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80 Research products, page 1 of 8

  • 2013-2022
  • Part of book or chapter of book
  • GB
  • Research Art Design Architecture Repository

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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2014
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thompson, Susannah;
    Publisher: University of Huddersfield Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    Exhibition review of Brass Art: The Imagining of Things at Huddersfield Art Gallery published in ROTOЯ Review by University of Huddersfield Press.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Daisy Abbott;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: United Kingdom

    This paper describes a learning-objective-centric workflow for modifying (‘mod-ding’) existing tabletop games for educational purposes. The workflow combines existing research for serious games design with novel systematic analysis tech-niques for learning and game mechanics and gameplay loops to improve the un-derstanding and rigour of the process. A detailed worked example applies the workflow to the development of a serious tabletop game with the educational goal of increasing knowledge and confidence of performing postgraduate literature re-views. Systematic application of the workflow to a real example supports the val-ue of this approach and provides a useful template for educators to follow for in-creasing the quality and feasibility of self-designed serious games.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Florian Urban;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Country: United Kingdom

    Large estates of towers and slabs can be found all over the German capital, and the differences between those which before 1990 were situated on different sides of the Berlin Wall are often hard to tell for the layperson. They stand witness to the dream of modern living and acceptable housing conditions for the whole population, which in the decades after the Second World War inspired the socialist regime in the East in the same way as the welfare state in the West. In terms of political background and social significance, however, the Plattenbauten (slab buildings) in the East were rather distinct from the Wohnblöcke (dwelling blocks) in the West. Not only were those in the East far more frequent – in 1990 about one third of East Berliners call a large housing estate their home, compared to about only five percent of West Berliners – they also constituted an environment that was closely aligned to the East German regime’s socio-political goals. This chapter will summarize the history of large housing estates in both East and West Berlin, pointing out commonalities and differences that determine significance and perception of these buildings to date.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nicky Bird;
    Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
    Country: United Kingdom

    "The batch of photos came from a house clearance; I believe that the lady had been a Land Girl during the war, her remaining distant family were sadly not interested in personal effects… I always used to be sad that families don't want to keep photos, but I feel that there are a lot of other unrelated people who now become custodians, and so all is not lost." eBay Seller, 2004\ud \ud "Great photograph of two men standing at a holiday resort looking at the camera. The contrast of the picture is excellent, the picture itself has several creases, nevertheless they look great. And even if the boys in the front aren't your cup of tea, there are several guys in the back. French origin dates to 1930. Comes from a relative of mine, my grandfather's dead brother, who was a salesman from the late 1920s till the 1970s. He became 90 years old and didn't have any children, what a surprise :)" eBay Seller, 2008\ud \ud \ud Between 2004-2008, I purchased hundreds of analogue family photographs on eBay, collected sellers’ statements and created two unique albums from these materials: Question for Seller, 2006, and Gay Interest Beefcake, 2008. Both physical artefacts were exhibited, sold on eBay and collected as artworks.\ud \ud The above examples suggest lingering questions. Family members have already abandoned, or are in the process of abandoning photographs that connect them to a dead, distant (and perhaps single) relative. The seller provides some facts on the life depicted. Memory is at best mediated. Speculation, in the form of ‘queering’ of a snapshot, reveals alternative meaning and assumptions of shared identification; it also appeals to a buyer’s impulse to retrieve a hidden history. This is all part of a sale, in which photographs are removed further from their kinship link. The exchange is not simply cash for photographs: connections to kinship, fragments of biography imply responsibility. These are the circumstances in which the buyer becomes the ‘new custodian.’ \ud \ud In her influential work on photographic albums, Martha Langford (2001, 2008) argues for the performative nature of the album. My contribution, as an artist who has purposefully constructed albums, proposes to add breaking up, rescuing and reassembling to Langford’s “showing and telling.” Therefore the album as artwork is an initial starting point to tease out the role of ‘new custodian’, and the rescue impulse that unwanted photographs provoke.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2014
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pickstone, Edwin;
    Publisher: University of Brighton
    Country: United Kingdom

    Book section: In Decant. Written piece and printed work on the recent history of The Caseroom at The Glasgow School of Art\ud \ud 6x6 Project abstract:\ud The Council for Higher Education Art & Design (CHEAD) definition of ‘minority specialist subjects’ encompasses ‘subjects that are concerned with the teaching and learning of core skills, materials and processes; specifically this would cover subjects that are concerned with non-digital issues, and with the physicality of processes/materials’ (2009). Subject areas identified through case studies and research include technical and workshop areas such as ceramics, metalwork, textiles, bookbinding and letterpress (Farren, 2008). Farren argues the economic value of these subjects, which have traditionally formed a part of the core learning of art and design education that has given the UK its creative ‘edge’.\ud \ud The benefits of teaching graphic design students letterpress in relationship to learning to understand typography is well-documented. Spencer (1982) argued for retaining ‘craft’ subjects as the physicality of processes including letterpress foster immersive learning. Edwards (2005) argues that the letterpress process is a significant teaching tool that complements, and should act in conjunction with, computer-based design education. Cooper & Gridneff (2009) believe that processes such as letterpress should be explored beyond the value of a teaching tool. They argue that processes such as letterpress are valuable due to the transferable skills that they can equip students with, such as an appreciation of physical space and the speed of work fostering reflection-in-action.\ud \ud At present, the importance of research into specialist subject areas has been identified, but is disparate. The six colleges identified to participate in the project have active letterpress workshops with a dedicated member of technical staff. Each are engaged with practice-led research, but at the time of writing there is no mechanism for collectively reviewing and sharing this research. In doing so, a model could be created for other specialist subjects to follow.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brownrigg, Jenny;
    Publisher: Cubitt Gallery, Studios and Education
    Country: United Kingdom

    'Live Your Questions Now' is a case study for Cubitt Education's publication 'Aging in Public: creative practice in ageing and the public realm from across the UK', edited by Daniel Baker and published by Cubitt Gallery, Studios and Education, London in 2016. The publication was linked to Cubitt's programme 'Public Wisdom' (2011-2015). My case study is about 'Live your questions now', a group exhibition I curated in 2011 for Mackintosh Museum, The Glasgow School of Art. 'Live your questions now' was a survey show of national and international artists who were sixty years old or over. Artists included: Sam Ainsley, Helena Almeida, Alasdair Gray, Joan Jonas, Ana Jotta, Bela Kolarova, Lygia Pape and Michael Kidner. The show was a critique of the model of a survey show, which in recent years predominantly has focused on young, emerging artists. The exhibition aimed to look at contemporary practice through the longevity of a career and assess what drove artists' to keep on making their work into their 60s', 70s' and 80s'.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Daisy Abbott;
    Publisher: ACI
    Country: United Kingdom

    Dialogic learning has a substantial overlap with the characteristics of multi-player game-based learning (GBL). Both dialogic and game-based learning are proposed to be beneficial methods for postgraduate learning contexts with higher order cognitive and skill-based outcomes. Research skills and critical thinking are widely shown to be crucially important but very challenging to deliver effectively. This paper uses three case studies of existing tabletop games to consider how modification to include dialogic learning can improve learning outcomes in a postgraduate context. Games were analysed using gameplay loops and characteristics of dialogic games are identified with recommendations of specific Learning Mechanic – Game Mechanic mappings. Learning Mechanics proposed to encourage dialogue were identified as: Plan, Analyse, Reflect, and Consolidate, typically associated with the following Game Mechanics: Stategy/Planning, Design/Edit, Match, Measure, and Feedback. Game Mechanics which may inhibit dialogic learning are Time Pressure, Competition, and Dexterity. An interaction model is presented with recommendations for dialogic game design which is proposed to increase dialogic learning which can increase student ownership, confidence, and consolidation of knowledge. This contributes to the current research gap for dialogical interactions within GBL.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gunn, Vicky;
    Publisher: Pearson
    Country: United Kingdom

    No abstract available.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    McCormack, Helen;
    Publisher: Routledge
    Country: United Kingdom

    ‘Housing the Collection: The Great Windmill Street Anatomy Theatre and Museum’, in William Hunter and the Art and Science of Eighteenth-Century Collecting, Ashgate (Histories of Material Culture and Collecting 1700-1900)\ud Year of Publication: 2013\ud \ud This essay describes the original house and collection of the eminent Scottish anatomist, Dr William Hunter 1718-1783 and explains how the Great Windmill Street Anatomy Theatre and Museum connected Hunter’s ambitions for his collection, an accumulation and combinability of natural and artificial curiosities, with the ambitious plans of ‘improvement’ for the city itself. Hunter’s ‘great school’ incorporated details of the urban architectural schemes of John Gwynn in his London and Westminster Improved (1766) and constituted an exemplar of the public/private spaces characteristic of late eighteenth-century London.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrea Taylor; Lorna Bernard; H. Pizey; Craig Whittet; Samantha C.E. Davies; David Hammond; Julian Edge;
    Publisher: ACM
    Country: United Kingdom

    Telecare is personal and environmental sensors that support people to remain safe and independent in their own home for longer. Telecare plays an important role in addressing the challenges of an ageing population. However, many people do not wear the most common form provided, the community alarm, for reasons that include the way that it looks. In the UK, a contributing factor to this problem is that manufacturers cater to telecare service providers (e.g. local authorities) and as a result, service users are not involved in design processes. This paper describes a redesign of the community alarm by a leading manufacturer, involving participatory design activities with users and the wider public, and design internships. The main innovation of the new community alarm, called BodyGuard, is that it connects with the user's smartphone to enable it to work outside the home. We report insights and lessons learned during the innovation process, within the context of social care reforms giving people more control and choice over the services that they receive.

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