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264 Research products, page 1 of 27

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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Mikael Carleheden; Nikolaj Schultz;
    Country: Denmark

    Modern social orders are legitimized by the ideal of freedom. Most conceptions of this ideal are theorized against the backdrop of nature understood as governed by its own laws beyond the realm of the social. However, such an understanding of nature is now being challenged by the ‘Anthropocene’ hypothesis. This article investigates the consequences of this hypothesis for freedom as an ideal legitimizing social order. We begin by discussing the conception of legitimation, after which we examine three classical notions of freedom (developed by Hobbes, Kant, and Hegel), in light of the Anthropocene. Following our claim that these notions all have severe weaknesses in view of the Anthropocene, we argue that modern social orders are facing a new legitimation crisis. Such a crisis, we suggest, involves a ‘brutalization of social conflicts’, which under the conditions of the Anthropocene assumes the form of geo-social conflict. Modern social orders are legitimized by the ideal of freedom. Most conceptions of this ideal are theorized against the backdrop of nature understood as governed by its own laws beyond the realm of the social. However, such an understanding of nature is now being challenged by the ‘Anthropocene’ hypothesis. This article investigates the consequences of this hypothesis for freedom as an ideal legitimizing social order. We begin by discussing the conception of legitimation, after which we examine three classical notions of freedom (developed by Hobbes, Kant, and Hegel), in light of the Anthropocene. Following our claim that these notions all have severe weaknesses in view of the Anthropocene, we argue that modern social orders are facing a new legitimation crisis. Such a crisis, we suggest, involves a ‘brutalization of social conflicts’, which under the conditions of the Anthropocene assumes the form of geo-social conflict.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Carsten Jahn Hansen; Elaine Azzopardi; Irène Béguier; Laura Ferguson; Wesley Flannery; Katia Frangoudes;
    Country: Denmark

    Coastal and maritime cultural heritage (CMCH) is a relative newcomer on spatial development policy agendas and in spatial planning activities. Cultural heritage (CH) may assist in reconstructing place narratives and identities in local and regional strategies and plans, and it may create stronger place attractiveness for outsiders. This article explores the challenges and opportunities of integrating CMCH aspects in spatial development and planning activities at local and regional levels. It specifically investigates contemporary attempts at building planning and governance spaces concerned with CMCH, based on case studies in Scotland, France, Northern Ireland, and Denmark. Emphasis is on mandatory as well as non-mandatory spatial policy and planning activities for a more sustainable and resilient coastal development. The cases show how attempts at building planning spaces concerned with both CH and CMCH have sometimes led to, or contributed to, new types of planning collaborations and products, facilitated changes in existing ones, or illuminated a lack of community involvement to be dealt with in next generation planning. Together, the cases illustrate the importance and challenges of enabling a more place-sensitive planning and of ‘finding the right planning space’ for CH integration.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Svend Brinkmann;
    Country: Denmark

    A few years ago, I received a long, handwritten letter from a woman who had read some of my books. I did not know her, but the woman mentioned in the letter that she was 90 years old, and she wanted to correct me on a few points. Most importantly, I had complained in a book that the discipline of psychology in which I work has not given sufficient attention to the idea of human dignity. The woman informed me that she had been in psychoanalysis for 33 years in order to achieve human dignity, and her analyst had based his practice on this very idea. So how could I, as a professor of psychology, say that this notion was missing from psychology, when it clearly had a life in practice? Now, three years after I received this letter, I have published a book about this woman’s life, reflecting among other things on the role of dignity in our lives. This article tells the story of how a letter from a reader initiated a relationship that resulted in a published book, as I was summoned as a researcher.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Jänicke, Stefan;
    Publisher: Springer Science+Business Media
    Country: Denmark

    The use of visualization to underpin distant reading arguments on cultural heritage data has established in the digital humanities domain. Novel strategies to represent data visually typically arise from interdisciplinary projects involving humanities and visualization scholars. However, the quality of outcomes might be inhibited as typical challenges of interdisciplinary research arise, and, at the same time, problem solving strategies are missing. I taught a course on visual data analysis in the digital humanities to let students with diverse study backgrounds experience those challenges in their early academic careers. This paper illustrates the research-teaching components of my course. This includes the contents of the theoretical training with active learning tasks, aspects of the practical training and considerations for teachers aiming to compose a related course.

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . 2022
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Khulusi, Richard; Focht, Josef; Jänicke, Stefan;
    Publisher: Springer Science+Business Media
    Country: Denmark

    While digitizing data is the first major step for many digital humanities projects, the visual analysis is of high value for humanists, as it brings a wide range of possibilities to work with data. While rather traditional analysis often concentrates on standalone or sets of information (close reading), global inspections of linked data are also requested by today’s researchers and made possible through digital processing. Hence, distance reading approaches are more and more found in humanities projects. Next to such approaches allowing new research questions of quantitative analysis, linking previously separate information on a data level is another way of providing humanists with access to further, previously not reachable, global inspections of faceted datasets. As a domain with both, faceted data and a rather low level of digitization, musicology is a prime example of how the digital humanities may improve and support the daily workflows of humanists. Despite the generally low level of digitization, multiple projects already build a basis to help in digitizing the field. As an example, the musiXplora project collected a vast amount of musicological data throughout the last 16 years and now offers both, a detailed biography of persons, places, objects, events, media, institutions and terms and also the linkage between these kinds of entities to help in giving a user a comprehensible overview in the traditionally fragmented field of musicology. Supported by a set of visualizations, the website of the project allows for visual analysis on close reading and distant reading levels. This does not only help researchers in their daily workflows but also offers users with a more casual nature an interesting view inside the domain of musicology.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Lars Bo Kaspersen; Liv Egholm;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications

    We are living in a world which is severely crisis-ridden and faces some major challenges. The fact that we are currently facing a genuine global pandemic (COVID-19) brings about even more uncertainty. The social and political institutions, which emerged and consolidated during the 20th century, and which created stability, have become fragile. The young generation born in the 1990s and onwards have experienced 9/11 and the ‘war against terrorism’, the financial crisis of 2008, changes to climate, environmental degradation, and most recently the COVID-19 pandemic. The generation born between 1960 and 1990 have had the same experiences along with severe economic crises in the 1970s and 1980s and the Cold War. Some of these challenges are in different ways intertwined with capitalism and its crises, while others are linked to the rapid development of new technologies, in particular innovations within communication and information technologies. This introduction lists the most important grand challenges facing the world as they have emerged more recently. The five articles following this introduction address some of these challenges, with particular attention to the problems of capitalism and democracy and the relation between these two areas. Most authors agree that climate change and the destruction of the environment are the biggest and most pertinent problems to address, but it is their stance that we can only meet these challenges if democracy is functioning well. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Thesis Eleven is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Achim Lichtenberger; Alex Peterson; Silvia Polla; Rubina Raja; Andreas Springer; Heiko Stukenbrok; Carmen Ting;

    This article presents selected contextualized ceramic finds of the Middle Islamic period from the Northwest Quarter in Jerash, where a settlement of the same period has been investigated over the last years (2011–2016) within the framework of the Danish-German Jerash Northwest Quarter Project. Twenty-four sherds from various vessel types were selected for petrographic analysis, with 17 of these undergoing organic residue analysis as well. We bring together here the results of these analyses and present the sherds in their archaeological contexts together with the new information from the archaeo-scientific analyses. While on the basis of the results we cannot conclude much about specific vessels being assigned certain kinds of foods, we do present wide-ranging results of differing local and imported ceramics as well as a variety of animal and vegetal remains. The results bring to the forefront new knowledge about clay varieties and availability of different kinds of foodstuffs in Middle Islamic Jerash, a topic which is understudied.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Mette Marie Roslyng; Gorm Larsen;
    Country: Denmark

    Abstract In this study we look at how pro- and anti-vaccination groups construct alternative knowledge and facts discursively and linguistically in order to challenge or support the established scientific knowledge on vaccines. Through this case study we wish to examine how the power of language interacts with a language of power when memes in creative ways mimic, produce and reproduce scientific language and practices. Drawing on a dialogical-semiotic and a discourse theoretical analytical strategy, we, first, adopt Austin’s speech act theory and Bakhtin’s concept of speech genres to argue that memes are performative with an especially illocutionary force and are made up of alien language from scientific discourses. Second, we argue that Laclau’s discursive approach to how political positions are articulated in an antagonistic terrain allows us to see vaccination memes as either subversive or supportive of a scientific social imaginary.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Rosanna Farbøl;
    Country: Denmark

    The article explores how the global Cold War conflict was made sense of and situated in local political, cultural and physical landscapes and communities during the 1980s in Britain and Denmark. Using civil defence as a prism, the article employs a comparative approach to explore variations within and between countries of how local authorities prepared or resisted the prospect of nuclear war. The article finds that two main imaginaries emerged that shaped shared understandings of society before, during and after the imagined future war: one emphasized the possibility of nuclear survival and even welfare, the other urged resistance and renounced the futility of civil defence preparations. The article argues that local actors used these imaginaries to empower themselves, to define how nuclear space was imagined and lived and to construct desirable (and undesirable) visions of the future. The imaginaries were multiscalar and interacted with developments at global and national levels, and the article sheds light on this three-way dynamic of understanding and articulating the nuclear age.

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