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106 Research products, page 1 of 11

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marc Linzmajer; Mirja Hubert; Marco Hubert;
    Countries: Denmark, Switzerland
    Project: SNSF | Every Sweet has Its Sour:... (190672)

    This research examines the neurophysiological correlates of consumers’ price memory processes. We focus on the explicit and implicit dimensions of consumers’ price knowledge and use an experimental functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study to assess how the encoding of task-dependent price memory affects the choice process and neural activation. The findings of our study add to the field of consumer neuroscience by demonstrating how neural correlates of explicit and implicit task-dependent price memory can shed light on processes that guide consumer decision-making. Over the course of our experiment we found that consumers did not always make consistent decisions, but that their decisions were influenced by explicit components of price memory. Implicit price memory components seem to have a more supportive role in the decision-making process. In summary, we found that price memory is a dynamic construct that is influenced by unconscious and neurophysiological processes, and we conclude that a neurophysiological perspective can add value for consumer and marketing research.

  • Publication . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zerbato, F.; Seiger, R.; Di Federico, G.; Burattin, A.; Barbara Weber;
    Countries: Denmark, Switzerland

    Process mining techniques rely on the availability of event logs, where events have a certain granularity that is deemed appropriate for representing business activities. In this paper, we discuss why choosing a proper granularity level during preprocessing can be challenging and reflect on the implications that such a "fixed" view over the process bears for the analysis. Then, inspired by use cases in the context of user behavior analysis, we envision possible solutions that allow exploring and mining multiple granularity levels of process activities.

  • Publication . Conference object . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Giallorenzo, Saverio; Montesi, Fabrizio; Peressotti, Marco; Richter, David; Salvaneschi, Guido; Weisenburger, Pascal;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Denmark, France, Italy, France, Switzerland

    International audience; Choreographic languages aim to express multiparty communication protocols, by providing primitives that make interaction manifest. Multitier languages enable programming computation that spans across several tiers of a distributed system, by supporting primitives that allow computation to change the location of execution. Rooted into different theoretical underpinnings-respectively process calculi and lambda calculus-the two paradigms have been investigated independently by different research communities with little or no contact. As a result, the link between the two paradigms has remained hidden for long. In this paper, we show that choreographic languages and multitier languages are surprisingly similar. We substantiate our claim by isolating the core abstractions that differentiate the two approaches and by providing algorithms that translate one into the other in a straightforward way. We believe that this work paves the way for joint research and cross-fertilisation among the two communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Henrik Jacobsen Kleven; Camille Landais; Jakob Egholt Søgaard;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: EC | ORIGENDER (841969), EC | ORIGENDER (841969)

    This paper investigates if the impact of children on the labor market trajectories of women relative to men child penalties can be explained by the biological links between mother and child. We estimate child penalties in biological and adoptive families using event studies around the arrival of children and almost forty years of adoption data from Denmark. Long-run child penalties in earnings and its underlying determinants are virtually identical in biological and adoptive families. This implies that biology is not important for child-related gender gaps. Based on additional analyses, we argue that our results speak against the importance of specialization based on comparative advantage more broadly.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    John H. Shaver; Eleanor A. Power; Benjamin Grant Purzycki; Joseph Watts; Rebecca Sear; Mary K. Shenk; Richard Sosis; Joseph Bulbulia;
    Publisher: ROYAL SOC
    Countries: Denmark, United Kingdom, Denmark

    Many aspects of religious rituals suggest they provide adaptive benefits. Studies across societies consistently find that investments in ritual behaviour return high levels of cooperation. Another line of research finds that alloparental support to mothers increases maternal fertility and improves child outcomes. Although plausible, whether religious cooperation extends to alloparenting and/or affects child development remains unclear. Using 10 years of data collected from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), we test the predictions that church attendance is positively associated with social support and fertility (n = 8207 to n = 8209), and that social support is positively associated with fertility and child development (n = 1766 to n = 6561). Results show that: (i) relative to not attending, church attendance is positively related to a woman's social network support and aid from co-religionists, (ii) aid from co-religionists is associated with increased family size, while (iii) fertility declines with extra-religious social network support. Moreover, while extra-religious social network support decreased over time, co-religionist aid remained constant. These findings suggest that religious and secular networks differ in their longevity and have divergent influences on a woman's fertility. We find some suggestive evidence that support to mothers and aid from co-religionists is positively associated with a child's cognitive ability at later stages of development. Findings provide mixed support for the premise that ritual, such as church attendance, is part of a strategy that returns high levels of support, fertility and improved child outcomes. Identifying the diversity and scope of cooperative breeding strategies across global religions presents an intriguing new horizon in the evolutionary study of religious systems. This article is part of the theme issue ‘Ritual renaissance: new insights into the most human of behaviours'. 1. Introduction (a) Cooperative support to mothers: from foragers to modern nation states 2. Methods (a) Sample and participants (b) Variables and data processing 3. Results (a) Is frequency of maternal church attendance positively associated with a mother's social network support, and/or aid from co-religionists? (b) Is the frequency of maternal church attendance positively associated with fertility? (c) Is a mother's social network support, and/or aid from co-religionists positively related to her fertility? (d) Is a mother's social network support and/or aid from co-religionists positively associated with child physiological and cognitive development? 4. Discussion (a) Limitations of the present study 5. Conclusion

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Paul Anand; Sam Jones; Matthew Donoghue; Julien O. Teitler;
    Country: United Kingdom

    Given the continuing interest in multi-dimensional approaches to poverty, the article considers ways in which Senian capability indicators can be used to assess and understand poverty and deprivation. More specifically, we develop novel capability data on 29 dimensions for adults from the US, UK and Italy to explore three core research questions. First, we show that when poverty is seen as capability deprivation, different individuals are identified as poor compared with approaches based on low income or subjective wellbeing. However, we also observe that what the poor report being able to do or otherwise is, nonetheless, it is relatively robust to the use of these three different approaches. Second, we employ latent class analysis to identify poverty and deprivation profiles for groups within society and suggest that such profiles help to identify groups who are deprived or socially excluded with respect to some but not all areas of life. Third, and finally, we examine the association between individual capability deprivation and local area deprivation in the UK. We find that individual capabilities are associated with local area deprivation in some cases but that the connections vary significantly depending on the dimension under consideration. We discuss the results and conclude by suggesting that capability indicators can provide insights into poverty which do not emerge from a more traditional approach focusing on income alone.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Niels Johannesen; Patrick Langetieg; Daniel Reck; Max Risch; Joel Slemrod;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Denmark, Denmark

    In 2008, the IRS initiated efforts to curb the use of offshore accounts to evade taxes. This paper uses administrative microdata to examine the impact of enforcement efforts on taxpayers’ reporting of offshore accounts and income. We find that enforcement caused approximately 50,000 individuals to disclose offshore accounts with a combined value of about $100 billion. Most disclosures happened outside offshore voluntary disclosure programs by individuals who never admitted prior noncompliance. Disclosed accounts were concentrated in countries often characterized as tax havens. Enforcement-driven disclosures increased annual reported capital income by $2–$4 billion, corresponding to $0.6–$1.2 billion in additional tax revenue. (JEL H24, H26, K34)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Amine Abbad Andaloussi; Francesca Zerbato; Andrea Burattin; Tijs Slaats; Thomas Hildebrandt; Barbara Weber;
    Countries: Denmark, Switzerland

    Process design artifacts have been increasingly used to guide the modeling of business processes. To support users in designing and understanding process models, different process artifacts have been combined in several ways leading to the emergence of the so-called “hybrid process artifacts”. While many hybrid artifacts have been proposed in the literature, little is known about how they can actually support users in practice. To address this gap, this work investigates the way users engage with hybrid process artifacts during comprehension tasks. In particular, we focus on a hybrid representation of DCR Graphs (DCR-HR) combining a process model, textual annotations and an interactive simulation. Following a qualitative approach, we conduct a multi-granular analysis exploiting process mining, eye-tracking techniques, and verbal data analysis to scrutinize the reading patterns and the strategies adopted by users when being confronted with DCR-HR. The findings of the coarse-grained analysis provide important insights about the behavior of domain experts and IT specialists and show how user’s background and task type change the use of hybrid process artifacts. As for the fine-grained analysis, user’s behavior was classified into goal-directed and exploratory and different strategies of using the interactive simulation were identified. In addition, a progressive switch from an exploratory behavior to a goal-directed behavior was observed. These insights pave the way for an improved development of hybrid process artifacts and delineate several directions for future work.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Taisuke Otsu; Luke Taylor;
    Country: United Kingdom

    This paper considers specification testing for regression models with errors-in-variables and proposes a test statistic comparing the distance between the parametric and nonparametric fits based on deconvolution techniques. In contrast to the method proposed by Hall and Ma (2007), our test allows general nonlinear regression models. Since our test employs the smoothing approach, it complements the nonsmoothing one by Hall and Main terms of local power properties. The other existing method, by Song (2008), is shown to possess trivial power under certain alternatives. We establish the asymptotic properties of our test statistic for the ordinary and supersmooth measurement error densities and develop a bootstrap method to approximate the critical value. We apply the test to the specification of Engel curves in the US. Finally, some simulation results endorse our theoretical findings: our test has advantages in detecting high frequency alternatives and dominates the existing tests under certain specifications.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Funda Ustek-Spilda; Davide Vega; Matteo Magnani; Luca Rossi; Irina Shklovski; Sebastian Lehuede; Alison Powell;
    Publisher: Springer
    Countries: Denmark, United Kingdom, Sweden, Denmark, Denmark, Denmark, Sweden
    Project: EC | GIFT (727040), EC | GIFT (727040)

    AbstractWe present a methodology integrating social media data, data from qualitative research and network analysis. Qualitative insights gained from ethnographic fieldwork are used to collect and annotate social network data, and social media data is used as part of the ethnography to identify relevant actors and topics. The methodology is presented in the context of an analysis of the Internet of Things in the European context.

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