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  • The Tromsø Repository of Language and Linguistics (TROLLing)

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wierling, August; Schwanitz, Valeria Jana; Zeiss, Jan Pedro; von Beck, Constantin; Arghandeh Paudler, Heather; Knutsdotter Koren, Ingrid; Kraudzun, Tobias; Marcroft, Timothy; Müller, Lukas; Andreadakis, Zacharias; +16 more
    Publisher: DataverseNO
    Project: EC | COMETS (837722)

    This dataset describes the collective involvement of citizens in the energy transition with a focus on 2010-2021 across 29 countries in Europe. It is the first systematic data collection of its kind. Data are collected for the initiatives citizens are leading, fields of activities they engage in (e.g., installation of renewable capacities, operation of charging infrastructure for electric vehicles, engagement in energy education and services provision), number of people involved or being members, financial data of initiatives, and characteristics of production units planned, installed, operated and/or purchased by the initiatives.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Leivada, Evelina; Westergaard, Marit;
    Publisher: DataverseNO
    Project: EC | DIVA (746652)

    This research put the nature and rigidity of linguistic hierarchies to test, taking multiple adjective placement as a case study. We developed an on-line forced choice experiment that measured (i) acceptability judgment ratings and (ii) reaction times, in a big sample of neurotypical, adult speakers of Standard Greek (n=140) and Cypriot Greek (n=30). The task compares what happens when people are asked to process sentences that either comply with or violate allegedly universal ordering constraints that have been described as the outcome of innately wired hierarchies. Our findings do not provide any evidence for a universal hierarchy for adjective ordering that imposes one rigid, unmarked order. We argue that the obtained results are effectively reducing the amount of primitives that are cast as innate, eventually offering a deflationist approach to human linguistic cognition.

Advanced search in
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Searching FieldsTerms
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2 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wierling, August; Schwanitz, Valeria Jana; Zeiss, Jan Pedro; von Beck, Constantin; Arghandeh Paudler, Heather; Knutsdotter Koren, Ingrid; Kraudzun, Tobias; Marcroft, Timothy; Müller, Lukas; Andreadakis, Zacharias; +16 more
    Publisher: DataverseNO
    Project: EC | COMETS (837722)

    This dataset describes the collective involvement of citizens in the energy transition with a focus on 2010-2021 across 29 countries in Europe. It is the first systematic data collection of its kind. Data are collected for the initiatives citizens are leading, fields of activities they engage in (e.g., installation of renewable capacities, operation of charging infrastructure for electric vehicles, engagement in energy education and services provision), number of people involved or being members, financial data of initiatives, and characteristics of production units planned, installed, operated and/or purchased by the initiatives.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Leivada, Evelina; Westergaard, Marit;
    Publisher: DataverseNO
    Project: EC | DIVA (746652)

    This research put the nature and rigidity of linguistic hierarchies to test, taking multiple adjective placement as a case study. We developed an on-line forced choice experiment that measured (i) acceptability judgment ratings and (ii) reaction times, in a big sample of neurotypical, adult speakers of Standard Greek (n=140) and Cypriot Greek (n=30). The task compares what happens when people are asked to process sentences that either comply with or violate allegedly universal ordering constraints that have been described as the outcome of innately wired hierarchies. Our findings do not provide any evidence for a universal hierarchy for adjective ordering that imposes one rigid, unmarked order. We argue that the obtained results are effectively reducing the amount of primitives that are cast as innate, eventually offering a deflationist approach to human linguistic cognition.

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