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21 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • 2017-2021
  • Open Access
  • Article
  • Digital Classics Online

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bodard, Gabriel; Hugh Cayless; Depauw, Mark; Isaksen, Leif; Lawrence, K. Faith; Rahtz, Sebastian;
    Publisher: Excellence Cluster Topoi
    Countries: United Kingdom, Belgium, Belgium

    Prosopographies disambiguate names appearing in sources by creating lists of persons, but the progress of scholarship now makes these lists difficult to maintain. In a digital context unique stable identifiers can be reshuffled ad libitum when searching and ordering information. Digital data increasingly brings together complementary research outputs: the Standards for Networking Ancient Prosopographies project takes on the challenge of creating an aggregated resource, adopting a Linked Open Data approach. In this paper we shall present three case studies highlighting the promise and problems of encoding unambiguous identities, titulature and other disambiguating information, and treating divine figures as person-data, respectively. Digital approaches are tools for research, assisting rather than replacing the historian, who remains central to the research endeavor. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017)

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Meins, Friedrich;
    Publisher: Prof. Dr. Charlotte Schubert, Prof. Dr. Reinhold Scholl, Dr. Roxana Kath, Dr. Michaela Rücker

    The paper argues that the (obviously fictional) quote attributed to the legendary Scythian sage Anacharsis in the work of the sceptic Sextus Empircus is more likely to be understood as some kind of ironical twist than as a substantial hint towards a specific philosophical background: At the time of Sextus, Anacharsis was best known as the proverbial wise man. As such, he denies the existence of a criterion of truth that is discussed in the respective passages. At the same time, the figure of the wise man itself is seen as a criterion of truth by several dogmatic philosophers Sextus is arguing against. This leads to a paradoxical situation in which the criterion denies the existence of the criterion explicitly, and, on a more structural level, even the wise man per se the existence of wise men in general. Several tools for the visualization of significant co-occurrences such as the eAQUA co-occurrence-analysis or the eXchange TagPies are used supportively to show that in the time of Sextus the connections between the figure of Anacharsis and the concept of sagacity are indeed much stronger than those between Anacharsis and any specific philosophical school. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,1 (2017)

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Manuel Abbt; Gerlinde Bigga; Kevin Körner; Matthias Lang; Fabian Schwabe; Dieta Frauke Svoboda;
    Publisher: University Library Heidelberg

    At the end of the 19th century, the orientalist Julius Euting traveled several times to the Middle East to investigate and to record pre-Islamic monuments, artifacts, and inscriptions. His journals and sketchbooks are preserved in the University Library of Tübingen where they recently were completely digitized. The aim of the presented project is to connect these texts with additional sources and data in a common interface.[1]This system is based on the web-framework Neatline,developed at the University of Virginia, which is able to manage and visualize heterogeneous data in a common interface. The system was extended with a functionality to store and display XML-encoded texts according to the recommendations of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). Furthermore, every entry in the journals is connected to a date or a time-span displayed in a timeline which could also be used to access the text. Beyond this, it is possible to upload or to link scientific articles to monuments, artifacts or archaeological sites mentioned by Euting. All geographical information in the diary can be directly connected to different maps provided within the system. [1] http://ecenter.uni-tuebingen.de:8012/neatline/fullscreen/start

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Seehusen, Jan;
    Publisher: Prof. Dr. Charlotte Schubert, Prof. Dr. Reinhold Scholl, Dr. Roxana Kath, Dr. Michaela Rücker

    The eManual Alte Geschichte is a digital introduction to Ancient History and contains mostly Open Educational Resources. Users can learn about Ancient history by using podcasts, ancient sources in translation (and with comments), secondary literature, and other material (such as lists of Roman emperors). Under the direction of Werner Riess, a team of seven contributors created the contents and layout of the blog from November 2015 until June 2017. In a second phase of the project in 2018, the blog will be extended and re-launched in 2019. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,3 (2017)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Matteo Romanello; Martina Trognitz; Undine Lieberwirth; Francesco Mambrini; Felix Schäfer;
    Publisher: Universität Leipzig - Lehrstuhl für Alte Geschichte

    Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017) -

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2018
    Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Jens Kupferschmidt;
    Publisher: University Library Heidelberg

    This article is a short overview on the history and functionality of the MyCoRe project, which is currently developed by various German universities. The MyCoRe-based applications can be used for cataloging and presentation of digitalized objects like papyrus, manuscripts and antique books. MyCoRe is also able to produce different kinds of repository servers.

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Bräckel, Oliver;
    Publisher: Prof. Dr. Charlotte Schubert, Prof. Dr. Reinhold Scholl, Dr. Roxana Kath, Dr. Michaela Rücker

    The following article is another contribution to the use of tag pies in the wide field of Digital Humanities. Wordclouds provide suitable means when summarizing and visualizing data to support the analysis of analytical tasks and examining of bigger collections of text. The specific use in the field of Classics will be illustrated by means of examining the corpus of the TLG (Thesaurus Linguae Graecae) with regard to the specific question about the connection of three ancient nations: Persians, Medes and Parthians. How are these nations described by the ancient authors and where are the differences and similarities between them? Hence it should be obvious which possibilities tag pies offer to help to work on specific scholarly tasks and where the limitations of this method lie. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,1 (2017)

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Schubert, Charlotte;
    Publisher: Prof. Dr. Charlotte Schubert, Prof. Dr. Reinhold Scholl, Dr. Roxana Kath, Dr. Michaela Rücker

    Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,3 (2017) -

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Elwert, Frederik; Simone Gerhards; Sellmer, Sven;

    In this paper, the authors show the application and use of automated text network analysis based on ancient corpora. The examples draw from Ancient Egyptian sources and the Indian Mahābhārata. Different text-based network generation algorithms like “Nubbi” or “Textplot” are presented in order to showcase alternative methodological approaches. Visualizations of the generated networks will help scholars to grasp complex social and semantic text structures and serve as a starting point for new research questions. All tools for applying the methods to ancient corpora are available as open source software. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rada Varga;
    Publisher: Universität Leipzig - Lehrstuhl für Alte Geschichte

    The proposed paper documents Romans 1by1, a population database working on Roman-era inscriptions. The database architecture is built for accommodating all categories of people attested epigraphically. Besides the structure, we will present the difficulties faced and questions raised when expanding and diversifying the metadata, as well as the solutions we opted for and our motivation(s) in doing so. The last section of the presentation will focus on some applications of the database. The most obvious ones, which were the focus of our interest so far as well, refer to prosopographical reconstructions (linking people which have not been linked/identified as the same person throughout more inscriptions and reconstructing relatively fluent life courses) and network analyses. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017)

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