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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrews, S; Duggan, P;
    Publisher: Emergency Planning Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    This Toolkit is a direct outcome of the research project ‘Social Distancing and Reimagining City Life: Performative strategies and practices for response and recovery in and beyond lockdown’ (AH/V013734/1). Available at the Emergency Planning Society website: https://the-eps.org/toolkit/. Personal debriefing is critical to emergency planning. In this Toolkit, we introduce creative strategies that offer new methods of engaging in personal debriefing, both for individuals and to support team approaches. We start from understanding emergency planning ‘as’ performance (as explored at our EPS Huddle, 30th March 2022 and in publications) to introduce and investigate performance processes as creative, flexible, and dynamic strategies for personal debriefing. Too often, creative practice is understood through finished artworks or performances, yet many of the processes that arts practitioners use in making work offer creative, individually-nuanced ways of making sense of events or situations. The Toolkit offers a range of strategies for personal debriefing that we have developed through our work with emergency and resilience planning professionals in the UK and USA. Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of the UK Research and Innovation’s Covid-19 Rapid Response call.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sheeha, Iman;
    Publisher: Medieval and Early Modern Orients
    Country: United Kingdom

    AHRC-funded project Moorish maidservants on the early modern stage are almost invariably depicted as evil, lustful, and promiscuous. Arts and Humanities Research Council

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Green, D;
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    ProjektDEAL.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Forde, L;
    Publisher: Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Probation
    Country: United Kingdom

    The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the policy position of HM Inspectorate of Probation. © Crown copyright 2022. You may re-use this information (excluding logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. This report was kindly produced by Dr Louise Forde, examining international children’s rights and how they can be adequately realised for children who come into contact with the youth justice system. While there is no ‘silver bullet’ to developing a rights-compliant system, five key criteria are set out, encompassing children’s reintegration, dignity and wellbeing, a prioritisation of diversion, the incorporation of legal safeguards, and a focus upon implementation and operation. A polarisation of considerations relating to welfare or justice is seen as unhelpful; to secure and uphold children’s rights, there needs to be protection for both (i) children’s legal and procedural rights and (ii) their wellbeing and developmental needs. More generally, explicit commitment to realising children’s rights is required. Within the inspectorate, we will continue to review the alignment of our inspection frameworks to international standards and the latest evidence underpinning high-quality services. Dr Robin Moore Head of Research 10.13039/501100002081 Irish Research Council, “Welfare” and “justice” in Irish youth justice: Punishing children or meeting their needs?

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Colaco, HMJ;
    Publisher: European Financial Management Association
    Country: United Kingdom

    Copyright © 2022 The Author. Using a difference-in-differences framework, I examine the impact of the 2012 Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act on underwriter network centrality as measured by Degree, Betweenness, Closeness, and Eigenvector. The Act has resulted in greater information asymmetry which suggests a greater role for underwriter centrality. However, the desire to avoid collaboration coupled with greater efficiency in underwriter hiring after the Act point to a reduced role for underwriter centrality. Which effect dominates? Using a sample of US IPOs from 2001 to 2019 I find that Degree, Closeness, and Eigenvector have reduced for emerging growth companies (EGCs) following the Act. However, there is no impact on Betweenness. My results are robust to measuring centrality over different periods and various specifications including propensity score matching. I also find that the proportion of IPO co-managers and co-manager shares relative to the entire underwriting syn dicate has reduced following the Act. Finally, my results show that, after the Act, a co-manager on the IPO is not likely to become a book manager in the first SEO.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    John, P; McAndrews, J; Loewen, PJ; Banerjee, S; Savani, M; Koenig, R; Nyhan, B; Lee-Whiting, B;
    Publisher: The British Academy
    Country: United Kingdom

    Copyright © The authors. Overcoming Barriers to Vaccination By Empowering Citizens to Make Deliberate Choices is one of ten in-depth transatlantic reports published by The British Academy exploring COVID-19 vaccine engagement in the UK and the US. For more details, see: https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/news/the-british-academy-publishes-studies-examining-covid-vaccine-engagement-in-uk-and-usa/. British Academy (COVG7210005); Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/news/the-british-academy-publishes-studies-examining-covid-vaccine-engagement-in-uk-and-usa/

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ofosu, G; Sarpong, D;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom

    Formalization of the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector has come to dominate discourse on mineral exhaustion, livelihoods, and persistence of vulnerabilities in ASM settings. Often touted as a panacea to curbing the excesses of informal mining operations, the call for the formalization of ASM operations continue unabated. In this paper, we explore how the operations and management practices in the growing formal ASM sector get formulated and (re)negotiated in practice. We develop our contribution in the context of a formalised small-scale mining operator in Ghana, focusing on its organizing practices and operational outcomes within the contingencies of organizing to explicate how livelihoods and vulnerabilities persisting in ASM settings gets identified and labelled in practice. Data for our inquiry comes from ethnographic interviews with management and staff. Our findings in emphasizing, but also nuancing, what has come to be known as the ‘mineral-exhaustion-vulnerabilities’, provides insights into how the organizing practices induced by formalization cohere to support socio-economic and environmental mitigation efforts. We note that the persistence of vulnerabilities, rather than the lack of mitigation mechanisms, is largely influenced by profligacy and the incipient lack of investment culture. We conclude by highlighting the need for sustainability mechanisms, based on exit strategies for ASM operators, to tie in with comprehensive policies and lessons on income diversification and investment.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Aslan Ozgul, B; Ozduzen, O; Ferenczi, N; Karduni, A; Ianosev, B; Dou, W; Adams, M; Fratczak, M;
    Publisher: The British Academy
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funded by the British Academy, this report is part of a research project entitled “Mapping and visualising intersections of social inequalities, community mistrust, and vaccine hesitancy in online and physical spaces in the UK and US”. The report investigates social, cultural, and political factors underlying vaccine hesitant beliefs and ideas among minoritised communities in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (US). The data is collected through interviews and focus groups with vaccine-hesitant individuals within various religiously, ethnically, and racially minoritised communities, interviews with medical practitioners, and through thematic analysis of vaccine communication in Twitter and Telegram during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Corsini, L; Ceschin, F;
    Publisher: Brunel Design for Sustainability Research Group
    Country: United Kingdom

    17th March 2022. Roundtable hosted by Policy Connect, the All-Party Sustainable Resource Group (APSRG) and Brunel University London. Topic: the role of reusable and refillable packaging solutions, to move the UK to a circular economy. Participants: parliamentarians, decision-makers, as well as representatives from industry, academia and the third sector. Policy Connect produced this document as a post-event write-up with contribution from Brunel University London. While it was informed by the roundtable discussion, it does not necessarily represent the view of all those in attendance or Policy Connect. The event and the write-up was kindly sponsored by the Public Engagement Fund of Brunel University London. Public Engagement Fund of Brunel University London.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Premkumar, P; Kumari, V;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom

    Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Rejection sensitivity (RS) is the expectation of being distanced from and excluded by others, and found to be positively associated with both schizotypal personality traits and aggression. Here, we propose different explanations for these associations. Specifically, we suggest that disorganisation and social anxiety explain RS in schizotypy, but anger and the need for reward from retaliation and mood repair explain RS in aggression. There is some support for our suggestions from recent studies showing neural activity and/or connectivity patterns during social rejection that indicate deficient emotional regulation and anxiety in schizotypy, but heightened social pain and retaliation in relation to aggression. Further research needs to firmly establish how RS, schizotypy and aggression might exist, or co-exist, at the behavioural and brain levels, and whether interventions that specifically target social anxiety, maladaptive emotion regulation, or promote prosocial behaviours could be employed to normalise RS in the context of schizotypy and/or aggression. Funding: This work did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
3,152 Research products, page 1 of 316
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrews, S; Duggan, P;
    Publisher: Emergency Planning Society
    Country: United Kingdom

    This Toolkit is a direct outcome of the research project ‘Social Distancing and Reimagining City Life: Performative strategies and practices for response and recovery in and beyond lockdown’ (AH/V013734/1). Available at the Emergency Planning Society website: https://the-eps.org/toolkit/. Personal debriefing is critical to emergency planning. In this Toolkit, we introduce creative strategies that offer new methods of engaging in personal debriefing, both for individuals and to support team approaches. We start from understanding emergency planning ‘as’ performance (as explored at our EPS Huddle, 30th March 2022 and in publications) to introduce and investigate performance processes as creative, flexible, and dynamic strategies for personal debriefing. Too often, creative practice is understood through finished artworks or performances, yet many of the processes that arts practitioners use in making work offer creative, individually-nuanced ways of making sense of events or situations. The Toolkit offers a range of strategies for personal debriefing that we have developed through our work with emergency and resilience planning professionals in the UK and USA. Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of the UK Research and Innovation’s Covid-19 Rapid Response call.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sheeha, Iman;
    Publisher: Medieval and Early Modern Orients
    Country: United Kingdom

    AHRC-funded project Moorish maidservants on the early modern stage are almost invariably depicted as evil, lustful, and promiscuous. Arts and Humanities Research Council

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Green, D;
    Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    ProjektDEAL.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Forde, L;
    Publisher: Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Probation
    Country: United Kingdom

    The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the policy position of HM Inspectorate of Probation. © Crown copyright 2022. You may re-use this information (excluding logos) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. This report was kindly produced by Dr Louise Forde, examining international children’s rights and how they can be adequately realised for children who come into contact with the youth justice system. While there is no ‘silver bullet’ to developing a rights-compliant system, five key criteria are set out, encompassing children’s reintegration, dignity and wellbeing, a prioritisation of diversion, the incorporation of legal safeguards, and a focus upon implementation and operation. A polarisation of considerations relating to welfare or justice is seen as unhelpful; to secure and uphold children’s rights, there needs to be protection for both (i) children’s legal and procedural rights and (ii) their wellbeing and developmental needs. More generally, explicit commitment to realising children’s rights is required. Within the inspectorate, we will continue to review the alignment of our inspection frameworks to international standards and the latest evidence underpinning high-quality services. Dr Robin Moore Head of Research 10.13039/501100002081 Irish Research Council, “Welfare” and “justice” in Irish youth justice: Punishing children or meeting their needs?

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Colaco, HMJ;
    Publisher: European Financial Management Association
    Country: United Kingdom

    Copyright © 2022 The Author. Using a difference-in-differences framework, I examine the impact of the 2012 Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act on underwriter network centrality as measured by Degree, Betweenness, Closeness, and Eigenvector. The Act has resulted in greater information asymmetry which suggests a greater role for underwriter centrality. However, the desire to avoid collaboration coupled with greater efficiency in underwriter hiring after the Act point to a reduced role for underwriter centrality. Which effect dominates? Using a sample of US IPOs from 2001 to 2019 I find that Degree, Closeness, and Eigenvector have reduced for emerging growth companies (EGCs) following the Act. However, there is no impact on Betweenness. My results are robust to measuring centrality over different periods and various specifications including propensity score matching. I also find that the proportion of IPO co-managers and co-manager shares relative to the entire underwriting syn dicate has reduced following the Act. Finally, my results show that, after the Act, a co-manager on the IPO is not likely to become a book manager in the first SEO.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    John, P; McAndrews, J; Loewen, PJ; Banerjee, S; Savani, M; Koenig, R; Nyhan, B; Lee-Whiting, B;
    Publisher: The British Academy
    Country: United Kingdom

    Copyright © The authors. Overcoming Barriers to Vaccination By Empowering Citizens to Make Deliberate Choices is one of ten in-depth transatlantic reports published by The British Academy exploring COVID-19 vaccine engagement in the UK and the US. For more details, see: https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/news/the-british-academy-publishes-studies-examining-covid-vaccine-engagement-in-uk-and-usa/. British Academy (COVG7210005); Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. https://www.thebritishacademy.ac.uk/news/the-british-academy-publishes-studies-examining-covid-vaccine-engagement-in-uk-and-usa/

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Ofosu, G; Sarpong, D;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom

    Formalization of the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector has come to dominate discourse on mineral exhaustion, livelihoods, and persistence of vulnerabilities in ASM settings. Often touted as a panacea to curbing the excesses of informal mining operations, the call for the formalization of ASM operations continue unabated. In this paper, we explore how the operations and management practices in the growing formal ASM sector get formulated and (re)negotiated in practice. We develop our contribution in the context of a formalised small-scale mining operator in Ghana, focusing on its organizing practices and operational outcomes within the contingencies of organizing to explicate how livelihoods and vulnerabilities persisting in ASM settings gets identified and labelled in practice. Data for our inquiry comes from ethnographic interviews with management and staff. Our findings in emphasizing, but also nuancing, what has come to be known as the ‘mineral-exhaustion-vulnerabilities’, provides insights into how the organizing practices induced by formalization cohere to support socio-economic and environmental mitigation efforts. We note that the persistence of vulnerabilities, rather than the lack of mitigation mechanisms, is largely influenced by profligacy and the incipient lack of investment culture. We conclude by highlighting the need for sustainability mechanisms, based on exit strategies for ASM operators, to tie in with comprehensive policies and lessons on income diversification and investment.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Aslan Ozgul, B; Ozduzen, O; Ferenczi, N; Karduni, A; Ianosev, B; Dou, W; Adams, M; Fratczak, M;
    Publisher: The British Academy
    Country: United Kingdom

    Funded by the British Academy, this report is part of a research project entitled “Mapping and visualising intersections of social inequalities, community mistrust, and vaccine hesitancy in online and physical spaces in the UK and US”. The report investigates social, cultural, and political factors underlying vaccine hesitant beliefs and ideas among minoritised communities in the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States of America (US). The data is collected through interviews and focus groups with vaccine-hesitant individuals within various religiously, ethnically, and racially minoritised communities, interviews with medical practitioners, and through thematic analysis of vaccine communication in Twitter and Telegram during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Corsini, L; Ceschin, F;
    Publisher: Brunel Design for Sustainability Research Group
    Country: United Kingdom

    17th March 2022. Roundtable hosted by Policy Connect, the All-Party Sustainable Resource Group (APSRG) and Brunel University London. Topic: the role of reusable and refillable packaging solutions, to move the UK to a circular economy. Participants: parliamentarians, decision-makers, as well as representatives from industry, academia and the third sector. Policy Connect produced this document as a post-event write-up with contribution from Brunel University London. While it was informed by the roundtable discussion, it does not necessarily represent the view of all those in attendance or Policy Connect. The event and the write-up was kindly sponsored by the Public Engagement Fund of Brunel University London. Public Engagement Fund of Brunel University London.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Premkumar, P; Kumari, V;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom

    Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Rejection sensitivity (RS) is the expectation of being distanced from and excluded by others, and found to be positively associated with both schizotypal personality traits and aggression. Here, we propose different explanations for these associations. Specifically, we suggest that disorganisation and social anxiety explain RS in schizotypy, but anger and the need for reward from retaliation and mood repair explain RS in aggression. There is some support for our suggestions from recent studies showing neural activity and/or connectivity patterns during social rejection that indicate deficient emotional regulation and anxiety in schizotypy, but heightened social pain and retaliation in relation to aggression. Further research needs to firmly establish how RS, schizotypy and aggression might exist, or co-exist, at the behavioural and brain levels, and whether interventions that specifically target social anxiety, maladaptive emotion regulation, or promote prosocial behaviours could be employed to normalise RS in the context of schizotypy and/or aggression. Funding: This work did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

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