic or thrombophilic state, with elevations in the levels of several biomarkers of thrombosis, which are associated with disease severity and prognosis. Although some biomarkers of COVID-19-associated coagulopathy, including high levels of fibrinogen and d-dimer, were recognized early during the pandemic, many new biomarkers of thrombotic risk in COVID-19 have emerged. In this Consensus Statement, we delineate the thrombotic signature of COVID-19 and present the latest biomarkers and platforms to assess the risk of thrombosis in these patients, including markers of platelet activation, platelet aggregation, endothelial cell activation or injury, coagulation and fibrinolysis as well as biomarkers of the newly recognized post-vaccine thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome. We then make consensus recommendations for the clinical use of these biomarkers to inform prognosis, assess disease acuity, and predict thrombotic risk and in-hospital mortality. A thorough understanding of these biomarkers might aid risk stratification and prognostication, guide interventions and provide a platform for future research. In this Consensus Statement, the authors delineate the thrombotic signature of COVID-19 and present the latest biomarkers and platforms to assess thrombotic risk in these patients. Consensus recommendations are made about the clinical use of these biomarkers to inform prognosis, assess disease acuity, and predict thrombosis and in-hospital mortality.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrea Idili; Andrea Bonini; Claudio Parolo; Ruslán Alvarez‐Diduk; Fabio Di Francesco; Arben Merkoçi;
    Country: Spain
    Project: EC | PROBIST (754510), EC | PREMOTHER (795635)

    Altres ajuts: ICN2 was funded by the CERCA programme, Generalitat de Catalunya. The authors acknowledge Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) for the project "COVID19-122" granted in the call "Nuevas ayudas extraordinarias a proyectos de investigación en el marco de las medidas urgentes extraordinarias para hacer frente al impacto económico y social del COVID-19 (Ayudas CSIC-COVID-19)". Proteins and antibodies are key biomarkers for diagnosing and monitoring specific medical conditions. Currently, gold standard techniques used for their quantification require laborious multi-step procedures, involving high costs and slow response times. It is possible to overcome these limitations by exploiting the chemistry and programmability of DNA to design a reagentless electrochemical sensing platform. Specifically, three DNA single strands are engineered that can self-assemble into a Y-shaped DNA nanostructure that resembles one of the IgGs. In order to convert this DNA nanostructure into a responsive DNA-scaffold bioreceptor, it is modified including two recognition elements, two redox tag molecules, and a thiol group. In the absence of the target, the scaffold receptor can efficiently collide with the electrode surface and generate a strong electrochemical signal. The presence of the target induces its bivalent binding, which produces steric hindrance interactions that limit the receptor's collisional activity. In its bound state, the redox tags can therefore approach the surface at a slower rate, leading to a signal decrease that is quantitatively related to the target concentration. The Y-shape DNA scaffold sensor can detect nanomolar concentrations of antibodies and proteins in <15 min with a single-step procedure directly in untreated biological fluids.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wei Zhang; José-Manuel Pérez-Tornero;
    Country: Spain

    Digital media platforms are used to make social contacts, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journalism also adopts mobile and social platforms into news production and distribution. The usage of digital media platforms in journalistic practices has shown some interlinkage with political participation. Against these backdrops, there is a need for a theoretical framework to analyze the interlinkage and the relevant influence on social activities. This article uses a conceptual approach and theorizes platformization to explicate the rationale behind the interaction between digital platforms, mobile journalism, and political participation. Platformization in this study inspects media as mediated and dynamic platform that values interactivity and data. We also argue that the thesis of platformization derives from mediatization theory, and consists of platform logic and platform architecture. Platform logic is represented by platform functionality, platform automation, mobile mediality, and platform-based sociality. Platformization is structured by the platform architecture in the communication activities. Platform architecture has two senses. Firstly, it has the sense of internal structure, i.e., the engineering structure of software and hardware. Secondly, it contains the sense of external structure, i.e., the platform’s structural position in the platform ecosystem.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Clara Pretus; Óscar Vilarroya;
    Country: Spain

    Acord transformatiu CRUE-CSIC Identity fusion with the community has been previously found to mediate altruism in post-disaster settings. However, whether this altruistic response is specifically triggered by ingroup threat, or whether it can also be triggered by global threats remains unclear. We evaluated willingness to sacrifice in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic across three survey waves. Against expectations, participants fused with the nation (vs. non-fused) did not differentially respond to a national versus global threat condition. Conversely, social norms decisively influenced willingness to sacrifice in this sample, with fused individuals with stronger norms about social distancing reporting the highest altruistic response during the first weeks of the pandemic. Longitudinally, after an initial peak in the altruistic response, deteriorating social norms mediated decreases in willingness to sacrifice in individuals fused with the nation (vs. non-fused). Implications of these results for the development of interventions aimed to address global challenges are discussed.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    He Yu; Alexandra Jamieson; Ardern Hulme-Beaman; Chris J. Conroy; Becky Knight; Camilla Speller; Hiba Al-Jarah; Heidi Eager; Alexandra Trinks; G. Adikari; +49 more
    Publisher: BioRxiv
    Countries: Spain, Belgium, Australia, Spain, United Kingdom, Belgium, Australia

    We thank the wet laboratory teams at MPI-SHH, the PalaeoBARN at the University of Oxford and the University of York. We thank David K. James and Lucia Hui of the Alameda County Vector Control Services District for procuring the rat used for the de novo genome. We are grateful to Sarah Nagel at Max Planck Institute for the Evolutionary Anthropology for the single-stranded library preparation, and Dovetail Genomics for the de novo genome assembly service. We thank Maria Spyrou for her suggestions and comments. We acknowledge Ewan Chipping and Helena England (University of York), Carl Phillips, Veronica Lindholm (Ålands Museum), Christine McDonnell and Nienke van Doorn (York Archaeological Trust), Emile Mittendorf (Gemeente Deventer), Inge Riemersma (Archaeological depot, Provincie Zuid-Holland), the Turkish Ministry of Culture & Tourism, Jan Frolík and Iva Herichová (Institute of Archaeology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague), Franz Humer and Eduard Pollhammer (Archaeological Park Carnuntum), Dorottya B. Nyékhelyi and László Daróczi-Szabó (Budapest History Museum), Institut National du Patrimoine (Tunisia), University of Barcelona, Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (Project HUM2006-03432/HIST), Spanish Ministry of Culture (program of archaeological excavations abroad 2009); Spanish Agency of International Cooperation for the Development (2009), Catalan Institute of Classical Archaeology (ICAC), Vujadin Ivanisević, Nemanja Marković and Ivan Bugarski (Archaeological Institute 809 Belgrade), the Field Museum Chicago, the British National History Museum and the American Museum of Natural History for providing materials and support. G.L. and A.J. were supported by the ERC (grant ERC-2013-StG-337574-UNDEAD) and A.J. was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council Doctoral Training Program. D.O. was supported by Wellcome (Small Grant in Humanities and Social Science 209817/Z) and the British Academy / Leverhulme Trust (Small Research Grant SG170938). E.R. was supported by Estonian Research Council grant No PRG29. R.K. was supported by the Czech Academy of Sciences institutional support (RVO:67985912). S.V.-L. was supported by the ERC (grant ERC-StG- 716298 ZooMWest). H.E. was funded by an ERC grant (206148) through the Sealinks Project. A.H.B was funded by the Leverhulme Trust (ECF-2017-315). The de novo genome assembly, population genomics study, and radiocarbon dating were funded by the Max Planck Society. The distribution of the black rat (Rattus rattus) has been heavily influenced by its association with humans. The dispersal history of this non-native commensal rodent across Europe, however, remains poorly understood, and different introductions may have occurred during the Roman and medieval periods. Here, in order to reconstruct the population history of European black rats, we generated a de novo genome assembly of the black rat, 67 ancient black rat mitogenomes and 36 ancient nuclear genomes from sites spanning the 1st-17th centuries CE in Europe and North Africa. Analyses of mitochondrial DNA confirm that black rats were introduced into the Mediterranean and Europe from Southwest Asia. Genomic analyses of the ancient rats reveal a population turnover in temperate Europe between the 6th and 10th centuries CE, coincident with an archaeologically attested decline in the black rat population. The near disappearance and re-emergence of black rats in Europe may have been the result of the breakdown of the Roman Empire, the First Plague Pandemic, and/or post-Roman climatic cooling. Peer reviewed

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