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155 Projects, page 1 of 16

  • 2017-2021
  • 2028

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/S024093/1
    Funder Contribution: 5,395,820 GBP
    Partners: IMPERIAL CANCER RESEARCH FUND, H3B, UCB Pharma (Belgium), Perspectum Diagnostics, SimOmics, CCDC, BenevolentAI, GE Healthcare, Mirada Medical UK, Ex Scientia Ltd...

    Building upon our existing flagship industry-linked EPSRC & MRC CDT in Systems Approaches to Biomedical Science (SABS), the new EPSRC CDT in Sustainable Approaches to Biomedical Science: Responsible and Reproducible Research - SABS:R^3 - will train a further five cohorts, each of 15 students, in cutting-edge systems approaches to biomedical research and, uniquely within the UK, in advanced practices in software engineering. Our renewed goal is to bring about a transformation of the research culture in computational biomedical science. Computational methods are now at the heart of biomedical research. From the simulation of the behaviour of complex systems, through the design and automation of laboratory experiments, to the analysis of both small and large-scale data, well-engineered software has proved capable of transforming biomedical science. Biomedical science is therefore dependent as never before on research software. Industries reliant on this continued innovation in biomedical science play a critical role in the UK economy. The biopharmaceutical and medical technology industrial sectors alone generate an annual turnover of over £63 billion and employ 233,000 scientists and staff. In his foreword to the 2017 Life Sciences Industrial Strategy, Sir John Bell noted that, "The global life sciences industry is expected to reach >$2 trillion in gross value by 2023... there are few, if any, sectors more important to support as part of the industrial strategy." The report identifies the need to provide training in skills in "informatics, computational, mathematical and statistics areas" as being of major concern for the life sciences industry. Over the last 9 years, the existing SABS CDT has been working with its consortium of now 22 industrial and institutional partners to meet these training needs. Over this same period, continued advances in information technology have accelerated the shift in the biomedical research landscape in an increasingly quantitative and predictive direction. As a result, computational and hence software-driven approaches now underpin all aspects of the research pipeline. In spite of this central importance, the development of research software is typically a by-product of the research process, with the research publication being the primary output. Research software is typically not made available to the research community, or even to peer reviewers, and therefore cannot be verified. Vast amounts of research time is lost (usually by PhD students with no formal training in software development) in re-implementing already-existing solutions from the literature. Even if successful, the re-implemented software is again not released to the community, and the cycle repeats. No consideration is made of the huge benefits of model verification, re-use, extension, and maintainability, nor of the implications for the reproducibility of the published research. Progress in biomedical science is thus impeded, with knock-on effects into clinical translation and knowledge transfer into industry. There is therefore an urgent need for a radically different approach. The SABS:R^3 CDT will build on the existing SABS Programme to equip a new generation of biomedical research scientists with not only the knowledge and methods necessary to take a quantitative and interdisciplinary approach, but also with advanced software engineering skills. By embedding this strong focus on sustainable and open computational methods, together with responsible and reproducible approaches, into all aspects of the new programme, our computationally-literate scientists will be equipped to act as ambassadors to bring about a transformation of biomedical research.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: MR/T022434/1
    Funder Contribution: 958,448 GBP
    Partners: UCLan

    Digital health technologies (DHT) comprise a broad range of applications such as telehealth, wearable devices and smart-phone and tablet applications (apps). However, whilst national and international policies present ambitious plans for DHT to revolutionise healthcare, there has been little consideration of how they can be successfully integrated into healthcare systems and processes. This is important as many reports show that even well designed DHT fail to be adopted or are quickly abandoned in clinical practice, meaning that their potential to transform healthcare is lost. Stroke rehabilitation presents an ideal opportunity to use DHT to improve patient outcomes. Pressures on services mean that the amount of rehabilitation that can be directly delivered by staff, particularly for the arm, falls far short of that known to be beneficial resulting in sub-optimal outcomes for many people and reduced quality of life. With the numbers of people surviving a stroke set to double in the next 15 years, DHT provides an attractive, innovative, practical and engaging way for staff to prescribe additional rehabilitation and improve recovery for people after stroke, within current service constraints. However, DHT are not widely used in rehabilitation and the factors that influence their use in clinical practice are not known. This project seeks to identify and understand the factors that will influence the use of DHT in healthcare. It will employ this knowledge to design, implement and evaluate a DHT intervention, using rehabilitation after stroke as a case example. The project has 3 initial phases. In phase 1, the evidence considering if and how DHT are used in healthcare will be reviewed, to explore the factors influencing their use. A national survey, observations of practice, questionnaires and interviews will describe current practice and explore the behaviours and beliefs of people after stroke, rehabilitation staff and service managers about using DHT. This information will be used to develop a theory about, and framework of, the factors influencing the use of DHT in healthcare rehabilitation. In phase 2, the theory and framework will be used to co-design, create and undertake initial testing of an app and intervention to supplement routine rehabilitation for the arm after stroke with rehabilitation staff, stroke survivors and DHT developers from our in-house innovation lab. In phase 3, the initial feasibility, acceptability and costs of the app and intervention to supplement stroke rehabilitation at a single NHS trust will be evaluated. Data from interviews, questionnaires and generated by the app will investigate how it was used in practice. These findings will be used to further refine the theory and framework developed in Phase 1 and the app and intervention developed in Phase 2. In the second period of the fellowship (Phase 4), a multi-site feasibility study of the app and intervention will be conducted. The project outputs will also be used to guide and assess the use of other forms of DHT (e.g. virtual reality) in stroke rehabilitation and their transferability to support and evaluate DHT in other healthcare settings will be evaluated. This project will transform how DHT can be used in healthcare by generating a clear theory and framework and providing practical tools which detail the factors that must be considered in the design, implementation and evaluation of DHT. It will provide guidance on how patients and healthcare staff can co-design DHT and design a future trial of the effectiveness of the app and intervention. Its results will benefit technology developers and researchers by helping them design and utilise DHT to improve patient outcomes and enable healthcare organisations and policy-makers to consider the vital processes and resources required to realise the vision of a truly innovative and DHT-enabled healthcare service.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/S023305/1
    Funder Contribution: 5,861,740 GBP
    Partners: Aerial UK, CereProc Ltd, GlaxoSmithKline PLC, WB, Internet Society, Connected Digital Economy Catapult, NTU, Bionical, GT, XenZone...

    We will train a cohort of 65 PhD students to tackle the challenge of Data Creativity for the 21st century digital economy. In partnership with over 40 industry and academic partners, our students will establish the technologies and methods to enable producers and consumers to co-create smarter products in smarter ways and so establish trust in the use of personal data. Data is widely recognised by industry as being the 'fuel' that powers the economy. However, the highly personal nature of much data has raised concerns about privacy and ownership that threaten to undermine consumers' trust. Unlocking the economic potential of personal data while tackling societal concerns demands a new approach that balances the ability to innovate new products with building trust and ensuring compliance with a complex regulatory framework. This requires PhD students with a deep appreciation of the capabilities of emerging technology, the ability to innovate new products, but also an understanding of how this can be done in a responsible way. Our approach to this challenge is one of Data Creativity - enabling people to take control of their data and exercise greater agency by becoming creative consumers who actively co-create more trusted products. Driven by the needs of industry, public sector and third sector partners who have so far committed £1.6M of direct and £2.8M of in kind funding, we will explore multiple sectors including Fast Moving Consumer Goods and Food; Creative Industries; Health and Wellbeing; Personal Finance; and Smart Mobility and how it can unlock synergies between these. Our partners also represent interests in enabling technologies and the cross cutting concerns of privacy and security. Each student will work with industry, public, third sector or international partners to ensure that their research is grounded in real user needs, maximising its impact while also enhancing their future employability. External partners will be involved in PhD co-design, supervision, training, providing resources, hosting placements, setting industry-led challenge projects and steering. Addressing the challenges of Data Creativity demands a multi-disciplinary approach that combines expertise in technology development and human-centred methods with domain expertise across key sectors of the economy. Our students will be situated within Horizon, a leading centre for Digital Economy research and a vibrant environment that draws together a national research Hub, CDT and a network of over 100 industry, academic and international partners. We currently provide access to a network of >80 potential supervisors, ranging from leading Professors to talented early career researchers. This extends to academic partners at other Universities who will be involved in co-hosting and supervising our students, including the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility at De Montfort University. We run an integrated four-year training programme that features: a bespoke core covering key topics in Future Products, Enabling Technologies, Innovation and Responsibility; optional advanced specialist modules; internship and international exchanges; industry-led challenge projects; training in research methods and professional skills; modules dedicated to the PhD proposal, planning and write up; and many opportunities for cross-cohort collaboration including our annual industry conference, retreat and summer schools. Our Impact Fund supports students in deepening the impact of their research. Horizon has EDI considerations embedded throughout, from consideration of equal opportunities in recruitment to ensuring that we deliver an inclusive environment which supports diversity of needs and backgrounds in the student experience.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/T008695/1
    Funder Contribution: 7,441,630 GBP
    Partners: University of Liverpool

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at www.rcuk.ac.uk/StudentshipTerminology. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: WT Project Code: 218481
    Funder Contribution: 6,051,820 GBP
    Partners: University of Cambridge

    Specialist post-graduate training in Stem Cell Biology and Medicine is essential to produce a stream of highly skilled and innovative investigators equipped with a deep understanding of stem cell science and its significance for future medicine. In this context, the Wellcome PhD Programme in Stem Cell Biology and Medicine is unique in the UK in focus and scope. The enduring popularity of the programme, which receives on average 200 applications per year, and the quality of research outputs and next destinations are testament to both the calibre of students we are able to recruit and to the high-quality training they receive. Our programme provides an environment that is intellectually rigorous and personally supportive for students, enabling them to set and attain research objectives. The programme is designed to develop analytical and critically-minded individuals. Since its inception in 2008, the PhD Programme has evolved in response to the expressed needs of students and continuous developments in modern Stem Cell Biology. Our overarching goal is to produce well-trained and rounded PhD graduates who have generated significant and original research findings and are fully prepared for an ambitious and challenging career, whether continuing in stem cell science or moving to another profession.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2589553
    Partners: University of Exeter

    The aim of this research is to explore and interrogate the ways in which the prominent discourse of masculinity within neo-muscular conservative evangelical Christian Men's groups (such as the Promise Keepers USA, the Mighty Men South Africa, and the Aryan Jesus movement of 1930s Europe) are manifested and perpetuated through symbolically violent, hyper-masculinised theological discourses. Within the resources these groups provide- such as sermons and other preaching material, books, podcasts, and speeches at conferences- combative imagery in the form of militarised metaphor, sports metaphor, brotherhood metaphors and nostalgic familial metaphors are utilised to promote a problematic outworking of masculinity. The use of militarised imagery, for example, serves to define those with alternative ideas about masculinity as 'enemy', whom it is incumbent on a 'real man' to 'defeat', fostering environments of hostility and shame for those who do not conform to hegemonic masculinity. Using a methodology rooted in Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) and Critical Metaphor Analysis (CMA), my research aims to expose and problematise the intersection between colonialism, nationalism, homophobia, and masculinity which underpins the theological discourses about masculinity expressed by these movements through combative metaphor. Through analysing the resources of these groups within a CMA framework, a hierarchy of metaphors, conceptual metaphors and conceptual metaphorical keys is revealed, highlighting the ways in which what is promoted as 'biblical theology' regarding gender, is inherently founded in deep-rooted concerns about national identity, the conquest of land, political power dynamics, familial belonging, and fears of emasculation. This results in biblical texts and preaching being hyper-masculinised through combative language and being subsequently deployed as weapons against 'culture' by men's groups to promote a hegemonic, heteronormative and arguably, toxic 'biblical manhood'. In the latter part of the thesis I will offer alternative hermeneutical models for engaging with the hyper-masculinised theological and biblical discourses expressed through 'Muscular Christian' men's groups. The way in which the creation of metaphor requires a bridge of understanding between the speaker and listener, I will argue, makes for a creative, collaborative engagement, building connection between the participants in dialogue. Through a CMA framework, I will therefore examine whether within the varied host of problematic metaphors used to embody theological ideologies, more affiliative metaphors might offer some traction for modifying some of the other more violent, aggressive, or conflictual models of masculinity and opening constructive dialogue between opposing viewpoints.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/S022139/1
    Funder Contribution: 5,452,170 GBP
    Partners: Teraview Ltd, PervasID Ltd, University of London, Eblana Photonics Ltd, Integer Holdings Corporation, TREL, Xtera Communications Limited, VividQ, Optalysys Ltd, BAE Systems...

    This proposal seeks funding to create a Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Connected Electronic and Photonic Systems (CEPS). Photonics has moved from a niche industry to being embedded in the majority of deployed systems, ranging from sensing, biophotonics and advanced manufacturing, through communications from the chip-to-chip to transcontinental scale, to display technologies, bringing higher resolution, lower power operation and enabling new ways of human-machine interaction. These advances have set the scene for a major change in commercialisation activity where electronics photonics and wireless converge in a wide range of information, sensing, communications, manufacturing and personal healthcare systems. Currently manufactured systems are realised by combining separately developed photonics, electronic and wireless components. This approach is labour intensive and requires many electrical interconnects as well as optical alignment on the micron scale. Devices are optimised separately and then brought together to meet systems specifications. Such an approach, although it has delivered remarkable results, not least the communications systems upon which the internet depends, limits the benefits that could come from systems-led design and the development of technologies for seamless integration of electronic photonics and wireless systems. To realise such connected systems requires researchers who have not only deep understanding of their specialist area, but also an excellent understanding across the fields of electronic photonics and wireless hardware and software. This proposal seeks to meet this important need, building upon the uniqueness and extent of the UCL and Cambridge research, where research activities are already focussing on higher levels of electronic, photonic and wireless integration; the convergence of wireless and optical communication systems; combined quantum and classical communication systems; the application of THz and optical low-latency connections in data centres; techniques for the low-cost roll-out of optical fibre to replace the copper network; the substitution of many conventional lighting products with photonic light sources and extensive application of photonics in medical diagnostics and personalised medicine. Many of these activities will increasingly rely on more advanced systems integration, and so the proposed CDT includes experts in electronic circuits, wireless systems and software. By drawing these complementary activities together, and building upon initial work towards this goal carried out within our previously funded CDT in Integrated Photonic and Electronic Systems, it is proposed to develop an advanced training programme to equip the next generation of very high calibre doctoral students with the required technical expertise, responsible innovation (RI), commercial and business skills to enable the £90 billion annual turnover UK electronics and photonics industry to create the closely integrated systems of the future. The CEPS CDT will provide a wide range of methods for learning for research students, well beyond that conventionally available, so that they can gain the required skills. In addition to conventional lectures and seminars, for example, there will be bespoke experimental coursework activities, reading clubs, roadmapping activities, responsible innovation (RI) studies, secondments to companies and other research laboratories and business planning courses. Connecting electronic and photonic systems is likely to expand the range of applications into which these technologies are deployed in other key sectors of the economy, such as industrial manufacturing, consumer electronics, data processing, defence, energy, engineering, security and medicine. As a result, a key feature of the CDT will be a developed awareness in its student cohorts of the breadth of opportunity available and the confidence that they can make strong impact thereon.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2604266
    Partners: University of Stirling

    'Multilevel models', defined here as statistical models that include random effects parameters in order to analyse a data structure that features clustering of individual cases within higher level units, are popular and widely used analytical tools across the social sciences. Nevertheless, when multilevel models are deployed in applied research scenarios, they frequently violate an assumption associated with their statistical estimation, namely that the estimated random effects are uncorrelated with explanatory variables (hereafter 'NCRX'). If there is a correlation, it has been demonstrated that parameter estimates could be biased and/or inefficient. Although the statistical issues of the NCRX assumption have already been demonstrated, there remain many research applications where the assumption is not fully explored, and there are notable divergences between social science disciplines in how seriously the assumption is taken. This PhD project will review methodological and applied research literature on the NCRX assumption across social science disciplines; analyse simulated data to explore the importance of the assumption in different plausible contexts; and pursue secondary survey analyses (using 'Understanding Society', special licence versions) on two case studies that will illustrate varying consequences of NCRX and its violation (on socio-economic inequalities by occupations, and on health inequalities by localities). The aims of the PhD are to communicate the issue and its relevance; to compare and contrast responses to the NCRX assumption in research applications; and to develop and promote appropriate methodological recommendations, both theoretical and operational. It will make an original contribution by comparing applied research across disciplines, and by examining the full spectrum of activities that are associated with preparing, estimating and interpreting statistical models. The outcomes of the research will have an impact on how we understand and support applied social research that uses complex statistical models.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2268138
    Partners: University of Bristol

    My practice-based research project will investigate ways of presenting Roman history and archaeology at the National Roman Legion Museum (NRLM). It will test ideas for refreshing and communicating the history of the Roman occupation of Wales to new audiences in and around the site using a variety of audio-visual media. Through this work, I will generate new knowledge about the history of the Roman occupation of Wales, and the aesthetic, narrative and technical possibilities of audio-visual media in museums.

  • Project . 2020 - 2028
    Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: WT Project Code: 218510
    Funder Contribution: 5,488,460 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    Identifying disease-associated genes, mutations and perturbed expression is only the first stage towards understanding human disease and the development of therapeutics. In Bristol we aspire to understand gene function and the proteins they encode across spatial scales, from the molecular level through to functional studies in cells, tissues and organisms. Since proteins, cells and tissues are all dynamic, wherever possible these processes need to be studied through multiple timescales. Advances in spatial and temporal resolution of microscopy provide opportunities to study processes at an unprecedented level across molecular and cellular scales. Only by combining these approaches will we truly understand organismal-level health, the pathoetiology of diseases and provide rational therapeutic routes to relieve them. This relies on biologists operating at the interface between molecular and cell biology. Our Wellcome programme will recruit, support and train a new generation of PhD students in Biomedical Research, with a broad base and understanding of molecular cell biology techniques coupled with world-class expertise in their PhD topic. These students will be trained to become future leaders in a wide range of careers, founded upon a holistic and rounded personal and professional development, which incorporates the best practice in PhD training.

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155 Projects, page 1 of 16
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/S024093/1
    Funder Contribution: 5,395,820 GBP
    Partners: IMPERIAL CANCER RESEARCH FUND, H3B, UCB Pharma (Belgium), Perspectum Diagnostics, SimOmics, CCDC, BenevolentAI, GE Healthcare, Mirada Medical UK, Ex Scientia Ltd...

    Building upon our existing flagship industry-linked EPSRC & MRC CDT in Systems Approaches to Biomedical Science (SABS), the new EPSRC CDT in Sustainable Approaches to Biomedical Science: Responsible and Reproducible Research - SABS:R^3 - will train a further five cohorts, each of 15 students, in cutting-edge systems approaches to biomedical research and, uniquely within the UK, in advanced practices in software engineering. Our renewed goal is to bring about a transformation of the research culture in computational biomedical science. Computational methods are now at the heart of biomedical research. From the simulation of the behaviour of complex systems, through the design and automation of laboratory experiments, to the analysis of both small and large-scale data, well-engineered software has proved capable of transforming biomedical science. Biomedical science is therefore dependent as never before on research software. Industries reliant on this continued innovation in biomedical science play a critical role in the UK economy. The biopharmaceutical and medical technology industrial sectors alone generate an annual turnover of over £63 billion and employ 233,000 scientists and staff. In his foreword to the 2017 Life Sciences Industrial Strategy, Sir John Bell noted that, "The global life sciences industry is expected to reach >$2 trillion in gross value by 2023... there are few, if any, sectors more important to support as part of the industrial strategy." The report identifies the need to provide training in skills in "informatics, computational, mathematical and statistics areas" as being of major concern for the life sciences industry. Over the last 9 years, the existing SABS CDT has been working with its consortium of now 22 industrial and institutional partners to meet these training needs. Over this same period, continued advances in information technology have accelerated the shift in the biomedical research landscape in an increasingly quantitative and predictive direction. As a result, computational and hence software-driven approaches now underpin all aspects of the research pipeline. In spite of this central importance, the development of research software is typically a by-product of the research process, with the research publication being the primary output. Research software is typically not made available to the research community, or even to peer reviewers, and therefore cannot be verified. Vast amounts of research time is lost (usually by PhD students with no formal training in software development) in re-implementing already-existing solutions from the literature. Even if successful, the re-implemented software is again not released to the community, and the cycle repeats. No consideration is made of the huge benefits of model verification, re-use, extension, and maintainability, nor of the implications for the reproducibility of the published research. Progress in biomedical science is thus impeded, with knock-on effects into clinical translation and knowledge transfer into industry. There is therefore an urgent need for a radically different approach. The SABS:R^3 CDT will build on the existing SABS Programme to equip a new generation of biomedical research scientists with not only the knowledge and methods necessary to take a quantitative and interdisciplinary approach, but also with advanced software engineering skills. By embedding this strong focus on sustainable and open computational methods, together with responsible and reproducible approaches, into all aspects of the new programme, our computationally-literate scientists will be equipped to act as ambassadors to bring about a transformation of biomedical research.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: MR/T022434/1
    Funder Contribution: 958,448 GBP
    Partners: UCLan

    Digital health technologies (DHT) comprise a broad range of applications such as telehealth, wearable devices and smart-phone and tablet applications (apps). However, whilst national and international policies present ambitious plans for DHT to revolutionise healthcare, there has been little consideration of how they can be successfully integrated into healthcare systems and processes. This is important as many reports show that even well designed DHT fail to be adopted or are quickly abandoned in clinical practice, meaning that their potential to transform healthcare is lost. Stroke rehabilitation presents an ideal opportunity to use DHT to improve patient outcomes. Pressures on services mean that the amount of rehabilitation that can be directly delivered by staff, particularly for the arm, falls far short of that known to be beneficial resulting in sub-optimal outcomes for many people and reduced quality of life. With the numbers of people surviving a stroke set to double in the next 15 years, DHT provides an attractive, innovative, practical and engaging way for staff to prescribe additional rehabilitation and improve recovery for people after stroke, within current service constraints. However, DHT are not widely used in rehabilitation and the factors that influence their use in clinical practice are not known. This project seeks to identify and understand the factors that will influence the use of DHT in healthcare. It will employ this knowledge to design, implement and evaluate a DHT intervention, using rehabilitation after stroke as a case example. The project has 3 initial phases. In phase 1, the evidence considering if and how DHT are used in healthcare will be reviewed, to explore the factors influencing their use. A national survey, observations of practice, questionnaires and interviews will describe current practice and explore the behaviours and beliefs of people after stroke, rehabilitation staff and service managers about using DHT. This information will be used to develop a theory about, and framework of, the factors influencing the use of DHT in healthcare rehabilitation. In phase 2, the theory and framework will be used to co-design, create and undertake initial testing of an app and intervention to supplement routine rehabilitation for the arm after stroke with rehabilitation staff, stroke survivors and DHT developers from our in-house innovation lab. In phase 3, the initial feasibility, acceptability and costs of the app and intervention to supplement stroke rehabilitation at a single NHS trust will be evaluated. Data from interviews, questionnaires and generated by the app will investigate how it was used in practice. These findings will be used to further refine the theory and framework developed in Phase 1 and the app and intervention developed in Phase 2. In the second period of the fellowship (Phase 4), a multi-site feasibility study of the app and intervention will be conducted. The project outputs will also be used to guide and assess the use of other forms of DHT (e.g. virtual reality) in stroke rehabilitation and their transferability to support and evaluate DHT in other healthcare settings will be evaluated. This project will transform how DHT can be used in healthcare by generating a clear theory and framework and providing practical tools which detail the factors that must be considered in the design, implementation and evaluation of DHT. It will provide guidance on how patients and healthcare staff can co-design DHT and design a future trial of the effectiveness of the app and intervention. Its results will benefit technology developers and researchers by helping them design and utilise DHT to improve patient outcomes and enable healthcare organisations and policy-makers to consider the vital processes and resources required to realise the vision of a truly innovative and DHT-enabled healthcare service.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/S023305/1
    Funder Contribution: 5,861,740 GBP
    Partners: Aerial UK, CereProc Ltd, GlaxoSmithKline PLC, WB, Internet Society, Connected Digital Economy Catapult, NTU, Bionical, GT, XenZone...

    We will train a cohort of 65 PhD students to tackle the challenge of Data Creativity for the 21st century digital economy. In partnership with over 40 industry and academic partners, our students will establish the technologies and methods to enable producers and consumers to co-create smarter products in smarter ways and so establish trust in the use of personal data. Data is widely recognised by industry as being the 'fuel' that powers the economy. However, the highly personal nature of much data has raised concerns about privacy and ownership that threaten to undermine consumers' trust. Unlocking the economic potential of personal data while tackling societal concerns demands a new approach that balances the ability to innovate new products with building trust and ensuring compliance with a complex regulatory framework. This requires PhD students with a deep appreciation of the capabilities of emerging technology, the ability to innovate new products, but also an understanding of how this can be done in a responsible way. Our approach to this challenge is one of Data Creativity - enabling people to take control of their data and exercise greater agency by becoming creative consumers who actively co-create more trusted products. Driven by the needs of industry, public sector and third sector partners who have so far committed £1.6M of direct and £2.8M of in kind funding, we will explore multiple sectors including Fast Moving Consumer Goods and Food; Creative Industries; Health and Wellbeing; Personal Finance; and Smart Mobility and how it can unlock synergies between these. Our partners also represent interests in enabling technologies and the cross cutting concerns of privacy and security. Each student will work with industry, public, third sector or international partners to ensure that their research is grounded in real user needs, maximising its impact while also enhancing their future employability. External partners will be involved in PhD co-design, supervision, training, providing resources, hosting placements, setting industry-led challenge projects and steering. Addressing the challenges of Data Creativity demands a multi-disciplinary approach that combines expertise in technology development and human-centred methods with domain expertise across key sectors of the economy. Our students will be situated within Horizon, a leading centre for Digital Economy research and a vibrant environment that draws together a national research Hub, CDT and a network of over 100 industry, academic and international partners. We currently provide access to a network of >80 potential supervisors, ranging from leading Professors to talented early career researchers. This extends to academic partners at other Universities who will be involved in co-hosting and supervising our students, including the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility at De Montfort University. We run an integrated four-year training programme that features: a bespoke core covering key topics in Future Products, Enabling Technologies, Innovation and Responsibility; optional advanced specialist modules; internship and international exchanges; industry-led challenge projects; training in research methods and professional skills; modules dedicated to the PhD proposal, planning and write up; and many opportunities for cross-cohort collaboration including our annual industry conference, retreat and summer schools. Our Impact Fund supports students in deepening the impact of their research. Horizon has EDI considerations embedded throughout, from consideration of equal opportunities in recruitment to ensuring that we deliver an inclusive environment which supports diversity of needs and backgrounds in the student experience.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/T008695/1
    Funder Contribution: 7,441,630 GBP
    Partners: University of Liverpool

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at www.rcuk.ac.uk/StudentshipTerminology. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: WT Project Code: 218481
    Funder Contribution: 6,051,820 GBP
    Partners: University of Cambridge

    Specialist post-graduate training in Stem Cell Biology and Medicine is essential to produce a stream of highly skilled and innovative investigators equipped with a deep understanding of stem cell science and its significance for future medicine. In this context, the Wellcome PhD Programme in Stem Cell Biology and Medicine is unique in the UK in focus and scope. The enduring popularity of the programme, which receives on average 200 applications per year, and the quality of research outputs and next destinations are testament to both the calibre of students we are able to recruit and to the high-quality training they receive. Our programme provides an environment that is intellectually rigorous and personally supportive for students, enabling them to set and attain research objectives. The programme is designed to develop analytical and critically-minded individuals. Since its inception in 2008, the PhD Programme has evolved in response to the expressed needs of students and continuous developments in modern Stem Cell Biology. Our overarching goal is to produce well-trained and rounded PhD graduates who have generated significant and original research findings and are fully prepared for an ambitious and challenging career, whether continuing in stem cell science or moving to another profession.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2589553
    Partners: University of Exeter

    The aim of this research is to explore and interrogate the ways in which the prominent discourse of masculinity within neo-muscular conservative evangelical Christian Men's groups (such as the Promise Keepers USA, the Mighty Men South Africa, and the Aryan Jesus movement of 1930s Europe) are manifested and perpetuated through symbolically violent, hyper-masculinised theological discourses. Within the resources these groups provide- such as sermons and other preaching material, books, podcasts, and speeches at conferences- combative imagery in the form of militarised metaphor, sports metaphor, brotherhood metaphors and nostalgic familial metaphors are utilised to promote a problematic outworking of masculinity. The use of militarised imagery, for example, serves to define those with alternative ideas about masculinity as 'enemy', whom it is incumbent on a 'real man' to 'defeat', fostering environments of hostility and shame for those who do not conform to hegemonic masculinity. Using a methodology rooted in Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) and Critical Metaphor Analysis (CMA), my research aims to expose and problematise the intersection between colonialism, nationalism, homophobia, and masculinity which underpins the theological discourses about masculinity expressed by these movements through combative metaphor. Through analysing the resources of these groups within a CMA framework, a hierarchy of metaphors, conceptual metaphors and conceptual metaphorical keys is revealed, highlighting the ways in which what is promoted as 'biblical theology' regarding gender, is inherently founded in deep-rooted concerns about national identity, the conquest of land, political power dynamics, familial belonging, and fears of emasculation. This results in biblical texts and preaching being hyper-masculinised through combative language and being subsequently deployed as weapons against 'culture' by men's groups to promote a hegemonic, heteronormative and arguably, toxic 'biblical manhood'. In the latter part of the thesis I will offer alternative hermeneutical models for engaging with the hyper-masculinised theological and biblical discourses expressed through 'Muscular Christian' men's groups. The way in which the creation of metaphor requires a bridge of understanding between the speaker and listener, I will argue, makes for a creative, collaborative engagement, building connection between the participants in dialogue. Through a CMA framework, I will therefore examine whether within the varied host of problematic metaphors used to embody theological ideologies, more affiliative metaphors might offer some traction for modifying some of the other more violent, aggressive, or conflictual models of masculinity and opening constructive dialogue between opposing viewpoints.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/S022139/1
    Funder Contribution: 5,452,170 GBP
    Partners: Teraview Ltd, PervasID Ltd, University of London, Eblana Photonics Ltd, Integer Holdings Corporation, TREL, Xtera Communications Limited, VividQ, Optalysys Ltd, BAE Systems...

    This proposal seeks funding to create a Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Connected Electronic and Photonic Systems (CEPS). Photonics has moved from a niche industry to being embedded in the majority of deployed systems, ranging from sensing, biophotonics and advanced manufacturing, through communications from the chip-to-chip to transcontinental scale, to display technologies, bringing higher resolution, lower power operation and enabling new ways of human-machine interaction. These advances have set the scene for a major change in commercialisation activity where electronics photonics and wireless converge in a wide range of information, sensing, communications, manufacturing and personal healthcare systems. Currently manufactured systems are realised by combining separately developed photonics, electronic and wireless components. This approach is labour intensive and requires many electrical interconnects as well as optical alignment on the micron scale. Devices are optimised separately and then brought together to meet systems specifications. Such an approach, although it has delivered remarkable results, not least the communications systems upon which the internet depends, limits the benefits that could come from systems-led design and the development of technologies for seamless integration of electronic photonics and wireless systems. To realise such connected systems requires researchers who have not only deep understanding of their specialist area, but also an excellent understanding across the fields of electronic photonics and wireless hardware and software. This proposal seeks to meet this important need, building upon the uniqueness and extent of the UCL and Cambridge research, where research activities are already focussing on higher levels of electronic, photonic and wireless integration; the convergence of wireless and optical communication systems; combined quantum and classical communication systems; the application of THz and optical low-latency connections in data centres; techniques for the low-cost roll-out of optical fibre to replace the copper network; the substitution of many conventional lighting products with photonic light sources and extensive application of photonics in medical diagnostics and personalised medicine. Many of these activities will increasingly rely on more advanced systems integration, and so the proposed CDT includes experts in electronic circuits, wireless systems and software. By drawing these complementary activities together, and building upon initial work towards this goal carried out within our previously funded CDT in Integrated Photonic and Electronic Systems, it is proposed to develop an advanced training programme to equip the next generation of very high calibre doctoral students with the required technical expertise, responsible innovation (RI), commercial and business skills to enable the £90 billion annual turnover UK electronics and photonics industry to create the closely integrated systems of the future. The CEPS CDT will provide a wide range of methods for learning for research students, well beyond that conventionally available, so that they can gain the required skills. In addition to conventional lectures and seminars, for example, there will be bespoke experimental coursework activities, reading clubs, roadmapping activities, responsible innovation (RI) studies, secondments to companies and other research laboratories and business planning courses. Connecting electronic and photonic systems is likely to expand the range of applications into which these technologies are deployed in other key sectors of the economy, such as industrial manufacturing, consumer electronics, data processing, defence, energy, engineering, security and medicine. As a result, a key feature of the CDT will be a developed awareness in its student cohorts of the breadth of opportunity available and the confidence that they can make strong impact thereon.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2604266
    Partners: University of Stirling

    'Multilevel models', defined here as statistical models that include random effects parameters in order to analyse a data structure that features clustering of individual cases within higher level units, are popular and widely used analytical tools across the social sciences. Nevertheless, when multilevel models are deployed in applied research scenarios, they frequently violate an assumption associated with their statistical estimation, namely that the estimated random effects are uncorrelated with explanatory variables (hereafter 'NCRX'). If there is a correlation, it has been demonstrated that parameter estimates could be biased and/or inefficient. Although the statistical issues of the NCRX assumption have already been demonstrated, there remain many research applications where the assumption is not fully explored, and there are notable divergences between social science disciplines in how seriously the assumption is taken. This PhD project will review methodological and applied research literature on the NCRX assumption across social science disciplines; analyse simulated data to explore the importance of the assumption in different plausible contexts; and pursue secondary survey analyses (using 'Understanding Society', special licence versions) on two case studies that will illustrate varying consequences of NCRX and its violation (on socio-economic inequalities by occupations, and on health inequalities by localities). The aims of the PhD are to communicate the issue and its relevance; to compare and contrast responses to the NCRX assumption in research applications; and to develop and promote appropriate methodological recommendations, both theoretical and operational. It will make an original contribution by comparing applied research across disciplines, and by examining the full spectrum of activities that are associated with preparing, estimating and interpreting statistical models. The outcomes of the research will have an impact on how we understand and support applied social research that uses complex statistical models.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2268138
    Partners: University of Bristol

    My practice-based research project will investigate ways of presenting Roman history and archaeology at the National Roman Legion Museum (NRLM). It will test ideas for refreshing and communicating the history of the Roman occupation of Wales to new audiences in and around the site using a variety of audio-visual media. Through this work, I will generate new knowledge about the history of the Roman occupation of Wales, and the aesthetic, narrative and technical possibilities of audio-visual media in museums.

  • Project . 2020 - 2028
    Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: WT Project Code: 218510
    Funder Contribution: 5,488,460 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    Identifying disease-associated genes, mutations and perturbed expression is only the first stage towards understanding human disease and the development of therapeutics. In Bristol we aspire to understand gene function and the proteins they encode across spatial scales, from the molecular level through to functional studies in cells, tissues and organisms. Since proteins, cells and tissues are all dynamic, wherever possible these processes need to be studied through multiple timescales. Advances in spatial and temporal resolution of microscopy provide opportunities to study processes at an unprecedented level across molecular and cellular scales. Only by combining these approaches will we truly understand organismal-level health, the pathoetiology of diseases and provide rational therapeutic routes to relieve them. This relies on biologists operating at the interface between molecular and cell biology. Our Wellcome programme will recruit, support and train a new generation of PhD students in Biomedical Research, with a broad base and understanding of molecular cell biology techniques coupled with world-class expertise in their PhD topic. These students will be trained to become future leaders in a wide range of careers, founded upon a holistic and rounded personal and professional development, which incorporates the best practice in PhD training.

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