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38 Research products, page 1 of 4

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  • Ghent University Academic Bibliography

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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Destrooper, Tine; Herremans, Brigitte;
    Publisher: Justice Visions Research Group Ghent University
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | VictPart (804154)

    Syrian NGOs and victim groups are increasingly turning to transitional justice initiatives such as truth-seeking, to address pressing justice needs. Truth-seeking is particularly relevant in the Syrian context because of the ongoing impunity but also because of the memory of past atrocities such as the Hama massacre in 1982. In the absence of an official truth-seeking mechanism, informal truth practices are of paramount importance.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Destrooper, Tine; Herremans, Brigitte;
    Publisher: Justice Visions Research Group Ghent University
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | VictPart (804154)

    Syrian victim and survivor groups have been increasingly active in informal transitional justice processes. They assert their political agency and demonstrate that survivors and victims are the key stakeholders in justice initiatives. This episode zooms in on the origin of victims’ activism and some main break-throughs.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access Dutch; Flemish
    Authors: 
    Loccufier, Eva; Becelaere, Jana;
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | POLYBIOSKIN (745839)
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Destrooper, Tine; Herremans, Brigitte;
    Publisher: Justice Visions Research Group Ghent University
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | VictPart (804154)

    As a central institution of the Assad’s regime’s system of governance, the prison is aimed at destroying political subjects in Syria. Mass imprisonment has a devastating impact on Syrian society.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Destrooper, Tine; Herremans, Brigitte;
    Publisher: Justice Visions Research Group Ghent University
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | VictPart (804154)

    In this new episode of this mini-series on justice efforts for Syrians by Justice Visions and Impunity Watch, we critically examine criminal accountability efforts. Since the start of the al-Khatib trial in April 2020, the first one involving Syrian state torture, criminal proceedings have dominated the justice debate. Patrick Krocker (ECCHR), Anwar al-Bunni (SCLSR), and Veronica Bellintani (SDLP) shed light on the impact of criminal accountability, the central role of victims, and the need to complement criminal proceedings by other efforts.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yogendran, Sangeetha; Destrooper, Tine;
    Publisher: Justice Visions Research Group Ghent University
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | VictPart (804154)

    Sri Lanka’s present is haunted by memories of the island’s decades-long civil war, which ended just over a decade ago. The war was mainly a clash between the Sinhalese-dominated Sri Lankan government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) insurgent group, the latter of which had hoped to establish a separate state for the Tamil minority. Although the Civil War ended in 2009, the current situation in Sri Lanka has only partially improved. A large portion of the Tamil population remains displaced. While there are fewer political and civil rights issues, instances of torture and enforced disappearances persist even in recent years. The Sri Lankan military still occupies predominantly Tamil areas designated as “high-security zones,” though to a lesser extent than during the war. The entrenched impunity for the deaths of tens of thousands of Tamil civilians in the final stages of the war in late 2008 and 2009 in what the United Nations called a “bloodbath”, remains unaccounted for. In January this year, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) released a damning report on the human rights situation in Sri Lanka. The report tracks Sri Lanka’s current, deteriorating human rights situation, identifying developments that “risk the recurrence of… the grave violations of the past.” In March, the HRC adopted a new resolution on Sri Lanka, ramping up international monitoring and scrutiny of the human rights situation in Sri Lanka, and the new resolution also mandates the UN human rights office to collect, consolidate and preserve evidence for future prosecutions and make recommendations to the international community on steps they can make to deliver on justice and accountability. In this episode, Tine Destrooper and Sangeetha Yogendran speak with Archana Ravichandradeva, a Canadian lawyer and Senior Advocacy Officer with PEARL, People for Equality and Relief in Lanka, a women-led NGO concerned about the situation in Sri Lanka. In her role at PEARL, she works to build connections with government officials to advocate for justice and accountability on the island. We discuss accountability and transitional justice efforts in Sri Lanka, and in light of developments before the Human Rights Council.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Destrooper, Tine; Mejia Bonifazi, Gretel;
    Publisher: Justice Visions Research Group Ghent University
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | VictPart (804154)

    In July 2020, President Alejandro Giammattei issued a series of decrees closing down several institutions created to comply with the Peace Accords signed by the Guatemalan State in 1996. One of these decrees: a) closes the Peace Secretariat (SEPAZ), an institution tasked with managing the National Program of Reparations (PNR) for the victims of the armed conflict, and b) orders the transfer of the PNR to the Ministry of Social Development. Neither victims nor civil society organizations were included in the decision-making process that went behind these decrees. Several legal actions have been filed by victims and civil society to abrogate them. In this episode, Tine Destrooper and Gretel Mejía talk to Rocío Herrera, a Guatemalan human rights lawyer working at the Human Rights Law Firm, a Guatemalan NGO that provides legal support in one of these actions. She addresses the implications of the decrees on victims’ access to an adequate, effective, and integral reparation, and on the realities of working with victim communities in pandemic times. Rocío highlights the resilience of Guatemalan people and talks about other intersecting topics, such as the role of strategic litigation to overcome setbacks to transitional justice, and how actors, such as academic centres, can contribute to these interventions. Amicus curiae briefs are examples of these strategies, which explain human rights standards and obligations to the court.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Van Poeck, Katrien; Bigaré, Nordin; Östman, Leif Olov;
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | SEAS (824522)
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mejia Bonifazi, Gretel; Evrard, Elke; Destrooper, Tine;
    Publisher: Justice Visions Research Group Ghent University
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | VictPart (804154)

    What do we mean when we talk about victim participation? How do we conceptualize the notion of participation in transitional justice so we can study or even evaluate it? In this episode, Justice Visions colleagues Gretel Mejía Bonifazi and Elke Evrard address these theoretical questions and connect them to the struggle of the COCOP community, an Ixil community in the Guatemalan Highlands seeking truth, justice, and redress for a state-led massacre during the armed conflict. First, we outline why an actor-oriented approach is needed to shed light on the participatory ‘trajectories’ of survivors throughout an ‘ecosystem’ of transitional justice spaces and moments. Then, our interviewees Juan Cobo Brito and Juana Santiago Cedillo share reflections on their own participation trajectory, drawing our attention to the importance of exploring participants’ identities and interests, the different spaces they navigate, and the temporalities of participation, and alternative ways of thinking about impact or outcomes.

  • Open Access Spanish; Castilian
    Authors: 
    Destrooper, Tine;
    Publisher: Justice Visions Research Group Ghent University
    Country: Belgium
    Project: EC | VictPart (804154)

    In 2015 terror attacks against Charlie Hebdo and in a Jewish supermarket paralyzed Paris. All three attackers were killed in standoffs with the police on 9 January 2015. Five years later, during an emotional three-month trial, victims were given a venue to share their testimonies as civil parties. The trial resulted in guilty verdicts against all 14 accused. In this episode, we examine whether it makes sense to look at these trials through the lens of transitional justice and how doing so allows for lesson learning and for organizing the upcoming Bataclan and Nice trials in a more appropriate way. Our interviewees in this episode, Kerstin Bree Carlson and Sharon Weill argue that one of the most remarkable things about this trial was that it worked like two processes running in parallel, barely connected, in what they argue was “a platform for the victims, but a weak criminal case”. During the “truth commission” element of the trial, victims recounted the horrors of the attacks. The criminal responsibility element of the trial, on the contrary, seemed to be much less linked to these events, with those on trial being markedly far removed from the facts recounted by the victims. This offers a warning for future terror trials, but also suggests that there may be things to learn from the domain of transitional justice where both criminal justice, truth-telling, and accountability also have to be navigated in complex settings. How can experiences from the domain of transitional justice help consolidated democracies to better deal with terror attacks and other societal challenges they are facing? And what does it mean for the domain of transitional justice to include these aparadigmatic cases?

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