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73 Research products, page 1 of 8

  • Research data
  • 2018-2022
  • IT
  • COVID-19

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    GRABBE, Heather; HEMERIJCK, Anton; STOLLE, Dietlind;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    This contribution was delivered on 5 May 2022 on the occasion of the hybrid 2022 edition of EUI State of the Union on ‘A Europe fit for the next generation?' The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, efforts to combat climate change and now the latest geopolitical threat of the War on Ukraine has exacerbated important cleavages within and between European nation states. How resilient are European welfare states? How strong is solidarity amongst European nation states? Can we meet the longer-term geopolitical, energy and climate challenges, as well as threats to democratic governance and the possible end of the liberal order? We take up these questions by reporting on current research on the resilience of European welfare states and the state of solidarity in Europe as reflected in the latest 2022 Edition of the EUI-YouGov Survey.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    ALOISI, Antonio;
    Publisher: IE
    Country: Italy

    Available online January 10, 2022 The Covid-19 pandemic has seen a startling digital acceleration, but how has this impacted power dynamics in the workplace? Professor Antonio Aloisi of IE Law School uses his research to analyze the use of new tools and techniques in worker surveillance. The paper, conducted with Valerio De Stefano, entitled “Essential jobs, remote work and digital surveillance. Addressing the Covid-19 pandemic panopticon” is to be published in the International Labour Review, and has been conducted within the framework of the “Boss Ex Machina” project, which has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 893888.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    GOETZ, Walter; MAZZOLA, Alberto; TARTAGLIA, Mario;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    This contribution was delivered on 5 May 2022 on the occasion of the hybrid 2022 edition of EUI State of the Union on ‘A Europe fit for the next generation?' The European Union’s stimulus package and the Recovery and Resilience Facility are seen as key tools in aiding the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. As the transport sector suffered a particularly hard hit, it subsequently needs comparatively more support than other sectors. Such support constitutes a unique opportunity to accelerate its much-needed transition to decarbonisation, a process that will rely on increasing the transport sector’s level of digitalisation. Among all modes of transport, it appears to be best positioned to deliver on the EU’s decarbonization objectives, especially because it can facilitate the modal shift from road and short-haul air transport. The objective of this panel is to discuss how the stimulus package can accelerate the decarbonisation of transport with railways playing a central role in the process.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    BOHLE, Dorothee;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    9 data files, 1 codebook The East Central Europe Covid-19 Monitor database provides an overview of main policy measures adopted in East Central Europe as a response to the pandemic during the first and second waves of the COVID-19 crisis, with a special focus on social policies, labour market, industrial, trade and investment measures, and monetary and fiscal policies. It covers the following countries: Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Romania.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    VERHULST, Stefaan; MARTÍN, Ángel; KÄÄRIÄINEN, Teemu; KHAN, Ronny; FILIPPONI, Silvana; CALVARESI, Mirko;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    This contribution was delivered on 5 May 2022 on the occasion of the hybrid 2022 edition of EUI State of the Union on ‘A Europe fit for the next generation?' EU Member States have adopted several initiatives to establish a legal and technical framework for digital identity. The European Commission has facilitated this development by offering guidance and promoting interoperable solutions through frameworks such as eIDAS and solutions developed within the European Interoperability Framework. At the same time, two years of COVID-19 pandemic have led at once to an acceleration of digital identity projects, and mounting concerns that widespread data collection and availability can lead to the risk of privacy violations, citizen profiling and mass surveillance. This session will explore the opportunities and challenges of emerging digital identity and digital payments, including the privacy, security concerns as well as the outstanding opportunities for inclusive growth, resilient and sustainable solutions for the society of the future. The discussion will also cover emerging attempts to develop joint European solutions for digital identity, including the recent joint declaration between the governments of Finland and Germany to support the progress of the proposed regulation on European digital identity, and to accelerate the development of joint European solutions based on digital identity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    KENNEDY, Jonathan;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    Lecture given online on 18 May 2021 The workshop 'Turning the Tide: Contemporary Challenges to Health and Healthcare in Europe and Beyond' is organized as a series of 5 lectures with renowned speakers who have worked on the topic of health and healthcare from different angles, with the Max Weber Fellows acting as moderators in 2021. Vaccines and vaccination programmes are amongst the most remarkable achievements of, respectively, medical science and public health. Even though vaccines provide the only clear path out of the death and devastation caused by Covid-19, a significant minority of people in Western Europe and the North America have said they will not get vaccinated. There is a strong association between voting for anti-establishment political parties and vaccine hesitancy. This talk argues that support for populist politicians and low vaccine confidence are driven by similar dynamics: a profound distrust in elites and experts. Public health actors traditionally aim to improve vaccine uptake by raising awareness about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines. There are limits to this strategy, however. The distrust of elites and experts that is driving vaccine hesitancy will be difficult to resolve unless its underlying causes—i.e., political disenfranchisement and economic marginalisation—are also addressed.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    FINGER, Matthias; GOETZ, Walter; KARJALAINEN, Piia; MAZZOLA, Alberto;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    This contribution was delivered online on 6 May 2021 on the occasion of the hybrid 2021 edition of EUI State of the Union on ‘Europe in a Changing World '. Part of the #SoU2021 Fringe Events, this panel, organised by SoU’s Partners and Stakeholders [EUI Florence School of Regulation], contributed with an alternative intellectually independent perspective to the overarching theme ‘Europe in a Changing World’. The European Green Deal strives to transform Europe into the world’s first carbon neutral continent by 2050. This commitment places a particular responsibility on the transport sector, which accounts for a quarter of the EU’s total greenhouse gas emissions. While a combination of measures will have to be considered, this panel explores the role of modal shift in placing the transport sector on a firm path to sustainable and smart mobility. The EU’s modal shift strategy sets out that rail freight traffic should increase by 50% by 2030 and double by 2050, whereas transport by inland waterways and short sea shipping should increase by 25% by 2030 and by 50% by 2050. To advance the delivery of these objectives, the Commission has declared 2021 as the European Year of Rail. What measures should be implemented to better manage and increase the capacity of railways and inland waterways? While COVID-19 has brought to light more prominently the higher safety and reliability of rail freight, which in turn, has provided efficient cross-border cargo connections carrying large volumes of essential goods using minimal human resources, how can we sustain this improved performance into the post-COVID-19 period? Can the COVID-19 aftermath be transformed into an opportunity for railway undertakings to tap into unused potential and develop more rail passenger services, especially in cross-border contexts? What are the technical and regulatory barriers, as well as the possible solutions and legislative opportunities to turn the EU’s modal shift objectives into reality?

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    BALDWIN, Richard; BRETON, Thrierry;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    This contribution was delivered online on 7 May 2021 on the occasion of the hybrid 2021 edition of EUI State of the Union on ‘Europe in a Changing World'. The development of complex and dense global value chains has represented the main characteristic of 21st industry globalisation, linking global firms, production, trade, investment with consumers in what has increasingly seemed like a borderless world. The COVID-19 pandemic has, however, disrupted and put into question this global value chains paradigm. Will “just in time” be replaced by “just in case”? Should the EU be repatriating production of critical activities and services? What does this imply for international trade and global governance?

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    EVENETT, Simon; FREUND, Caroline; REGIBEAU, Pierre;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    This contribution was delivered online on 6 May 2021 on the occasion of the hybrid 2021 edition of EUI State of the Union on ‘Europe in a Changing World'. Since the Global Financial Crisis in 2008, G20 countries have relied extensively on a variety of tax-subsidy instruments to support domestic firms and sectors. COVID-19 has led to a further increase in subsidisation. Spillovers associated with subsidy programmes and the behaviour of state-owned or state-controlled enterprises have become a major source of trade tension. This panel will discuss options for managing the competitive effects of subsidies in and outside the World Trade Organization.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    KERR, Suzi; MAOSHENG, Duan; POLLARD, Vicky;
    Publisher: European University Institute
    Country: Italy

    This contribution was delivered online on 6 May 2021 on the occasion of the hybrid 2021 edition of EUI State of the Union on ‘Europe in a Changing World '. Part of the #SoU2021 Fringe Events, this panel, organised by SoU’s Partners and Stakeholders [EUI European University Institute, EAERE European Association of Environmental and Resource Economics], contributed with an alternative intellectually independent perspective to the overarching theme ‘Europe in a Changing World’. The European Union (EU) committed to reach climate neutrality by 2050. This ambitious target remains a top priority for the Commission despite the COVID-19 crisis and is shared by other jurisdictions, such as USA and China (the latter by 2060). The EU intends to play a key role in the global climate challenge. While a unilateral action will not be sufficient to stop global warming (as EU emits only a small part of world emissions), the EU can lead the world by example in adopting stringent climate regulations and hence influencing the others’ climate policies. However, alternative climate policies might emerge in the world challenging the EU leadership in the fight against climate change. For instance, the EU Emission Trading System (ETS) was a prototype for most ETSs in the world. But ETSs might diverge over time rather than converge towards a unique model to account for the different institutional frameworks. The same applies to other climate policies that might or not fit other institutional contexts.The panel session will discuss how the EU and other countries can learn from their own experiences to coordinate climate policies, focusing on how cooperation between ETSs can support a coherent global climate policy.The event continues the policy dialogue between academia and the policy world carried out by FSR Climate at State of the Union since 2018, together with the Policy Outreach Committee of EAERE and the STG. It is organised under the LIFE DICET project, which focuses on international carbon market cooperation.

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