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  • 2013-2022
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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    Part of book: ISBN 978-1-009-10023-6QC 20221219

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker; Dale, Brigt; Keeling, Arn; Larsen, Joan Nymand;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    Extractivism has been predominant in the Arctic since whaling and sealing campaigns began in the sixteenth century, followed by mining and drilling for oil and gas. In this chapter we present some of the main features of this ‘extractivist history’ of the circumpolar region. We organize this development along a set of themes. First, we explore the extractive frame of mind in Western thought and how it has continued to shape visions of the region. Second, we explore the material and social impacts of historical extractivism. Third, we use the theoretical lens of colonialism and decolonialism to understand the social and political relations, especially with aboriginal populations. Fourth, we examine the, often fraught, recent and contemporary debates around contemporary and future extractivism and its implications for the Arctic. The historical overview serves the purpose of providing a legible pattern from what is also a range of diverse and rich variations. A key finding is that extractivism is a lasting legacy and a path dependency of the region. At the same time resource extraction has many problematic sides that the seeking of new Arctic futures will have to deal with. QC 20221215Chapter in book: ISBN 978-1-009-10023-6

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sverker Sörlin;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    QC 20221219

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Andersson, Daniel;
    Publisher: Umea University Library
    Country: Sweden

    This article examines history mediation and the relationship between education and academia. The aim is to investigate historical representations of the Christianisation in Sweden from 1915 to 1996, by doing a comparative analysis of the content in research publications and history textbooks for upper secondary school (or the equivalent). The research field and the textbooks are perceived as two different knowledge arenas. The analysis shows how the two arenas are more harmonious and consistent in their representations of Christianisation during the early twentieth century. In the mid-twentieth century, the arenas deviated from each other for an extended period, before finally becoming more unitary again by the end of the century. The impact of the schools’ steering documents, as well as the distinctiveness of the two arenas, seems to constitute the conditions for inconsistencies between them at different times. The analysis also suggests that the educational applicability of the knowledge content in contemporary research, likewise impacts the relationship between the two arenas.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Norén, Fredrik; Jarlbrink, Johan; Borg, Alexandra; Edoff, Erik; Magnusson, Måns;
    Publisher: De Gruyter
    Country: Sweden

    This paper explores what was explicitly defined as ‘political’ duringthe post-war era, from 1945 to 1989, in two Swedish newspapers. Based on allextracted text blocks containing the term ‘political’, two research questions areexamined: How has the use of the term “political” evolved over time? In whichcontexts was the concept inscribed, and how did these change over time? In-spired by conceptual history, the analysis is divided into three parts: an examina-tion of ‘political’ through bigram extractions, contextual explorations using topicmodeling, and a close reading of one particular topic over time, the topic labeled‘women’. The result shows an increased use of the term ‘political’ from the1960s, with more things that were labeled as ‘political’. The analysis reveals thatthe concept was broadened, but not entirely redefined.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lars Fredrik Andersson; Liselotte Eriksson; Josef Lilljegren;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)
    Country: Sweden

    Mutual benefit societies evolved as the major provider for sickness, accident and life insurance in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries on both sides of the Atlantic. One of the major problems facing insurers was the risk of adverse selection, i.e. that unhealthy individuals had more incentives than healthy individuals to insure when priced for the average risk. By empirically examining whether longevity among insured individuals in a nationwide mutual health society was different from a matched sample of uninsured individuals, we seek to identify the presence of adverse selection. We find no compelling evidence showing that unhealthy individuals were more likely to insure, or reasons to believe that problems related to adverse selection would have been a major reason for government intervention in the health insurance market in Sweden.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Holmén, Janne; Ringarp, Johanna;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Sweden

    In the past few centuries, an accelerating process of legalization and classification have moulded the diverse range of earlier institutions into a limited number of isomorphic organizational forms. Today, institutions of higher education, with their roots in the corporate forms of medieval universities, can also have the legal status of, for example, government agencies, associations under public law, foundations, and joint stock companies. This article investigates the types of legal entities Swedish and Finnish institutions of higher education have been organized into in the period from the 1990s until 2020, and why these particular types have been chosen. It also explores how the special characteristics, aims, and demands of the university have caused adaptations to organizational forms such as joint stock companies and foundations. Comparative studies benefit from investigating societies that are as similar to each other as possible, making it easier to identify and isolate the effects of the factors that actually differ. In this respect, Finland and Sweden are ideal for comparative studies. Both Swedish and Finnish institutions of higher education have experienced coercive, mimetic, normative, and managerial-professional isomorphic pressure. However, there are important pre-existing national differences, such as the greater reliance on public agencies in Sweden and the multiplicity of semi-private legal entities in Finland, most significantly the associations under public law. These differences made the transition of universities into independent legal entities seem natural in Finland in 2009, while it was too radical in the Swedish context. 

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johannes Edvardsson; Anton Hansson; Mattias Sjölander; Johan von Boer; Philip Buckland; Hans Linderson; Björn Gunnarson; Hans W Linderholm; Igor Drobyshev; Dan Hammarlund;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract The Old Wood in a New Light database project focuses on the digitization and accessibility of the results of dendrochronological samples analyzed and archived at four Swedish university-based tree-ring laboratories at Lund University, Stockholm University, University of Gothenburg, and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Collaboration with the Environmental Archaeology Laboratory and Humlab at Umeå University enables long-term open access to data, raw data, and metadata. In this project, we (1) systematically undertake large-scale entry and open access publication of results from wood samples scientifically analyzed and archived by Swedish laboratories and the associated metadata, into the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD; www.sead.se) research data infrastructure, and (2) actively promote the database as a resource for new and ongoing interdisciplinary research initiatives. Including dendrochronological data in SEAD infrastructure allows interdisciplinary studies that combine major scientific and societal questions. Building on a pilot study of construction timber from southern Sweden and adaptation of SEAD digitization workflows, more than 70 000 samples archived at the four dendrochronological laboratories are now being handled in the project. The broad coverage of research networks, stakeholder interaction, and strategic support from the cultural heritage community is guaranteed owing to the ongoing collaboration between laboratories and an established international and multidisciplinary reference group.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Erik Jönsson; Johan Pries; Don Mitchell;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Country: Sweden

    Engaging with scholarship on hegemony, park history, and in particular with Sevilla-Buitrago’s analysis of Central Park as a pedagogical space, this article traces the establishment of two parks in the Swedish textile industry centre of Norrköping. These parks, bearing very similar names – Folkparken and Folkets Park – were established just six years apart. But though both parks linked “park” and “people” ( Folk), their intended political effects were radically different. The 1895 Folkparken was an elite attempt to create a de-politicised landscape park, while the 1901 Folkets Park was instead the labour movement’s attempt to create their own space. Exploring this latter park enables telling a story of park production beyond elite dominance. Like dozens of similar labour-controlled parks across Sweden, the People’s Park allowed Norrköping’s labour movement to shape their landscape long before the Social Democrats made any significant inroads into parliamentary politics. Combining a platform for socialistic agitation, with a theatre and space for recreation, this park quickly became central to Norrköping’s working class. Thereby, it could both enable social-democratic presence at an everyday level, and function as an important resource during periods of intense class-struggle.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adam Hjorthén;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen Svenska institutet för nordamerikastudier (SINAS)
    Country: Sweden

    This article investigates the modern history of genealogy through the lens of keyword indexes – an essential resource for access to genealogical information. Empirically, the article studies the role of indexes in Euro-American genealogy from the nineteenth century to today. Particular attention is paid to the 1960s–2010s, when genealogy changed through growing popular engagement, new technologies, rising and falling academic interest, and increased commercialisation. Focusing on a set of grassroots cases from Sweden that have been crucial to the subfield of Swedish-American genealogy, the article explores the work of local Swedish heritage societies and the dream of empirical ‘totality’; the cooperation between heritage societies and academic historians; the impact of microfilm and digital technologies in creating a sense of information overload; the economy of unpaid volunteer and state-subsidised labour; and how paper-based indexes, created largely through grassroots initiatives, have been transformed into digital commodities on an international genealogical market. While this is an important enquiry for understanding the history of genealogy – one of the most widespread popular pursuits in modern history – it also addresses the intricate relations between grassroots initiatives, academic research, and capitalism in modern archive history.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
10,770 Research products, page 1 of 1,077
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    Part of book: ISBN 978-1-009-10023-6QC 20221219

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sörlin, Sverker; Dale, Brigt; Keeling, Arn; Larsen, Joan Nymand;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Country: Sweden

    Extractivism has been predominant in the Arctic since whaling and sealing campaigns began in the sixteenth century, followed by mining and drilling for oil and gas. In this chapter we present some of the main features of this ‘extractivist history’ of the circumpolar region. We organize this development along a set of themes. First, we explore the extractive frame of mind in Western thought and how it has continued to shape visions of the region. Second, we explore the material and social impacts of historical extractivism. Third, we use the theoretical lens of colonialism and decolonialism to understand the social and political relations, especially with aboriginal populations. Fourth, we examine the, often fraught, recent and contemporary debates around contemporary and future extractivism and its implications for the Arctic. The historical overview serves the purpose of providing a legible pattern from what is also a range of diverse and rich variations. A key finding is that extractivism is a lasting legacy and a path dependency of the region. At the same time resource extraction has many problematic sides that the seeking of new Arctic futures will have to deal with. QC 20221215Chapter in book: ISBN 978-1-009-10023-6

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sverker Sörlin;
    Publisher: KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö
    Country: Sweden

    QC 20221219

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Andersson, Daniel;
    Publisher: Umea University Library
    Country: Sweden

    This article examines history mediation and the relationship between education and academia. The aim is to investigate historical representations of the Christianisation in Sweden from 1915 to 1996, by doing a comparative analysis of the content in research publications and history textbooks for upper secondary school (or the equivalent). The research field and the textbooks are perceived as two different knowledge arenas. The analysis shows how the two arenas are more harmonious and consistent in their representations of Christianisation during the early twentieth century. In the mid-twentieth century, the arenas deviated from each other for an extended period, before finally becoming more unitary again by the end of the century. The impact of the schools’ steering documents, as well as the distinctiveness of the two arenas, seems to constitute the conditions for inconsistencies between them at different times. The analysis also suggests that the educational applicability of the knowledge content in contemporary research, likewise impacts the relationship between the two arenas.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Norén, Fredrik; Jarlbrink, Johan; Borg, Alexandra; Edoff, Erik; Magnusson, Måns;
    Publisher: De Gruyter
    Country: Sweden

    This paper explores what was explicitly defined as ‘political’ duringthe post-war era, from 1945 to 1989, in two Swedish newspapers. Based on allextracted text blocks containing the term ‘political’, two research questions areexamined: How has the use of the term “political” evolved over time? In whichcontexts was the concept inscribed, and how did these change over time? In-spired by conceptual history, the analysis is divided into three parts: an examina-tion of ‘political’ through bigram extractions, contextual explorations using topicmodeling, and a close reading of one particular topic over time, the topic labeled‘women’. The result shows an increased use of the term ‘political’ from the1960s, with more things that were labeled as ‘political’. The analysis reveals thatthe concept was broadened, but not entirely redefined.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lars Fredrik Andersson; Liselotte Eriksson; Josef Lilljegren;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press (CUP)
    Country: Sweden

    Mutual benefit societies evolved as the major provider for sickness, accident and life insurance in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries on both sides of the Atlantic. One of the major problems facing insurers was the risk of adverse selection, i.e. that unhealthy individuals had more incentives than healthy individuals to insure when priced for the average risk. By empirically examining whether longevity among insured individuals in a nationwide mutual health society was different from a matched sample of uninsured individuals, we seek to identify the presence of adverse selection. We find no compelling evidence showing that unhealthy individuals were more likely to insure, or reasons to believe that problems related to adverse selection would have been a major reason for government intervention in the health insurance market in Sweden.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Holmén, Janne; Ringarp, Johanna;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Sweden

    In the past few centuries, an accelerating process of legalization and classification have moulded the diverse range of earlier institutions into a limited number of isomorphic organizational forms. Today, institutions of higher education, with their roots in the corporate forms of medieval universities, can also have the legal status of, for example, government agencies, associations under public law, foundations, and joint stock companies. This article investigates the types of legal entities Swedish and Finnish institutions of higher education have been organized into in the period from the 1990s until 2020, and why these particular types have been chosen. It also explores how the special characteristics, aims, and demands of the university have caused adaptations to organizational forms such as joint stock companies and foundations. Comparative studies benefit from investigating societies that are as similar to each other as possible, making it easier to identify and isolate the effects of the factors that actually differ. In this respect, Finland and Sweden are ideal for comparative studies. Both Swedish and Finnish institutions of higher education have experienced coercive, mimetic, normative, and managerial-professional isomorphic pressure. However, there are important pre-existing national differences, such as the greater reliance on public agencies in Sweden and the multiplicity of semi-private legal entities in Finland, most significantly the associations under public law. These differences made the transition of universities into independent legal entities seem natural in Finland in 2009, while it was too radical in the Swedish context. 

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johannes Edvardsson; Anton Hansson; Mattias Sjölander; Johan von Boer; Philip Buckland; Hans Linderson; Björn Gunnarson; Hans W Linderholm; Igor Drobyshev; Dan Hammarlund;
    Publisher: Umeå universitet, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet
    Country: Sweden

    Abstract The Old Wood in a New Light database project focuses on the digitization and accessibility of the results of dendrochronological samples analyzed and archived at four Swedish university-based tree-ring laboratories at Lund University, Stockholm University, University of Gothenburg, and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Collaboration with the Environmental Archaeology Laboratory and Humlab at Umeå University enables long-term open access to data, raw data, and metadata. In this project, we (1) systematically undertake large-scale entry and open access publication of results from wood samples scientifically analyzed and archived by Swedish laboratories and the associated metadata, into the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD; www.sead.se) research data infrastructure, and (2) actively promote the database as a resource for new and ongoing interdisciplinary research initiatives. Including dendrochronological data in SEAD infrastructure allows interdisciplinary studies that combine major scientific and societal questions. Building on a pilot study of construction timber from southern Sweden and adaptation of SEAD digitization workflows, more than 70 000 samples archived at the four dendrochronological laboratories are now being handled in the project. The broad coverage of research networks, stakeholder interaction, and strategic support from the cultural heritage community is guaranteed owing to the ongoing collaboration between laboratories and an established international and multidisciplinary reference group.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Erik Jönsson; Johan Pries; Don Mitchell;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Country: Sweden

    Engaging with scholarship on hegemony, park history, and in particular with Sevilla-Buitrago’s analysis of Central Park as a pedagogical space, this article traces the establishment of two parks in the Swedish textile industry centre of Norrköping. These parks, bearing very similar names – Folkparken and Folkets Park – were established just six years apart. But though both parks linked “park” and “people” ( Folk), their intended political effects were radically different. The 1895 Folkparken was an elite attempt to create a de-politicised landscape park, while the 1901 Folkets Park was instead the labour movement’s attempt to create their own space. Exploring this latter park enables telling a story of park production beyond elite dominance. Like dozens of similar labour-controlled parks across Sweden, the People’s Park allowed Norrköping’s labour movement to shape their landscape long before the Social Democrats made any significant inroads into parliamentary politics. Combining a platform for socialistic agitation, with a theatre and space for recreation, this park quickly became central to Norrköping’s working class. Thereby, it could both enable social-democratic presence at an everyday level, and function as an important resource during periods of intense class-struggle.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Adam Hjorthén;
    Publisher: Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen Svenska institutet för nordamerikastudier (SINAS)
    Country: Sweden

    This article investigates the modern history of genealogy through the lens of keyword indexes – an essential resource for access to genealogical information. Empirically, the article studies the role of indexes in Euro-American genealogy from the nineteenth century to today. Particular attention is paid to the 1960s–2010s, when genealogy changed through growing popular engagement, new technologies, rising and falling academic interest, and increased commercialisation. Focusing on a set of grassroots cases from Sweden that have been crucial to the subfield of Swedish-American genealogy, the article explores the work of local Swedish heritage societies and the dream of empirical ‘totality’; the cooperation between heritage societies and academic historians; the impact of microfilm and digital technologies in creating a sense of information overload; the economy of unpaid volunteer and state-subsidised labour; and how paper-based indexes, created largely through grassroots initiatives, have been transformed into digital commodities on an international genealogical market. While this is an important enquiry for understanding the history of genealogy – one of the most widespread popular pursuits in modern history – it also addresses the intricate relations between grassroots initiatives, academic research, and capitalism in modern archive history.

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