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2,071 Projects, page 1 of 208

  • UK Research and Innovation
  • 2015
  • 2016

10
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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/N013700/1
    Funder Contribution: 117,604 GBP
    Partners: Durham University

    'Transcapes is a collective research project using what Europe's mainstream political and media discourse has framed as a refugee crisis, in order to understand wider transformations in the geopolitical body of Europe itself. Situating ourselves in the island of Lesbos, we examine the key actors on the island - humanitarian, social, political - and the contestation over fields and spaces of action opening in the midst of this emergency and the greatest population move in the continent in decades. Broadening our scope, we also look at Greece as a vector of its own contradictions and as the object of political decisions which will inevitably compromise its already weak position within the EU. In the third and largest of our cognitive concentric circles (Lesbos, Greece, the EU), we are trying to understand the crisis of Europe's own decision-making and executing mechanisms as a whole: to read through the inconsistencies and gaps in these and to follow and map out what emerges out of these transformations.'

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/M018903/1
    Funder Contribution: 109,074 GBP
    Partners: University of Strathclyde

    During the last twenty years, there has been an explosion in new microscopy techniques which exploit the high peak intensities from laser sources for excitation of fluorescent dyes used as markers in live cells. These methods, which are based on nonlinear optics, offer several advantages for the biologist over more traditional imaging techniques. These include imaging of deeper tissue thanks to longer excitation wavelengths, avoidance of damaging short-wavelengths, and an overall reduction in photo-bleaching. However, it has been generally accepted that these nonlinear microscopy methods must use a laser focused to a tiny spot which is then scanned around the specimen. This limits the capture rate of information to around 1 frame/second. This is a major limitation to the method for studying live cells, since rapid and important changes in the intra-cellular biochemistry are often missed. A few methods for increasing the imaging speed of nonlinear microscopy have been demonstrated, but only one is commercially available (which is essential when the technology is to be used in a biology research laboratory). This technique involves splitting a single high-intensity laser beam into up to 64 lower intensity 'beamlets' which are then scanned around the specimen, but this unfortunately can result in a 'patchwork quilt' effect which introduces unwanted artifacts into the images and can render interpretation and analysis difficult. To provide the advantages of nonlinear microscopy but at fast capture speeds, we propose to capitalize on innovations in sensor technology and use a less well-focused laser beam, which will illuminate the full image field. This 'wide-field' method is known to biologists, but in a linear (single-photon) rather than nonlinear (two-photon) approach, and therefore is a simple adaptation to existing instrumentation that is familiar to the end-user. The key difference in our technology over a conventional fluorescence microscope will be the light source, which we will change from a light-emitting diode to a high peak intensity laser (which we already have in our laboratory). We will also use small modifications to the microscope and add a sensitive scientific camera detector. Our calculations show that nonlinear excitation of fluorescence is possible at capture speeds of up to 100 frames/second. We will test this new technology with non-biological specimens initially, and then apply the method to two different cell types to study both fast and slow calcium signalling events. If we are successful, this technology is almost certain to change how cell biologists obtain images of their specimens which, in turn, will likely have a long-term impact on pharmacology and the development of new medicines.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 1654436
    Partners: UEA

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation or 'anammox' is the most recent addition to processes recognised in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle (1,2). Originally discovered in a Dutch waste-water treatment plant, anammox bacteria combine nitrite and ammonium to make N2 in the absence of O2. It has since become clear that these bacteria are metabolically dominant in O2-minimum zones across the world's oceans and may produce one out of every two N2 molecules released annually into the atmosphere. Despite the environmental and biotechnological importance of anammox there is very little knowledge of the enzymology underpinning the process. This exciting and ambitious project builds on recent success in the purification of novel anammox enzymes and has the aim of resolving the structural, catalytic and redox properties of these enzymes (1-5). The successful applicant will be a talented biochemist or chemist with an enthusiasm for metalloproteins and enzymology who will develop advanced skills in the characterisation of redox enzymes by spectroscopic (EPR and MCD), spectro-electrochemical and protein film voltammetric methods. Research will be performed within the vibrant Centre for Molecular and Spectroscopic Biochemistry under the supervision of Professor Julea Butt and Dr Myles Cheesman in the School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia and in collaboration with Dr Jan Keltjens, Dr Boran Kartal and Prof Mike Jetten, Nijmegen University, NL.

  • Project . 2015 - 2016
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 752783
    Funder Contribution: 5,000 GBP
    Partners: B Williamson

    A design and installation process for the fitting of removable or permanent secondary glazing to non-standard windows.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 710702
    Funder Contribution: 99,919 GBP
    Partners: Affarii Technologies Limited

    The objective of this project is to undertake a live proof of concept trial of a new Digital Audio Broadcast architecture for comparative performance assessments and network interoperability testing. Affarii has developed a concept and core technology for a Digital Audio Broadcast (DAB) small site which addresses the challenges associated with increasing digital radio geographic and population coverage. Initial investigations have shown that Affarii’s small site approach has significant advantages over traditional network infrastructure: - 85% reduction in network power consumption for the same coverage area. - 75% reduction in overall site size for a typical installed service configuration. - 60% reduction in cost over an equivalent site using current network architecture. - Major improvement in local service support and cross network interference. - Flexible setup and management of services without physical reconfiguration. - Potential to reduce scheduled routine service from 3-6 month to 24 months. These advantages alter the economics of achieving >95% of population coverage, offering governments like the UK the potential to realize switch off traditional analog FM services. Additional benefits are low cost provision of local digital radio and ‘service on demand’ for special events - both areas of interest for the UK telecom regulator OFCOM. The development of small sites does have major challenges: the technology must exceed RF performance metrics of other leading wireless systems like 4G and even then small sites also do not fit the standard regulatory class of traditional high power DAB systems. The project will setup a live trial site that allows detailed measurement, comparison and interoperability of a small site within a live network environment for the purpose of supporting an application for regulatory approval for use in the UK and EU.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 132142
    Funder Contribution: 51,074 GBP
    Partners: Fraunhofer UK Research

    Offshore renewable energy such as tidal, wave and offshore wind is an important part of the UK energy supply and is becoming more so. However there are challenges when it comes to operating in an offshore or marine environment. The cable infrastructure can be vulnerable to being dragged or worn. The transmission capacity can limit the ammount of energy taken from a device or device array. Repair of offshore cables or infrastructure is costly. This project seeks to investigate the feasibiity of combining two types of sensor technology on a shared optical fibre network that can provide real time monitoring of electrical performance and also the physical condition of a cable in a marine energy project. The proposed system would use pre- existing optical fibre already on the installed power cable to opticallly interrogate electrical sensors and to also perform as a dsitributed sensor The expected outcome from the project is a system level design with technical and commercial development plan to fully exploit this technology.

  • Project . 2015 - 2016
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 132070
    Funder Contribution: 30,100 GBP
    Partners: Glen Dimplex Home Appliances Limited

    In preserving and extending the life of food, medicines or drugs, fridges would seem like a circular economy hero, but they make up one of the largest part of UK e-waste, contain complex constuctions or materials that are hard to reuse or recycle, and have not got more durable or longer lasting over the years. Fridges are simply not designed, made or sold with circularity in mind. Bringing together Glen Dimplex Home Appliances fridge market and manufacturing know-how, The Sure Chill Company's new, more circular refridgeration technology and Seymourpowell's innovation, design and sustainability expertise, this project aims to rethink fridges for a circular economy. Using a design-led innovation process, our feasibility study will investigate and identify a new circular business model for Professional fridges - initially for UK Catering and Medical customers. Proving successsful would divert 600 tons of fridges from e-waste p/a, and then be scaled up by GDHA to other segments, markets and appliances

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 509445
    Funder Contribution: 138,327 GBP
    Partners: Kingston University Higher Education Corporation

    To apply legal compliance methodology used for large multinational companies, to develop a legal compliance software tool for smaller businesses operating in the united Arab Emirates

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M508366/1
    Funder Contribution: 123,967 GBP
    Partners: University of Oxford

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a cryptographic scheme which provides an unprecedented level of data security. This can be used to prevent data breaches such as ATM 'Skimming' attacks. Our project seeks to develop practical application of QKD in securing short-range wireless communication between a terminal such as an ATM and a handheld device (e.g. mobile phone). Our consortium, Nokia R&D UK Ltd., Alpha Contract Engineering (ACE) and University of Oxford have identified the 3 main barriers to commercialisation, namely, the lack of low-cost optical wireless steering techniques, high cost barrier to complex optical assembly for quantum receivers and the lack of mass-manufacturable single photon detector (SPD) arrays on CMOS platform. A fast and precise optical steering device (University of Oxford) that directs single photons from a handheld device to a quantum receiver will be developed. Testing of individual system components will be carried out. In particular, miniaturised and simplified optical assemblies using existing UK manufacturing capability will be researched, built and tested for QKD use (ACE). Critical parameters of SPD arrays on scalable CMOS platform will be measured (University of Oxford) and used in detailed simulation and modelling to select the best suited steering method. Finally, a prototype wireless quantum link will be built (Nokia & University of Oxford) with simplified optics (ACE) to demonstrate the feasibility of secure quantum wireless transactions.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: MR/N003403/1
    Funder Contribution: 16,000,000 GBP
    Partners: University of Glasgow

    The synergy between imaging and genomics technologies has been recognised as being an important driver to the future development of Stratified or Precision Medicine. The benefits of stratified medicine are now globally recognised, and Scotland is uniquely placed to capitalise on this potential, owing to its strong academic research base, advanced electronic health records within the NHS, and a strong industry presence in genomics, bioinformatics and diagnostics. The South Glasgow University Hospital represents an investment to Glasgow and Scotland in the region of £1Billion. When it opens in 2015, the new hospital will be the largest in Western Europe and will include maternity, paediatric and adult services on a single site. The Imagine Centre of Excellence (ICE), located at the new hospital, will uniquely accommodate a 7 Tesla MRI scanner together with other imaging modalities for clinical and research use, including 3T MRI and high resolution multi-slice CT, all networked and sharing staff with the large number of service scanners within the main hospital. This state-of-the-art equipment will be housed alongside clinical academic imaging specialists, NHS clinical physics expertise, innovation space for industry, and potential for expansion of precision medicine activities.The University of Glasgow led the development of the Scotland-wide £20M Stratified Medicine Scotland Innovation Centre (SMS-IC), which will be based adjacent to the ICE building. The co-location of ICE and SMS-IC will therefore provide significant added value to both centres. The creation of an internationally competitive centre in medical imaging incorporating NHS, academic and industry partners will allow Glasgow to support a much greater volume and variety of clinical trials and translational development than currently, including the associated supply chain. The facility will be co-located alongside commercial, learning, research and clinical facilities, and will be accessible to industry partners and collaborators thus ensuring spin off benefits to the local Scottish company base of specialist CROs and other service providers. The proposed facility will maximise and facilitate the economic impact from the clinical research excellence at the new South Glasgow University Hospital, and ensure the hospital site becomes a clinical research-driven UK exemplar of a Life Sciences cluster. As such, the proposal fully aligns with the Scottish Life Sciences Strategy and the facility will add significant value to existing assets in Scotland.

Advanced search in
Projects
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Searching FieldsTerms
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arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
2,071 Projects, page 1 of 208
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/N013700/1
    Funder Contribution: 117,604 GBP
    Partners: Durham University

    'Transcapes is a collective research project using what Europe's mainstream political and media discourse has framed as a refugee crisis, in order to understand wider transformations in the geopolitical body of Europe itself. Situating ourselves in the island of Lesbos, we examine the key actors on the island - humanitarian, social, political - and the contestation over fields and spaces of action opening in the midst of this emergency and the greatest population move in the continent in decades. Broadening our scope, we also look at Greece as a vector of its own contradictions and as the object of political decisions which will inevitably compromise its already weak position within the EU. In the third and largest of our cognitive concentric circles (Lesbos, Greece, the EU), we are trying to understand the crisis of Europe's own decision-making and executing mechanisms as a whole: to read through the inconsistencies and gaps in these and to follow and map out what emerges out of these transformations.'

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/M018903/1
    Funder Contribution: 109,074 GBP
    Partners: University of Strathclyde

    During the last twenty years, there has been an explosion in new microscopy techniques which exploit the high peak intensities from laser sources for excitation of fluorescent dyes used as markers in live cells. These methods, which are based on nonlinear optics, offer several advantages for the biologist over more traditional imaging techniques. These include imaging of deeper tissue thanks to longer excitation wavelengths, avoidance of damaging short-wavelengths, and an overall reduction in photo-bleaching. However, it has been generally accepted that these nonlinear microscopy methods must use a laser focused to a tiny spot which is then scanned around the specimen. This limits the capture rate of information to around 1 frame/second. This is a major limitation to the method for studying live cells, since rapid and important changes in the intra-cellular biochemistry are often missed. A few methods for increasing the imaging speed of nonlinear microscopy have been demonstrated, but only one is commercially available (which is essential when the technology is to be used in a biology research laboratory). This technique involves splitting a single high-intensity laser beam into up to 64 lower intensity 'beamlets' which are then scanned around the specimen, but this unfortunately can result in a 'patchwork quilt' effect which introduces unwanted artifacts into the images and can render interpretation and analysis difficult. To provide the advantages of nonlinear microscopy but at fast capture speeds, we propose to capitalize on innovations in sensor technology and use a less well-focused laser beam, which will illuminate the full image field. This 'wide-field' method is known to biologists, but in a linear (single-photon) rather than nonlinear (two-photon) approach, and therefore is a simple adaptation to existing instrumentation that is familiar to the end-user. The key difference in our technology over a conventional fluorescence microscope will be the light source, which we will change from a light-emitting diode to a high peak intensity laser (which we already have in our laboratory). We will also use small modifications to the microscope and add a sensitive scientific camera detector. Our calculations show that nonlinear excitation of fluorescence is possible at capture speeds of up to 100 frames/second. We will test this new technology with non-biological specimens initially, and then apply the method to two different cell types to study both fast and slow calcium signalling events. If we are successful, this technology is almost certain to change how cell biologists obtain images of their specimens which, in turn, will likely have a long-term impact on pharmacology and the development of new medicines.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 1654436
    Partners: UEA

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation or 'anammox' is the most recent addition to processes recognised in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle (1,2). Originally discovered in a Dutch waste-water treatment plant, anammox bacteria combine nitrite and ammonium to make N2 in the absence of O2. It has since become clear that these bacteria are metabolically dominant in O2-minimum zones across the world's oceans and may produce one out of every two N2 molecules released annually into the atmosphere. Despite the environmental and biotechnological importance of anammox there is very little knowledge of the enzymology underpinning the process. This exciting and ambitious project builds on recent success in the purification of novel anammox enzymes and has the aim of resolving the structural, catalytic and redox properties of these enzymes (1-5). The successful applicant will be a talented biochemist or chemist with an enthusiasm for metalloproteins and enzymology who will develop advanced skills in the characterisation of redox enzymes by spectroscopic (EPR and MCD), spectro-electrochemical and protein film voltammetric methods. Research will be performed within the vibrant Centre for Molecular and Spectroscopic Biochemistry under the supervision of Professor Julea Butt and Dr Myles Cheesman in the School of Chemistry, University of East Anglia and in collaboration with Dr Jan Keltjens, Dr Boran Kartal and Prof Mike Jetten, Nijmegen University, NL.

  • Project . 2015 - 2016
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 752783
    Funder Contribution: 5,000 GBP
    Partners: B Williamson

    A design and installation process for the fitting of removable or permanent secondary glazing to non-standard windows.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 710702
    Funder Contribution: 99,919 GBP
    Partners: Affarii Technologies Limited

    The objective of this project is to undertake a live proof of concept trial of a new Digital Audio Broadcast architecture for comparative performance assessments and network interoperability testing. Affarii has developed a concept and core technology for a Digital Audio Broadcast (DAB) small site which addresses the challenges associated with increasing digital radio geographic and population coverage. Initial investigations have shown that Affarii’s small site approach has significant advantages over traditional network infrastructure: - 85% reduction in network power consumption for the same coverage area. - 75% reduction in overall site size for a typical installed service configuration. - 60% reduction in cost over an equivalent site using current network architecture. - Major improvement in local service support and cross network interference. - Flexible setup and management of services without physical reconfiguration. - Potential to reduce scheduled routine service from 3-6 month to 24 months. These advantages alter the economics of achieving >95% of population coverage, offering governments like the UK the potential to realize switch off traditional analog FM services. Additional benefits are low cost provision of local digital radio and ‘service on demand’ for special events - both areas of interest for the UK telecom regulator OFCOM. The development of small sites does have major challenges: the technology must exceed RF performance metrics of other leading wireless systems like 4G and even then small sites also do not fit the standard regulatory class of traditional high power DAB systems. The project will setup a live trial site that allows detailed measurement, comparison and interoperability of a small site within a live network environment for the purpose of supporting an application for regulatory approval for use in the UK and EU.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 132142
    Funder Contribution: 51,074 GBP
    Partners: Fraunhofer UK Research

    Offshore renewable energy such as tidal, wave and offshore wind is an important part of the UK energy supply and is becoming more so. However there are challenges when it comes to operating in an offshore or marine environment. The cable infrastructure can be vulnerable to being dragged or worn. The transmission capacity can limit the ammount of energy taken from a device or device array. Repair of offshore cables or infrastructure is costly. This project seeks to investigate the feasibiity of combining two types of sensor technology on a shared optical fibre network that can provide real time monitoring of electrical performance and also the physical condition of a cable in a marine energy project. The proposed system would use pre- existing optical fibre already on the installed power cable to opticallly interrogate electrical sensors and to also perform as a dsitributed sensor The expected outcome from the project is a system level design with technical and commercial development plan to fully exploit this technology.

  • Project . 2015 - 2016
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 132070
    Funder Contribution: 30,100 GBP
    Partners: Glen Dimplex Home Appliances Limited

    In preserving and extending the life of food, medicines or drugs, fridges would seem like a circular economy hero, but they make up one of the largest part of UK e-waste, contain complex constuctions or materials that are hard to reuse or recycle, and have not got more durable or longer lasting over the years. Fridges are simply not designed, made or sold with circularity in mind. Bringing together Glen Dimplex Home Appliances fridge market and manufacturing know-how, The Sure Chill Company's new, more circular refridgeration technology and Seymourpowell's innovation, design and sustainability expertise, this project aims to rethink fridges for a circular economy. Using a design-led innovation process, our feasibility study will investigate and identify a new circular business model for Professional fridges - initially for UK Catering and Medical customers. Proving successsful would divert 600 tons of fridges from e-waste p/a, and then be scaled up by GDHA to other segments, markets and appliances

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 509445
    Funder Contribution: 138,327 GBP
    Partners: Kingston University Higher Education Corporation

    To apply legal compliance methodology used for large multinational companies, to develop a legal compliance software tool for smaller businesses operating in the united Arab Emirates

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M508366/1
    Funder Contribution: 123,967 GBP
    Partners: University of Oxford

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a cryptographic scheme which provides an unprecedented level of data security. This can be used to prevent data breaches such as ATM 'Skimming' attacks. Our project seeks to develop practical application of QKD in securing short-range wireless communication between a terminal such as an ATM and a handheld device (e.g. mobile phone). Our consortium, Nokia R&D UK Ltd., Alpha Contract Engineering (ACE) and University of Oxford have identified the 3 main barriers to commercialisation, namely, the lack of low-cost optical wireless steering techniques, high cost barrier to complex optical assembly for quantum receivers and the lack of mass-manufacturable single photon detector (SPD) arrays on CMOS platform. A fast and precise optical steering device (University of Oxford) that directs single photons from a handheld device to a quantum receiver will be developed. Testing of individual system components will be carried out. In particular, miniaturised and simplified optical assemblies using existing UK manufacturing capability will be researched, built and tested for QKD use (ACE). Critical parameters of SPD arrays on scalable CMOS platform will be measured (University of Oxford) and used in detailed simulation and modelling to select the best suited steering method. Finally, a prototype wireless quantum link will be built (Nokia & University of Oxford) with simplified optics (ACE) to demonstrate the feasibility of secure quantum wireless transactions.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: MR/N003403/1
    Funder Contribution: 16,000,000 GBP
    Partners: University of Glasgow

    The synergy between imaging and genomics technologies has been recognised as being an important driver to the future development of Stratified or Precision Medicine. The benefits of stratified medicine are now globally recognised, and Scotland is uniquely placed to capitalise on this potential, owing to its strong academic research base, advanced electronic health records within the NHS, and a strong industry presence in genomics, bioinformatics and diagnostics. The South Glasgow University Hospital represents an investment to Glasgow and Scotland in the region of £1Billion. When it opens in 2015, the new hospital will be the largest in Western Europe and will include maternity, paediatric and adult services on a single site. The Imagine Centre of Excellence (ICE), located at the new hospital, will uniquely accommodate a 7 Tesla MRI scanner together with other imaging modalities for clinical and research use, including 3T MRI and high resolution multi-slice CT, all networked and sharing staff with the large number of service scanners within the main hospital. This state-of-the-art equipment will be housed alongside clinical academic imaging specialists, NHS clinical physics expertise, innovation space for industry, and potential for expansion of precision medicine activities.The University of Glasgow led the development of the Scotland-wide £20M Stratified Medicine Scotland Innovation Centre (SMS-IC), which will be based adjacent to the ICE building. The co-location of ICE and SMS-IC will therefore provide significant added value to both centres. The creation of an internationally competitive centre in medical imaging incorporating NHS, academic and industry partners will allow Glasgow to support a much greater volume and variety of clinical trials and translational development than currently, including the associated supply chain. The facility will be co-located alongside commercial, learning, research and clinical facilities, and will be accessible to industry partners and collaborators thus ensuring spin off benefits to the local Scottish company base of specialist CROs and other service providers. The proposed facility will maximise and facilitate the economic impact from the clinical research excellence at the new South Glasgow University Hospital, and ensure the hospital site becomes a clinical research-driven UK exemplar of a Life Sciences cluster. As such, the proposal fully aligns with the Scottish Life Sciences Strategy and the facility will add significant value to existing assets in Scotland.

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