Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
738 Research products, page 1 of 74

  • Research data
  • Other research products
  • English
  • Elpub digital library

10
arrow_drop_down
Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    B. Ghavimi; P. Mayr; S. Vahdati; C. Lange;
    Country: Germany

    Scientific full text papers are usually stored in separate places than their underlying research datasets. Authors typically make references to datasets by mentioning them for example by using their titles and the year of publication. However, in most cases explicit links that would provide readers with direct access to referenced datasets are missing. Manually detecting references to datasets in papers is time consuming and requires an expert in the domain of the paper. In order to make explicit all links to datasets in papers that have been published already, we suggest and evaluate a semi- automatic approach for finding references to datasets in social sciences papers. Our approach does not need a corpus of papers (no cold start problem) and it performs well on a small test corpus (gold standard). Our approach achieved an F- measure of 0.84 for identifying references in full texts and an F- measure of 0.83 for finding correct matches of detected references in the da vertical bar ra dataset registry.

  • Other research product . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    H. Heikkilä;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    The success and mainstreaming of e-books is transforming not only the traditional/Gutenbergian idea of the book but also the previous idea of an e-book as mainly an enriched print book. In the new e-book concept, the nature of a book as an artifact is diminishing and disposition as a networked interface to the knowledge is rising. One of the most important emerging concepts is the social reading, which means reading acts while connected to the other people. Social reading is a new and not very well defined area of reading practices. In addition to the traditional reading together and discussing books person to person, social reading includes a large number of networked functions like sharing and receiving shared information. Research of this new phenomena is almost non existent, yet it is expected to be the next big thing in reading and in e-books. This study provides an overview of the history of social reading of printed books and then defines parallel features in the new digital reading activities. Research material consists of popular e-book software and services. The proposed categorization of social reading is based on content analysis of properties that were found in those services. This report claims that social reading functionalities are manifestations of the social needs that have existed during and even before the paper book; digital time enables re-emerging of some of those features, but in a different manner.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    C. Clivaz; M. Rivoal; M. Sankar;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    The eTalks are a new digital multimedia editing plaform developed at the University of Lausanne: their application is implemented via an easy-to-use editor interface, designed for the use of researchers themselves, to create and edit original eTalks. This permits the linking together of images, sounds and textual materials with hyperlinks, enriching it with relevant information. The final release of eTalks allows complete ‘citability’ of its contents: each and every portion of the researchers' talks can be precisely referred to and thus cited with a specific identifier, just like any traditional, paper-based scientific publication but with all the potential for plural literacies. It is openly accessible and the code is open source, including guidelines to install the eTalks. It contributes to the development of multiliteracies in the digital academic production of knowledge.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    M. Duke;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    The Patients Participate! project explored the feasibility of a citizen science approach to writing lay summaries for research articles. It involved a range stakeholders: funders of research (medical charities), service providers (the British Library), researchers and patients. Informed by practices within medical charities and the experiences of other citizen science projects, different methods were used to investigate trust, the skills required to produce a good lay summary, and the benefits of citizen science. A literature review into human factors was carried out and platforms for service delivery were analysed. The project was able to synthesise guidelines on participation in citizen science projects and the writing of lay summaries, and to identify challenges. This paper summarises the outcomes and lessons learned.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    C. Martin; V. Pagneux; A. Henaut;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    How may we best evaluate an open access e-journal that is not intended to be cited in rank “A” scientific journals? In this study, we took the example of a journal that connects research and professionals workers in the environmental sciences. We compared information from downloads with readership surveys. The main finding was that readers remember the best articles from a given issue and classify the issues based on this memory. A clear dichotomy can be observed: some readers are particularly interested in the management of biodiversity and pollution and others reject all that links to it.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    B. Schmidt; M. Dobreva;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    Research and scholarly communication is increasingly seen in the light of open science, making research processes and results more accessible and collaborative. This brings with it the chance to better connect research and society by introducing new avenues for engagement with citizens. This book presents the proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Electronic Publishing (Elpub), held in Valetta, Malta, in September 2015. This year’s conference explores the interplay of two dimensions of electronic publishing – the ever growing volume of digital collections and the improved understanding of the widest user group, citizens. This exciting theme encompasses human, cultural, economic, social, technological, legal, policy-related, commercial, and other relevant aspects. Echoing the conference agenda, the book covers a wide range of topics, including engagement with citizens and professionals, enhanced publishing and new paradigms, discovery and digital libraries, open access and open science, as well as the use and reuse of data. Addressing the most recent developments in these areas, the book will be of interest to practitioners, researchers and students in information science, as well as users of electronic publishing.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    C. Handke; L. Guibault; J.J. Vallbé;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    With the diffusion of digital information technology, data mining (DM) is widely expected to increase the productivity of all kinds of research activities. Based on bibliometric data, we demonstrate that the share of DM-related research articles in all published academic papers has increased substantially over the last two decades. We develop an ordinal categorization of countries according to essential aspects of the copyright system affecting the costs and benefits of DM research. We demonstrate that countries in which data mining for academic research requires the express consent of rights holders, data mining makes up a significantly smaller share of total research output. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an empirical study identified a significant negative association between copyright protection and innovation. We also show that within countries where DM requires express consent by rights holders, there is an inverse relationship between rule of law indicators and the share of DM related articles in all research articles.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    M. Marra;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    The poster conveys the first results of a survey conducted among astrophysicists working at INAF. Just under 120 respondents made it possible to investigate their behaviour and opinions with regard to use of some major professional social networks and preferences about some aspects of scholarly communication and evaluation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    K. Shearer; K. Mueller; M. Gottschling;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    COAR is working towards greater interoperability of systems in a number of areas, with an emphasis on open access metadata elements and vocabularies. This paper presents the outcomes of the recently published roadmap on future directions for repository interoperability as well as an overview of the current status of the associations' work related to this topic, i.e. the initiative “Aligning Repository Networks”.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Digital Publishing Toolkit Collective; M. Riphagen; M. Rasch; F. Cramer;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    This article is an excerpt of the outcome of a two-year research and development project on hybrid publishing. The DPT Collective [1] developed a Toolkit which consists of the publication From Print to Ebooks: A Hybrid Publishing Toolkit for the Arts [2] and an online software kit [3] – which is meant for publishers who publish visually oriented books in mostly smaller print runs. This Toolkit focuses particularly (but not exclusively) on EPUB3 as an electronic publication format, and on Markdown [4] as a word processing format. The recommendations stem from our practical experience in collaborating on electronic publication projects with four Dutch art, design and research publishers: BISPublishers, Valiz, nai010 uitgevers and the Institute of Network Cultures.

Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.