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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maia Meparishvili; Lela Chitadze; Vincenzo Lagani; Brian McCabe; Revaz Solomonia; Revaz Solomonia;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | CHARM-Vis (867429)

    Visual imprinting is a learning process whereby young animals come to prefer a visual stimulus after exposure to it (training). The available evidence indicates that the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM) in the domestic chick forebrain is a site of memory formation during visual imprinting. We have studied the role of Src, an important non-receptor tyrosine kinase, in memory formation. Amounts of total Src (Total-Src) and its two phosphorylated forms, tyrosine-416 (activated, 416P-Src) and tyrosine-527 (inhibited, 527P-Src), were measured 1 and 24 h after training in the IMM and in a control brain region, the posterior pole of nidopallium (PPN). One hour after training, in the left IMM, we observed a positive correlation between the amount of 527P-Src and learning strength that was attributable to learning, and there was also a positive correlation between 416P-Src and learning strength that was attributable to a predisposition to learn readily. Twenty-four hours after training, the amount of Total-Src increased with learning strength in both the left and right IMM, and amount of 527P-Src increased with learning strength only in the left IMM; both correlations were attributable to learning. A further, negative, correlation between learning strength and 416P-Src/Total-Src in the left IMM reflected a predisposition to learn. No learning-related changes were found in the PPN control region. We suggest that there are two pools of Src; one of them in an active state and reflecting a predisposition to learn, and the second one in an inhibited condition, which increases as a result of learning. These two pools may represent two or more signaling pathways, namely, one pathway downstream of Src activated by tyrosine-416 phosphorylation and another upstream of Src, keeping the enzyme in an inactivated state via phosphorylation of tyrosine-527.

  • Publication . Article . 2021 . Embargo End Date: 26 Aug 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thomas Bergauer; Marko Dragicevic; A. Escalante Del Valle; Natascha Krammer; Jochen Schieck; Wolfgang Waltenberger; V. Makarenko; Freya Blekman; Emil Sørensen Bols; Stefaan Tavernier; +419 more
    Publisher: ETH Zurich
    Countries: Switzerland, Czech Republic, Italy, Belgium, Spain, United States, Russian Federation, Italy, Belgium, Spain ...
    Project: EC | AMVA4NewPhysics (675440), EC | LHCTOPVLQ (752730), EC | INSIGHTS (765710), EC | HIGCC (724704)

    Events where the two leading jets are separated by a pseudorapidity interval devoid of particle activity, known as jet-gap-jet events, are studied in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV. The signature is expected from hard color-singlet exchange. Each of the highest transverse momentum (p(T)) jets must have p(T)(jet) > 40 GeV and pseudorapidity 1.4 0.2 GeV in the interval vertical bar eta vertical bar < 1 between the jets are observed in excess of calculations that assume only color-exchange. The fraction of events produced via color-singlet exchange, f(CSE), is measured as a function of p(T)(jet2), the pseudorapidity difference between the two leading jets, and the azimuthal angular separation between the two leading jets. The fraction f(CSE) has values of 0.4-1.0%. The results are compared with previous measurements and with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics. In addition, the first study of jet-gap-jet events detected in association with an intact proton using a subsample of events with an integrated luminosity of 0.40 pb(-1) is presented. The intact protons are detected with the Roman pot detectors of the TOTEM experiment. The f(CSE) in this sample is 2.91 +/- 0.70(stat)(-1.01)(+1.08)(syst) times larger than that for inclusive dijet production in dijets with similar kinematics. Physical Review D, 104 (3) ISSN:0556-2821 ISSN:1550-2368 ISSN:1550-7998

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gelabert, Pere; Sawyer, Susanna; Bergström, Anders; Margaryan, Ashot; Collin, Thomas C; Meshveliani, Tengiz; Belfer-Cohen, Anna; Lordkipanidze, David; Jakeli, Nino; Matskevich, Zinovi; +11 more
    Countries: Denmark, Netherlands
    Project: EC | CSEYHP (217223), EC | AGRICON (852558)

    Summary Cave sediments have been shown to preserve ancient DNA but so far have not yielded the genome-scale information of skeletal remains. We retrieved and analyzed human and mammalian nuclear and mitochondrial environmental "shotgun" genomes from a single 25,000-year-old Upper Paleolithic sediment sample from Satsurblia cave, western Georgia:first, a human environmental genome with substantial basal Eurasian ancestry, which was an ancestral component of the majority of post-Ice Age people in the Near East, North Africa, and parts of Europe; second, a wolf environmental genome that is basal to extant Eurasian wolves and dogs and represents a previously unknown, likely extinct, Caucasian lineage; and third, a European bison environmental genome that is basal to present-day populations, suggesting that population structure has been substantially reshaped since the Last Glacial Maximum. Our results provide new insights into the Late Pleistocene genetic histories of these three species and demonstrate that direct shotgun sequencing of sediment DNA, without target enrichment methods, can yield genome-wide data informative of ancestry and phylogenetic relationships.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    George Lavrelashvili; Jean-Luc Lehners; Marc Schneider;
    Publisher: APS
    Project: EC | Qosmology (772295)

    We study a self-interacting scalar field theory coupled to gravity and are interested in spherically symmetric solutions with a regular origin surrounded by a horizon. For a scalar potential containing a barrier, and using the most general spherically symmetric ansatz, we show that in addition to the known static, oscillating solutions discussed earlier in the literature there exist new classes of solutions which appear in the strong field case. For these solutions the spatial sphere shrinks either beyond the horizon, implying a collapsing universe outside of the cosmological horizon, or it shrinks already inside of the horizon, implying the existence of a black hole surrounding the scalar lump in all directions. Crucial for the existence of all such solutions is the presence of a scalar field potential with a barrier that satisfies the swampland conjectures. 21 pages, 10 figures, v2: replaced with published version

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aaron J. Monson; Mihalis Mathioudakis; Aaron Reid; Ryan O. Milligan; David Kuridze;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: UKRI | Queen's University Belfas... (ST/P000304/1), EC | F-CHROMA (606862), UKRI | STFC Belfast 2019 DTP (ST/T506369/1), UKRI | Queen's University Belfas... (ST/T00021X/1)

    We present radiative hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares generated by the RADYN and RH codes to study the perturbations induced in photospheric Fe I lines by electron beam heating. We investigate how variations in the beam parameters result in discernible differences in the induced photospheric velocities. Line synthesis revealed a significant chromospheric contribution to the line profiles resulting in an apparent red asymmetry by as much as 40 m/s close to the time of maximum beam heating which was not reflective of the upflow velocities that arose from the radiative hydrodynamic simulations at those times. The apparent redshift to the overall line profile was produced by significant chromospheric emission that was blueshifted by as much as 400 m/s and fills in the blue side of the near stationary photospheric absorption profile. The velocity information that can be retrieved from photospheric line profiles during flares must therefore be treated with care to mitigate the effects of higher parts of the atmosphere providing an erroneous velocity signal. 14 pages, 8 figures

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . Preprint . Research . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    R. Frühwirth; Natascha Krammer; Lukas Lechner; Navid Rad; N. Van Remortel; Amandeep Kaur Kalsi; Inna Makarenko; Illia Khvastunov; Marek Niedziela; Giacomo Bruno; +233 more
    Countries: Spain, Germany, Belgium, Germany, Russian Federation, Finland, United States, Italy, Italy, United Kingdom ...
    Project: EC | AMVA4NewPhysics (675440), EC | LHCTOPVLQ (752730), EC | HIGCC (724704), EC | INSIGHTS (765710)

    The performance is presented of the reconstruction and identification algorithms for electrons and photons with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The reported results are based on proton-proton collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and recorded in 2016–2018, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 136 fb^-1. Results obtained from lead-lead collision data collected at √(sNN)=5.02 TeV are also presented. Innovative techniques are used to reconstruct the electron and photon signals in the detector and to optimize the energy resolution. Events with electrons and photons in the final state are used to measure the energy resolution and energy scale uncertainty in the recorded events. The measured energy resolution for electrons produced in Z boson decays in proton-proton collision data ranges from 2 to 5%, depending on electron pseudorapidity and energy loss through bremsstrahlung in the detector material. The energy scale in the same range of energies is measured with an uncertainty smaller than 0.1 (0.3)% in the barrel (endcap) region in proton-proton collisions and better than 1 (3)% in the barrel (endcap) region in heavy ion collisions. The timing resolution for electrons from Z boson decays with the full 2016–2018 proton-proton collision data set is measured to be 200 ps. Individuals have received support from the Marie-Curie program and the European Research Council and Horizon 2020 Grant, contract Nos. 675440, 724704, 752730, and 765710 (European Union); the Programa de Excelencia María de Maeztu, and the Programa Severo Ochoa del Principado de Asturias CERN for the benefit of the CMS collaboration: et al. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maxim Mai; Michael Döring; Carlos Granados; Helmut Haberzettl; Ulf-G. Meißner; D. Rönchen; I. I. Strakovsky; Ron L. Workman;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | STRONG-2020 (824093)

    Pion electroproduction off the proton is analyzed in a new framework based on a general parametrization of transition amplitudes, including constraints from gauge invariance and threshold behavior. Data with energies $1.13~{\rm GeV}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jennifer K. Bosson; Paweł Jurek; Joseph A. Vandello; Natasza Kosakowska-Berezecka; Michał Olech; Tomasz Besta; Michael Bender; Vera Hoorens; Maja Becker; A. Timur Sevincer; +152 more
    Publisher: Sage Publications
    Countries: Denmark, Spain, Switzerland, Norway, Portugal, Netherlands, Portugal, Italy, Poland, Australia ...
    Project: EC | CIC (725128)

    The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This research was funded by a Grant from the National Science Centre in Poland (Grant Number: 2017/26/M/HS6/00360) awarded to Natasza Kosakowska-Berezecka. Data collection by the following researchers was supported by Grants as follows: Emma C. O'Connor (Grant RL5GM118963 from National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health; Angel Gomez (Grant RTI2018-093550-B-I00 from the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Spain); Sylvie Graf and Martina Hrebickova (Grant 20-01214S from the Czech Science Foundation, and Grant RVO: 68081740 from the Institute of Psychology, Czech Academy of Sciences); Teri A. Kirby (Grant ES/S00274X/1 from the Economic and Social Research Council); Soledad de Lemus (Grant PSI2016-79971-P from Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through the excellence); Michelle K. Ryan and Renata Bongiorno (Grant ERC-2016-COG 725128 from the European Research Council awarded to Michelle K. Ryan); Marie Gustafsson Senden, Anna Lindqvist and Emma Renstrom (Grant 2017-00414 from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare); Claudio V. Torres (Grant DPI/DIRPE n. 04/2019 from the University of Brasilia). Precarious manhood beliefs portray manhood, relative to womanhood, as a social status that is hard to earn, easy to lose, and proven via public action. Whereas qualitative and ethnographic data suggest that many cultures conceptualize manhood as precarious, quantitative research has yet to demonstrate the cross-cultural consistency of precarious manhood beliefs. Here, we examined the psychometric isomorphism, or measurement invariance, of a brief precarious manhood beliefs scale (the PMB). Using data from university samples in 62 countries across 13 world regions (N=33,417), we examined: (1) the isomorphism of the PMB across individual and country levels; (2) the PMB’s distinctness from, and associations with, other cross-culturally validated gender ideologies (e.g., ambivalent sexism and ambivalence toward men; Glick & Fiske, 1996, 1999); and (3) associations of the PMB with country-level indices of gender equality (the GGGI; World Economic Forum, 2019) and human development (the HDI; United Nations Development Programme, 2019). Findings indicate that the PMB is a psychometrically valid and isomorphic index of beliefs about the male gender role that accounts for unique variance in country-level gender equality and human development. United States Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) RL5GM118963 Swedish Research Council Swedish Research Council for Health Working Life & Welfare (Forte) 2017-00414 UK Research & Innovation (UKRI) Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) ES/S00274X/1 This study was preregistered in Open Science Framework at https://osf.io/u9xfg/. Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Spain RTI2018-093550-B-I00 European Research Council (ERC) European Commission ERC-2016-COG 725128 Institute of Psychology, Czech Academy of Sciences RVO: 68081740 Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness PSI2016-79971-P National Science Center, Poland 2017/26/M/HS6/00360 Grant Agency of the Czech Republic 20-01214S University of Brasilia 04/2019

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sara Price; Carey Jewitt; Dimitri Chubinidze; Ned Barker; Nikoleta Yiannoutsou;
    Project: EC | IN-TOUCH (681489)

    Bringing touch into VR experiences through haptics is considered increasingly important for user engagement and fostering feelings of presence and immersion, yet few qualitative studies have explored users' iVR touch experiences. This paper takes an embodied approach–bringing attention to the tactile-kinaesthetic body–to explore users' wholistic experiences of touch in iVR, moving beyond the cutaneous and tactile elements of “feeling” to elaborate upon themes of movement and kinetics. Our findings show how both touch connections and disconnections emerged though material forms of tactility (the controller, body positioning, tactile expectations) and through “felt proximities” and the tactile-kinaesthetic experience thus shaping the sense of presence. The analysis shows three key factors that influence connection and disconnection, and how connection is re-navigated or sought at moments of experienced disconnection: a sense of control or agency; identity; and bridging between the material and virtual. This extended notion of touch deepens our understanding of its role in feelings of presence by providing insight into a range of factors related to notions of touch – both physical and virtual–that come into play in creating a sense of connection or presence (e.g., histories, expectations), and highlights the potential for iVR interaction to attend to the body beyond the hands in terms of touch.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yong-Hui Lin; Hans-Werner Hammer; Ulf-G. Meißner;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | STRONG-2020 (824093)

    Using dispersion theory with an improved description of the two-pion continuum based on the precise Roy-Steiner analysis of pion-nucleon scattering, we analyze recent data from electron-proton scattering. This allows for a high-precision determination of the electric and magnetic radius of the proton, $r_E = (0.838^{+0.005}_{-0.004}{}^{+0.004}_{-0.003})\,$fm and $r_M = (0.847\pm{0.004}\pm{0.004})\,$fm, where the first error refers to the fitting procedure using bootstrap and the data while the second one refers to the systematic uncertainty related to the underlying spectral functions. 8 pages, 2 figures, more discussions and references added, version accepted for publication in Physics Letters B

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194 Research products, page 1 of 20
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maia Meparishvili; Lela Chitadze; Vincenzo Lagani; Brian McCabe; Revaz Solomonia; Revaz Solomonia;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | CHARM-Vis (867429)

    Visual imprinting is a learning process whereby young animals come to prefer a visual stimulus after exposure to it (training). The available evidence indicates that the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM) in the domestic chick forebrain is a site of memory formation during visual imprinting. We have studied the role of Src, an important non-receptor tyrosine kinase, in memory formation. Amounts of total Src (Total-Src) and its two phosphorylated forms, tyrosine-416 (activated, 416P-Src) and tyrosine-527 (inhibited, 527P-Src), were measured 1 and 24 h after training in the IMM and in a control brain region, the posterior pole of nidopallium (PPN). One hour after training, in the left IMM, we observed a positive correlation between the amount of 527P-Src and learning strength that was attributable to learning, and there was also a positive correlation between 416P-Src and learning strength that was attributable to a predisposition to learn readily. Twenty-four hours after training, the amount of Total-Src increased with learning strength in both the left and right IMM, and amount of 527P-Src increased with learning strength only in the left IMM; both correlations were attributable to learning. A further, negative, correlation between learning strength and 416P-Src/Total-Src in the left IMM reflected a predisposition to learn. No learning-related changes were found in the PPN control region. We suggest that there are two pools of Src; one of them in an active state and reflecting a predisposition to learn, and the second one in an inhibited condition, which increases as a result of learning. These two pools may represent two or more signaling pathways, namely, one pathway downstream of Src activated by tyrosine-416 phosphorylation and another upstream of Src, keeping the enzyme in an inactivated state via phosphorylation of tyrosine-527.

  • Publication . Article . 2021 . Embargo End Date: 26 Aug 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thomas Bergauer; Marko Dragicevic; A. Escalante Del Valle; Natascha Krammer; Jochen Schieck; Wolfgang Waltenberger; V. Makarenko; Freya Blekman; Emil Sørensen Bols; Stefaan Tavernier; +419 more
    Publisher: ETH Zurich
    Countries: Switzerland, Czech Republic, Italy, Belgium, Spain, United States, Russian Federation, Italy, Belgium, Spain ...
    Project: EC | AMVA4NewPhysics (675440), EC | LHCTOPVLQ (752730), EC | INSIGHTS (765710), EC | HIGCC (724704)

    Events where the two leading jets are separated by a pseudorapidity interval devoid of particle activity, known as jet-gap-jet events, are studied in proton-proton collisions at √s = 13 TeV. The signature is expected from hard color-singlet exchange. Each of the highest transverse momentum (p(T)) jets must have p(T)(jet) > 40 GeV and pseudorapidity 1.4 0.2 GeV in the interval vertical bar eta vertical bar < 1 between the jets are observed in excess of calculations that assume only color-exchange. The fraction of events produced via color-singlet exchange, f(CSE), is measured as a function of p(T)(jet2), the pseudorapidity difference between the two leading jets, and the azimuthal angular separation between the two leading jets. The fraction f(CSE) has values of 0.4-1.0%. The results are compared with previous measurements and with predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics. In addition, the first study of jet-gap-jet events detected in association with an intact proton using a subsample of events with an integrated luminosity of 0.40 pb(-1) is presented. The intact protons are detected with the Roman pot detectors of the TOTEM experiment. The f(CSE) in this sample is 2.91 +/- 0.70(stat)(-1.01)(+1.08)(syst) times larger than that for inclusive dijet production in dijets with similar kinematics. Physical Review D, 104 (3) ISSN:0556-2821 ISSN:1550-2368 ISSN:1550-7998

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gelabert, Pere; Sawyer, Susanna; Bergström, Anders; Margaryan, Ashot; Collin, Thomas C; Meshveliani, Tengiz; Belfer-Cohen, Anna; Lordkipanidze, David; Jakeli, Nino; Matskevich, Zinovi; +11 more
    Countries: Denmark, Netherlands
    Project: EC | CSEYHP (217223), EC | AGRICON (852558)

    Summary Cave sediments have been shown to preserve ancient DNA but so far have not yielded the genome-scale information of skeletal remains. We retrieved and analyzed human and mammalian nuclear and mitochondrial environmental "shotgun" genomes from a single 25,000-year-old Upper Paleolithic sediment sample from Satsurblia cave, western Georgia:first, a human environmental genome with substantial basal Eurasian ancestry, which was an ancestral component of the majority of post-Ice Age people in the Near East, North Africa, and parts of Europe; second, a wolf environmental genome that is basal to extant Eurasian wolves and dogs and represents a previously unknown, likely extinct, Caucasian lineage; and third, a European bison environmental genome that is basal to present-day populations, suggesting that population structure has been substantially reshaped since the Last Glacial Maximum. Our results provide new insights into the Late Pleistocene genetic histories of these three species and demonstrate that direct shotgun sequencing of sediment DNA, without target enrichment methods, can yield genome-wide data informative of ancestry and phylogenetic relationships.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    George Lavrelashvili; Jean-Luc Lehners; Marc Schneider;
    Publisher: APS
    Project: EC | Qosmology (772295)

    We study a self-interacting scalar field theory coupled to gravity and are interested in spherically symmetric solutions with a regular origin surrounded by a horizon. For a scalar potential containing a barrier, and using the most general spherically symmetric ansatz, we show that in addition to the known static, oscillating solutions discussed earlier in the literature there exist new classes of solutions which appear in the strong field case. For these solutions the spatial sphere shrinks either beyond the horizon, implying a collapsing universe outside of the cosmological horizon, or it shrinks already inside of the horizon, implying the existence of a black hole surrounding the scalar lump in all directions. Crucial for the existence of all such solutions is the presence of a scalar field potential with a barrier that satisfies the swampland conjectures. 21 pages, 10 figures, v2: replaced with published version

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aaron J. Monson; Mihalis Mathioudakis; Aaron Reid; Ryan O. Milligan; David Kuridze;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: UKRI | Queen's University Belfas... (ST/P000304/1), EC | F-CHROMA (606862), UKRI | STFC Belfast 2019 DTP (ST/T506369/1), UKRI | Queen's University Belfas... (ST/T00021X/1)

    We present radiative hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares generated by the RADYN and RH codes to study the perturbations induced in photospheric Fe I lines by electron beam heating. We investigate how variations in the beam parameters result in discernible differences in the induced photospheric velocities. Line synthesis revealed a significant chromospheric contribution to the line profiles resulting in an apparent red asymmetry by as much as 40 m/s close to the time of maximum beam heating which was not reflective of the upflow velocities that arose from the radiative hydrodynamic simulations at those times. The apparent redshift to the overall line profile was produced by significant chromospheric emission that was blueshifted by as much as 400 m/s and fills in the blue side of the near stationary photospheric absorption profile. The velocity information that can be retrieved from photospheric line profiles during flares must therefore be treated with care to mitigate the effects of higher parts of the atmosphere providing an erroneous velocity signal. 14 pages, 8 figures

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . Preprint . Research . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    R. Frühwirth; Natascha Krammer; Lukas Lechner; Navid Rad; N. Van Remortel; Amandeep Kaur Kalsi; Inna Makarenko; Illia Khvastunov; Marek Niedziela; Giacomo Bruno; +233 more
    Countries: Spain, Germany, Belgium, Germany, Russian Federation, Finland, United States, Italy, Italy, United Kingdom ...
    Project: EC | AMVA4NewPhysics (675440), EC | LHCTOPVLQ (752730), EC | HIGCC (724704), EC | INSIGHTS (765710)

    The performance is presented of the reconstruction and identification algorithms for electrons and photons with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The reported results are based on proton-proton collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV and recorded in 2016–2018, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 136 fb^-1. Results obtained from lead-lead collision data collected at √(sNN)=5.02 TeV are also presented. Innovative techniques are used to reconstruct the electron and photon signals in the detector and to optimize the energy resolution. Events with electrons and photons in the final state are used to measure the energy resolution and energy scale uncertainty in the recorded events. The measured energy resolution for electrons produced in Z boson decays in proton-proton collision data ranges from 2 to 5%, depending on electron pseudorapidity and energy loss through bremsstrahlung in the detector material. The energy scale in the same range of energies is measured with an uncertainty smaller than 0.1 (0.3)% in the barrel (endcap) region in proton-proton collisions and better than 1 (3)% in the barrel (endcap) region in heavy ion collisions. The timing resolution for electrons from Z boson decays with the full 2016–2018 proton-proton collision data set is measured to be 200 ps. Individuals have received support from the Marie-Curie program and the European Research Council and Horizon 2020 Grant, contract Nos. 675440, 724704, 752730, and 765710 (European Union); the Programa de Excelencia María de Maeztu, and the Programa Severo Ochoa del Principado de Asturias CERN for the benefit of the CMS collaboration: et al. Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maxim Mai; Michael Döring; Carlos Granados; Helmut Haberzettl; Ulf-G. Meißner; D. Rönchen; I. I. Strakovsky; Ron L. Workman;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | STRONG-2020 (824093)

    Pion electroproduction off the proton is analyzed in a new framework based on a general parametrization of transition amplitudes, including constraints from gauge invariance and threshold behavior. Data with energies $1.13~{\rm GeV}

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jennifer K. Bosson; Paweł Jurek; Joseph A. Vandello; Natasza Kosakowska-Berezecka; Michał Olech; Tomasz Besta; Michael Bender; Vera Hoorens; Maja Becker; A. Timur Sevincer; +152 more
    Publisher: Sage Publications
    Countries: Denmark, Spain, Switzerland, Norway, Portugal, Netherlands, Portugal, Italy, Poland, Australia ...
    Project: EC | CIC (725128)

    The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This research was funded by a Grant from the National Science Centre in Poland (Grant Number: 2017/26/M/HS6/00360) awarded to Natasza Kosakowska-Berezecka. Data collection by the following researchers was supported by Grants as follows: Emma C. O'Connor (Grant RL5GM118963 from National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health; Angel Gomez (Grant RTI2018-093550-B-I00 from the Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Spain); Sylvie Graf and Martina Hrebickova (Grant 20-01214S from the Czech Science Foundation, and Grant RVO: 68081740 from the Institute of Psychology, Czech Academy of Sciences); Teri A. Kirby (Grant ES/S00274X/1 from the Economic and Social Research Council); Soledad de Lemus (Grant PSI2016-79971-P from Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through the excellence); Michelle K. Ryan and Renata Bongiorno (Grant ERC-2016-COG 725128 from the European Research Council awarded to Michelle K. Ryan); Marie Gustafsson Senden, Anna Lindqvist and Emma Renstrom (Grant 2017-00414 from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare); Claudio V. Torres (Grant DPI/DIRPE n. 04/2019 from the University of Brasilia). Precarious manhood beliefs portray manhood, relative to womanhood, as a social status that is hard to earn, easy to lose, and proven via public action. Whereas qualitative and ethnographic data suggest that many cultures conceptualize manhood as precarious, quantitative research has yet to demonstrate the cross-cultural consistency of precarious manhood beliefs. Here, we examined the psychometric isomorphism, or measurement invariance, of a brief precarious manhood beliefs scale (the PMB). Using data from university samples in 62 countries across 13 world regions (N=33,417), we examined: (1) the isomorphism of the PMB across individual and country levels; (2) the PMB’s distinctness from, and associations with, other cross-culturally validated gender ideologies (e.g., ambivalent sexism and ambivalence toward men; Glick & Fiske, 1996, 1999); and (3) associations of the PMB with country-level indices of gender equality (the GGGI; World Economic Forum, 2019) and human development (the HDI; United Nations Development Programme, 2019). Findings indicate that the PMB is a psychometrically valid and isomorphic index of beliefs about the male gender role that accounts for unique variance in country-level gender equality and human development. United States Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) RL5GM118963 Swedish Research Council Swedish Research Council for Health Working Life & Welfare (Forte) 2017-00414 UK Research & Innovation (UKRI) Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) ES/S00274X/1 This study was preregistered in Open Science Framework at https://osf.io/u9xfg/. Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Spain RTI2018-093550-B-I00 European Research Council (ERC) European Commission ERC-2016-COG 725128 Institute of Psychology, Czech Academy of Sciences RVO: 68081740 Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness PSI2016-79971-P National Science Center, Poland 2017/26/M/HS6/00360 Grant Agency of the Czech Republic 20-01214S University of Brasilia 04/2019

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sara Price; Carey Jewitt; Dimitri Chubinidze; Ned Barker; Nikoleta Yiannoutsou;
    Project: EC | IN-TOUCH (681489)

    Bringing touch into VR experiences through haptics is considered increasingly important for user engagement and fostering feelings of presence and immersion, yet few qualitative studies have explored users' iVR touch experiences. This paper takes an embodied approach–bringing attention to the tactile-kinaesthetic body–to explore users' wholistic experiences of touch in iVR, moving beyond the cutaneous and tactile elements of “feeling” to elaborate upon themes of movement and kinetics. Our findings show how both touch connections and disconnections emerged though material forms of tactility (the controller, body positioning, tactile expectations) and through “felt proximities” and the tactile-kinaesthetic experience thus shaping the sense of presence. The analysis shows three key factors that influence connection and disconnection, and how connection is re-navigated or sought at moments of experienced disconnection: a sense of control or agency; identity; and bridging between the material and virtual. This extended notion of touch deepens our understanding of its role in feelings of presence by providing insight into a range of factors related to notions of touch – both physical and virtual–that come into play in creating a sense of connection or presence (e.g., histories, expectations), and highlights the potential for iVR interaction to attend to the body beyond the hands in terms of touch.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yong-Hui Lin; Hans-Werner Hammer; Ulf-G. Meißner;
    Country: Germany
    Project: EC | STRONG-2020 (824093)

    Using dispersion theory with an improved description of the two-pion continuum based on the precise Roy-Steiner analysis of pion-nucleon scattering, we analyze recent data from electron-proton scattering. This allows for a high-precision determination of the electric and magnetic radius of the proton, $r_E = (0.838^{+0.005}_{-0.004}{}^{+0.004}_{-0.003})\,$fm and $r_M = (0.847\pm{0.004}\pm{0.004})\,$fm, where the first error refers to the fitting procedure using bootstrap and the data while the second one refers to the systematic uncertainty related to the underlying spectral functions. 8 pages, 2 figures, more discussions and references added, version accepted for publication in Physics Letters B

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