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13,264 Projects

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  • 2017

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 657211
    Overall Budget: 183,455 EURFunder Contribution: 183,455 EUR

    The researcher is moving from Italy to the UK in order to build a new chronology and classification method for early metal artefacts (i.e. axes, daggers and halberds) from Italy, c.4500-2000 BC. The project aims will be achieved through a combination of radiocarbon dating and scientifically informed work on artefact classification criteria, which takes into account the technological transformation undergone by the objects during their life-cycles. The importance of the project is twofold: (a) this is the first time that a researcher develops a reflexive approach to metalwork classification, which explicitly takes into consideration forging, use and other post-casting alterations to the shape and features of objects; (b) it is also the first attempt ever made to ground the chronology of early Italian metalwork in a comprehensive set of radiocarbon dates. The significance of the project goes beyond Italian archaeology insofar as early Italian metals are typologically cross-linked to similar objects in Europe and the Mediterranean. It is thus anticipated that the project will bring about dramatic changes in our understanding of the chronology and developmental sequence of prehistoric metal technology across large swathes of Europe, with particular reference to central Europe, the western Balkans, Sardinia and Crete. Whilst working on the project, the researcher will acquire new expertise in metalwork use-wear analysis and Neutron Diffraction (ND) analysis, two cutting-edge techniques of artefact characterization. ND analysis will be deployed during a secondment at the ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Didcot, UK). The researcher will also develop new skills in radiocarbon dating, artefact classification and statistical analysis. Newcastle University, the host organisation, will in turn benefit from the researcher's expertise in Italian and European prehistory, with special regard to the technology of prehistoric bronzes.

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  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R56HL126778-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 395,000 USD
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  • Funder: WT Project Code: 200359
    Funder Contribution: 250,000 GBP
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  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R21ES025032-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 212,222 USD
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  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R21EB019118-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 203,996 USD
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  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R21AI116433-01
    Funder Contribution: 193,125 USD
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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M009718/1
    Funder Contribution: 100,454 GBP

    The theory of operator algebras goes back to Murray, von Neumann, Gelfand and Naimark. The original motivation was to provide a mathematical foundation for quantum mechanics. At the same time, from the very beginning of the subject, it was anticipated that operator algebras form very interesting structures on their own right and will have applications to unitary representations of groups and operator theory in Hilbert space. Actually, much more turned out to be true. After some dramatic and unexpected developments, the theory of operator algebras has established itself as a very active and highly interdisciplinary research area. Not only do there exist - as initially envisioned - strong connections to quantum physics as well as representation theory and operator theory, operator algebras nowadays have far reaching applications in various mathematical disciplines like functional analysis, algebra, geometric group theory, geometry, topology or dynamical systems. One of the most important classes of operator algebras is given by C*-algebras, which are defined as norm-closed, self-adjoint algebras of bounded linear operators on a Hilbert space. As in many areas in mathematics, advances in the theory of C*-algebras went hand in hand with the discovery of interesting and illuminating examples, the most prominent ones being group C*-algebras and C*-algebras attached to dynamical systems, so-called crossed products. The main objects of study in this research project are given by semigroup C*-algebras, which are natural generalizations of group C*-algebras. Our goal is to analyse the structure of semigroup C*-algebras and to use this construction as a tool to study groups and their subsemigroups from the point of view of geometric group theory. Closely related to this, this project also aims at a better understanding of the interplay between C*-algebras and dynamical systems. Our project lies at the frontier of current research. We take up recent advances in semigroup C*-algebras, classification of C*-algebras, the interplay between C*-algebras and symbolic dynamics, as well as the discovery of rigidity phenomena in operator algebras and dynamical systems. One of the key characteristics of our research project is its high interdisciplinary character. It lies at the interface of several research areas in mathematics and brings together expertise from different fields. This takes up the trend in mathematics that interactions between different branches are becoming more and more important. Therefore, the mathematical community as a whole benefits through an active and inspiring exchange of ideas.

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  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R21AG047412-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 261,000 USD
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  • Funder: NSF Project Code: 1503927
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  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5F32EB021159-02
    Funder Contribution: 47,190 USD
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Advanced search in
Projects
arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
13,264 Projects
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 657211
    Overall Budget: 183,455 EURFunder Contribution: 183,455 EUR

    The researcher is moving from Italy to the UK in order to build a new chronology and classification method for early metal artefacts (i.e. axes, daggers and halberds) from Italy, c.4500-2000 BC. The project aims will be achieved through a combination of radiocarbon dating and scientifically informed work on artefact classification criteria, which takes into account the technological transformation undergone by the objects during their life-cycles. The importance of the project is twofold: (a) this is the first time that a researcher develops a reflexive approach to metalwork classification, which explicitly takes into consideration forging, use and other post-casting alterations to the shape and features of objects; (b) it is also the first attempt ever made to ground the chronology of early Italian metalwork in a comprehensive set of radiocarbon dates. The significance of the project goes beyond Italian archaeology insofar as early Italian metals are typologically cross-linked to similar objects in Europe and the Mediterranean. It is thus anticipated that the project will bring about dramatic changes in our understanding of the chronology and developmental sequence of prehistoric metal technology across large swathes of Europe, with particular reference to central Europe, the western Balkans, Sardinia and Crete. Whilst working on the project, the researcher will acquire new expertise in metalwork use-wear analysis and Neutron Diffraction (ND) analysis, two cutting-edge techniques of artefact characterization. ND analysis will be deployed during a secondment at the ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Didcot, UK). The researcher will also develop new skills in radiocarbon dating, artefact classification and statistical analysis. Newcastle University, the host organisation, will in turn benefit from the researcher's expertise in Italian and European prehistory, with special regard to the technology of prehistoric bronzes.

    more_vert
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R56HL126778-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 395,000 USD
    more_vert
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 200359
    Funder Contribution: 250,000 GBP
    more_vert
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R21ES025032-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 212,222 USD
    more_vert
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R21EB019118-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 203,996 USD
    more_vert
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R21AI116433-01
    Funder Contribution: 193,125 USD
    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M009718/1
    Funder Contribution: 100,454 GBP

    The theory of operator algebras goes back to Murray, von Neumann, Gelfand and Naimark. The original motivation was to provide a mathematical foundation for quantum mechanics. At the same time, from the very beginning of the subject, it was anticipated that operator algebras form very interesting structures on their own right and will have applications to unitary representations of groups and operator theory in Hilbert space. Actually, much more turned out to be true. After some dramatic and unexpected developments, the theory of operator algebras has established itself as a very active and highly interdisciplinary research area. Not only do there exist - as initially envisioned - strong connections to quantum physics as well as representation theory and operator theory, operator algebras nowadays have far reaching applications in various mathematical disciplines like functional analysis, algebra, geometric group theory, geometry, topology or dynamical systems. One of the most important classes of operator algebras is given by C*-algebras, which are defined as norm-closed, self-adjoint algebras of bounded linear operators on a Hilbert space. As in many areas in mathematics, advances in the theory of C*-algebras went hand in hand with the discovery of interesting and illuminating examples, the most prominent ones being group C*-algebras and C*-algebras attached to dynamical systems, so-called crossed products. The main objects of study in this research project are given by semigroup C*-algebras, which are natural generalizations of group C*-algebras. Our goal is to analyse the structure of semigroup C*-algebras and to use this construction as a tool to study groups and their subsemigroups from the point of view of geometric group theory. Closely related to this, this project also aims at a better understanding of the interplay between C*-algebras and dynamical systems. Our project lies at the frontier of current research. We take up recent advances in semigroup C*-algebras, classification of C*-algebras, the interplay between C*-algebras and symbolic dynamics, as well as the discovery of rigidity phenomena in operator algebras and dynamical systems. One of the key characteristics of our research project is its high interdisciplinary character. It lies at the interface of several research areas in mathematics and brings together expertise from different fields. This takes up the trend in mathematics that interactions between different branches are becoming more and more important. Therefore, the mathematical community as a whole benefits through an active and inspiring exchange of ideas.

    download15
    downloaddownloads15
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R21AG047412-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 261,000 USD
    more_vert
  • Funder: NSF Project Code: 1503927
    more_vert
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5F32EB021159-02
    Funder Contribution: 47,190 USD
    more_vert