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919 Projects, page 1 of 92

  • UK Research and Innovation
  • 2008
  • 2009

10
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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/F034717/1
    Funder Contribution: 81,802 GBP
    Partners: University of Salford

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/D039053/2
    Funder Contribution: 37,380 GBP
    Partners: Imperial College London

    This project concerns the valuation and hedging of certain financial derivatives, American and barrier options. A barrier option is a derivative that is activated or extinguished if a certain rate, asset price or index crosses a specified level. An American option on a stock is a contract that gives its holder the right to exercise it at any time before expiry and receive then a certain payment from the seller, which may depend on the price of the stock at that moment. As American and barrier options are widely traded in financal markets, accurate valuation and hedging of American and barrier options are important issues.By their nature the valuation of American and barrier options is generally more involved than that of standard European options such as calls and puts: for example there is no known closed form solution for the value of an American put even under the simplifying assumptions of the classical Black-Scholes model. For valuation and hedging of these contracts one therefore has to resort to approximations. The aim of the proposed research is to make a contribution to the development of new algorithms and to investigate their mathematical properties, especially in the context of more realistic pricing models than the classical Black-Scholes model.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F033826/1
    Funder Contribution: 16,534 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    Recently, with the unfortunate emergence of bio-terrorism and its threat to both military targets and civilian populations, it is necessary to develop a portable and cheap system to continuously monitor for any potential aerosolized agents (biological particles) released from deadly biological weapons in any open area, even in harsh environments. As most bio-molecules show strong absorption in the ultra-violet (UV) spectral region ranging from 280 to 340 nm, an efficient UV lighting source is expected to be a crucial component for next-generation biological detection, biological imaging and disease analysis applications. In particular use of UV laser diodes would enable high sensitivity detection systems. III-nitride semiconductors are the best materials to make such laser diodes. In last decade, there have been major achievements in this area. However, the achievements are limited to the violet/blue spectral region, with those devices mainly based on the InGaN alloy. Due to a number of challenges in material growth, a 343 nm laser diode is the shortest one so far reported. Obviously, such a laser diode is not short enough to be employable for above applications.Target of this exploratory project is the development of the first 337 nm UV laser diode based on the GaN/AlGaN material system to replace currently used N2 gas-based lasers. This work is based on recent major advances of the here involved UK teams in the field of III-nitride semiconductors. Further applications of the technology involve biological imaging as an efficient method to detect diseases in a human body, for example, cancerous tissues.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/E023967/1
    Funder Contribution: 228,296 GBP
    Partners: University of Salford

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Project . 2008 - 2009
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/F010966/1
    Funder Contribution: 131,134 GBP
    Partners: Newcastle University, Gulmay Medical Limited

    Aging of cells and organisms is largely determined by damage to cellular molecules, the efficiency of damage repair and the cellular mechanisms of response and adaptation to the remaining damage. We are primarily interested in the mechanisms and the importance of cellular senescence, which is the permanent loss of the ability of cells to divide and growth. Damage to DNA, either in the form of loss of telomeres (the very ends of all chromosomes), or of DNA breaks, is a major trigger of cellular senescence. Thus, senescence prevents the growth of cells with damaged, mutated DNA, which means that it protects organisms against tumour growth. However, senescent cells are not only proliferation-inhibited, they also show very different gene expression pattern and functionalities from their young, proliferating counterparts. In other words, the presence of even few senescent cells impacts on the surrounding tissue and these cells can change function of the organ they reside in, thus contributing to ageing. While the signals connecting DNA damage or telomere loss with proliferation arrest have been reasonably well characterized in recent years (and we have contributed to this), the whole network of signalling processes generating the complete senescent phenotype is still very much unclear, despite its obvious importance for the ageing process as a whole. We are convinced that a thorough characterisation of this network of signalling and response processes will not only provide ample clues to understand why old cells and organs are more frail and vulnerable to disease. It might also indicate possible targets for intervention, at the molecular level, in the cellular ageing process and thus contribute to postponing age-related disease. To study DNA damage responses and repair, we need technologies to measure accurately the timing of changes in a great number of factors possibly involved in the response, and of the interactions between them. This generates a vast number of data, and we need mathematical and statistical methods to integrate and evaluate these data and to draw conclusions from them. All such technologies have been established on-site over a number of years and are now ready to use. However, we also need a means to inflict DNA damage in a well-controlled fashion and at a defined point in time. Ionizing radiation is a well-accepted generator of DNA damage, and an X-ray irradiator is both most versatile (the characteristics of the radiation can easily be modified using different filters) and least hazardous (no permanently radioactive material involved). So far, the necessary equipment is only available off-site. This seriously compromises our ability to perform exact time-course analyses, as our results may become dependent on traffic conditions in town. Moreover, valuable research time is wasted on travel and logistics is complex. It is envisaged that a growing number of research groups on the Campus will become engaged in similar research projects within the next few years. An X-ray irradiator will thus remain an essential part of the research infrastructure on the Campus for the years to come.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/F029039/1
    Funder Contribution: 81,438 GBP
    Partners: MMU

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F066473/1
    Funder Contribution: 80,081 GBP
    Partners: University of Bedfordshire

    Images/videos have a promising future for figure animation, an entirely image/video-based approach would allow us to achieve high realism by directly utilising real images/videos. Unfortunately, making effective use of real world images/videos is not a simple task and it is very difficult to reconstruct 3D arbitrary views for human motion. Currently, the Image/Video Based Rendering(IVBR) achieves this by using either captured or adapted generic human geometry from 3D scanners or multi-cameras, which involves costly resources.In fact, the human brain has a strong in-built capacity to imagine motion from static objects. Given a few images of a human motion, we can easily interpret them by envisaging a virtual movement in our mind, without the need of any geometric information. However, existing computing technology still largely falls short of such a capability. Motivated by this observation, the proposed research is designed to take a highly speculative adventure which will explore novel techniques to equip computers with such an ability. Generally speaking, we shall look into the feasibility of making human characters alive from their static images, allowing arbitrary views of their movement to be directly reconstructed from a few key images without requiring their geometric models. While we target humans here, the methodology examined can be applicable to a broad range of articulated/non-articulated subjects. It will go beyond the current form of IVBR, which was mainly designed for objects with fixed shapes, and will aim to achieve what is traditionally feasible only with the assistance of geometric models. It could lead to an alternative that is fundamentally different from all current techniques.This feasibility study will concentrate only on the most fundamental issue of the entirely image based approach , which is the View Reconstruction for Humans (VRH), i.e. whether we can create images of a human movement under arbitrary viewpoints just from a few static images. To test the idea without losing generality, many datasets involved in our experiment will be created by computers. Once a solution to VRH is found, it will open the door to further investigation using real captured images for the training and also to work on other important issues concerning control, data organization & compression, image compositions, hair and cloth motion, etc., in follow-on projects. To allow for the completion of this feasibility study in a short period, we have designed a detailed research route. A learning-based approach will be taken to build statistical models for image sequences of human motion through training from existing examples. Subsequently, such models will be used to construct new sequences of human motion. While there are many potential ways to provide effective user controls, in order to stay focused on VRH, we shall take the most straightforward control strategy, which will use a selected number of images to indicate the key postures of the actor over the time. This is analogous to the key-frame control strategy that is widely adopted in animation.This research also has strong commercial potential in a broad range of entertainment-related businesses in areas such as image/video editing, computer games, the film industry, etc. They have a major presence in the UK and generate significant global income. It will be actively invovled by our industrial contacts at Antics Technologies and Cinesite. Cinesite is one of the largest companies in the production of computer visual effects and post production in the world, while Antics Technologies provides revolutionary software for full computer animation and has world-wide customers. They have recognized the potential market values of this research and will provide strong support through consultancy, evaluation and exploitation. Antics will provide their latest animation software release for this research at no cost.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/G000239/1
    Funder Contribution: 49,540 GBP
    Partners: UEA

    Desert dust can be picked up by strong winds and transported great distances, sometimes thousands of kilometres, through the atmosphere. This process has some interesting effects on the climate of our planet. Iron makes up a small portion of the dust and this element is often in short supply for the plants (phytoplankton) that live in the ocean. Wind-blown dust can be an important source of iron to these organisms in some ocean regions and so dust supply can be linked to phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon from the atmosphere that this causes. While in the atmosphere, dust also alters the way that radiation is absorbed or reflect by the planet. It is therefore important to include dust transport in models of the Earth's climate system, but our current understanding of this transport is rather poor. One particular difficulty is the lack of measurements available to help constrain and develop such models. Some long-term monitoring sites provide information on changes in dust transport over time, but they are too few and too widely spaced to give adequate information on spatial variability. The UEA group has recently carried out 10 long-transect crossings of the Atlantic Ocean, sampling the atmosphere for the iron content of aerosol and rain. This is a unique dataset and will allow us to assess the atmospheric input of iron to the Atlantic directly, based on field data, for the first time. The results of our study will be shared directly with modellers at the Hadley Centre and the QUEST Earth System Science programme, so that we can ensure that the benefit of this extra information is passed directly to the modelling community.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/G025177/1
    Funder Contribution: 51,229 GBP
    Partners: University of Leeds

    It is widely acknowledged that relatively small defects in software can have a substantial cost both for producers and consumers. For example, system vulnerabilities are frequently introduced by programming mistakes such as allowing out of bounds accesses to buffers, overflows in operations on native integers and other errors related to memory management. Of course, there can be other causes, such as system design flaws, but finding and certifying the absence of the low-level bugs is an important prerequisite to building secure and reliable software. The approach we use to detect and locate programming errors or certify the absence of such bugs is that of static analysis; that is, the determination of correct though approximate information about the program's values at each program step. Static analysis has its roots in compiler optimization where the analysis time has to be kept very low while the properties of interest are fixed with respect to the compiler. More recently program analyzers have been developed for program verification; however these also consider a fixed set of possible run-time errors and aim for a scalability and performance that enables them to tackle very large programs.Static analysis uses abstract domains for representing information that needs to be collected. Thus these domains have to provide a convenient but approximate representation of the accumulated information during the abstract evaluation of a program. Observe that the abstract domain component of a static analyzer has to include, not only a computer representation of the logical properties of interest, but also the operations needed to extract this information from the program's components, primitives for propagating this information forward and/or backward within the program, and operators for accelerating the analysis process and ensuring loop iterations actually terminate.Since, many program properties of interest are intrinsically numeric, there has been a considerable amount of research on how this kind of information can be represented efficiently and precisely by means of geometric domains. The problem being to get the right efficiency/precision trade-off, which is difficult since this is clearly dependent on the application. Thus many geometric domains have been proposed and researched, the majority being defined by linear (i.e., planar) bounds such as polyhedra; octagons; boxes, also known as intervals; and grids, simple forms of which are also called lattices. Such a range is needed since domains such as polyhedra, although very precise, have high complexity and exponential space requirements (relative to the number of dimensions) while simpler domains such as octagons and grids are polynomial and the non-relational domain of boxes has linear complexity.Solving this scalability problem is the main motivation for this project; here we will research new techniques for building compound geometric domains that can be constructed from several atomic ones such as those discussed above. In order to allow for varying the efficiency/precision trade-off, not only will it be parametrized on the component domains but it will also have a highly adjustable strategy for varying the kind and amount of communication between them. Thus a successful project will provide bespoke domains that are tailored for the application, allowing for both the type of property being verified and the size and complexity of the software being analyzed.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/E055141/1
    Funder Contribution: 7,566 GBP
    Partners: Brunel University

    This feasibility study explores the relationship between program slices and faults. The aim is to investigate whether the characteristics of program slices can be used to identify fault-prone code hotspots. Slicing metrics and dependence clusters are used to characterise the slices in a software component. The relationship between the characteristics of those slices in the component and the faults in that component are then analysed. Identifying fault-prone code is difficult and reliable predictors of fault-proneness are not widely reported in the literature. Program slicing is an established software engineering technique to support the detection and correction of known faults. Once a problem has emerged, slicing enables all statements that could have caused that problem to be identified and extracted. This extracted code makes the identification and removal of the fault much easier. We propose to investigate whether slicing could also be a good predictor of latent faults that have not yet caused a problem. The results of this study will show whether the use of program slicing can be extended as a reliable tool to predict fault-prone code. Our previous proof of concept study suggests that this investigation is viable and that slicing may offer valuable insights into fault-proneness.

Advanced search in
Projects
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Searching FieldsTerms
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arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
919 Projects, page 1 of 92
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/F034717/1
    Funder Contribution: 81,802 GBP
    Partners: University of Salford

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/D039053/2
    Funder Contribution: 37,380 GBP
    Partners: Imperial College London

    This project concerns the valuation and hedging of certain financial derivatives, American and barrier options. A barrier option is a derivative that is activated or extinguished if a certain rate, asset price or index crosses a specified level. An American option on a stock is a contract that gives its holder the right to exercise it at any time before expiry and receive then a certain payment from the seller, which may depend on the price of the stock at that moment. As American and barrier options are widely traded in financal markets, accurate valuation and hedging of American and barrier options are important issues.By their nature the valuation of American and barrier options is generally more involved than that of standard European options such as calls and puts: for example there is no known closed form solution for the value of an American put even under the simplifying assumptions of the classical Black-Scholes model. For valuation and hedging of these contracts one therefore has to resort to approximations. The aim of the proposed research is to make a contribution to the development of new algorithms and to investigate their mathematical properties, especially in the context of more realistic pricing models than the classical Black-Scholes model.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F033826/1
    Funder Contribution: 16,534 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    Recently, with the unfortunate emergence of bio-terrorism and its threat to both military targets and civilian populations, it is necessary to develop a portable and cheap system to continuously monitor for any potential aerosolized agents (biological particles) released from deadly biological weapons in any open area, even in harsh environments. As most bio-molecules show strong absorption in the ultra-violet (UV) spectral region ranging from 280 to 340 nm, an efficient UV lighting source is expected to be a crucial component for next-generation biological detection, biological imaging and disease analysis applications. In particular use of UV laser diodes would enable high sensitivity detection systems. III-nitride semiconductors are the best materials to make such laser diodes. In last decade, there have been major achievements in this area. However, the achievements are limited to the violet/blue spectral region, with those devices mainly based on the InGaN alloy. Due to a number of challenges in material growth, a 343 nm laser diode is the shortest one so far reported. Obviously, such a laser diode is not short enough to be employable for above applications.Target of this exploratory project is the development of the first 337 nm UV laser diode based on the GaN/AlGaN material system to replace currently used N2 gas-based lasers. This work is based on recent major advances of the here involved UK teams in the field of III-nitride semiconductors. Further applications of the technology involve biological imaging as an efficient method to detect diseases in a human body, for example, cancerous tissues.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/E023967/1
    Funder Contribution: 228,296 GBP
    Partners: University of Salford

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Project . 2008 - 2009
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/F010966/1
    Funder Contribution: 131,134 GBP
    Partners: Newcastle University, Gulmay Medical Limited

    Aging of cells and organisms is largely determined by damage to cellular molecules, the efficiency of damage repair and the cellular mechanisms of response and adaptation to the remaining damage. We are primarily interested in the mechanisms and the importance of cellular senescence, which is the permanent loss of the ability of cells to divide and growth. Damage to DNA, either in the form of loss of telomeres (the very ends of all chromosomes), or of DNA breaks, is a major trigger of cellular senescence. Thus, senescence prevents the growth of cells with damaged, mutated DNA, which means that it protects organisms against tumour growth. However, senescent cells are not only proliferation-inhibited, they also show very different gene expression pattern and functionalities from their young, proliferating counterparts. In other words, the presence of even few senescent cells impacts on the surrounding tissue and these cells can change function of the organ they reside in, thus contributing to ageing. While the signals connecting DNA damage or telomere loss with proliferation arrest have been reasonably well characterized in recent years (and we have contributed to this), the whole network of signalling processes generating the complete senescent phenotype is still very much unclear, despite its obvious importance for the ageing process as a whole. We are convinced that a thorough characterisation of this network of signalling and response processes will not only provide ample clues to understand why old cells and organs are more frail and vulnerable to disease. It might also indicate possible targets for intervention, at the molecular level, in the cellular ageing process and thus contribute to postponing age-related disease. To study DNA damage responses and repair, we need technologies to measure accurately the timing of changes in a great number of factors possibly involved in the response, and of the interactions between them. This generates a vast number of data, and we need mathematical and statistical methods to integrate and evaluate these data and to draw conclusions from them. All such technologies have been established on-site over a number of years and are now ready to use. However, we also need a means to inflict DNA damage in a well-controlled fashion and at a defined point in time. Ionizing radiation is a well-accepted generator of DNA damage, and an X-ray irradiator is both most versatile (the characteristics of the radiation can easily be modified using different filters) and least hazardous (no permanently radioactive material involved). So far, the necessary equipment is only available off-site. This seriously compromises our ability to perform exact time-course analyses, as our results may become dependent on traffic conditions in town. Moreover, valuable research time is wasted on travel and logistics is complex. It is envisaged that a growing number of research groups on the Campus will become engaged in similar research projects within the next few years. An X-ray irradiator will thus remain an essential part of the research infrastructure on the Campus for the years to come.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ES/F029039/1
    Funder Contribution: 81,438 GBP
    Partners: MMU

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F066473/1
    Funder Contribution: 80,081 GBP
    Partners: University of Bedfordshire

    Images/videos have a promising future for figure animation, an entirely image/video-based approach would allow us to achieve high realism by directly utilising real images/videos. Unfortunately, making effective use of real world images/videos is not a simple task and it is very difficult to reconstruct 3D arbitrary views for human motion. Currently, the Image/Video Based Rendering(IVBR) achieves this by using either captured or adapted generic human geometry from 3D scanners or multi-cameras, which involves costly resources.In fact, the human brain has a strong in-built capacity to imagine motion from static objects. Given a few images of a human motion, we can easily interpret them by envisaging a virtual movement in our mind, without the need of any geometric information. However, existing computing technology still largely falls short of such a capability. Motivated by this observation, the proposed research is designed to take a highly speculative adventure which will explore novel techniques to equip computers with such an ability. Generally speaking, we shall look into the feasibility of making human characters alive from their static images, allowing arbitrary views of their movement to be directly reconstructed from a few key images without requiring their geometric models. While we target humans here, the methodology examined can be applicable to a broad range of articulated/non-articulated subjects. It will go beyond the current form of IVBR, which was mainly designed for objects with fixed shapes, and will aim to achieve what is traditionally feasible only with the assistance of geometric models. It could lead to an alternative that is fundamentally different from all current techniques.This feasibility study will concentrate only on the most fundamental issue of the entirely image based approach , which is the View Reconstruction for Humans (VRH), i.e. whether we can create images of a human movement under arbitrary viewpoints just from a few static images. To test the idea without losing generality, many datasets involved in our experiment will be created by computers. Once a solution to VRH is found, it will open the door to further investigation using real captured images for the training and also to work on other important issues concerning control, data organization & compression, image compositions, hair and cloth motion, etc., in follow-on projects. To allow for the completion of this feasibility study in a short period, we have designed a detailed research route. A learning-based approach will be taken to build statistical models for image sequences of human motion through training from existing examples. Subsequently, such models will be used to construct new sequences of human motion. While there are many potential ways to provide effective user controls, in order to stay focused on VRH, we shall take the most straightforward control strategy, which will use a selected number of images to indicate the key postures of the actor over the time. This is analogous to the key-frame control strategy that is widely adopted in animation.This research also has strong commercial potential in a broad range of entertainment-related businesses in areas such as image/video editing, computer games, the film industry, etc. They have a major presence in the UK and generate significant global income. It will be actively invovled by our industrial contacts at Antics Technologies and Cinesite. Cinesite is one of the largest companies in the production of computer visual effects and post production in the world, while Antics Technologies provides revolutionary software for full computer animation and has world-wide customers. They have recognized the potential market values of this research and will provide strong support through consultancy, evaluation and exploitation. Antics will provide their latest animation software release for this research at no cost.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/G000239/1
    Funder Contribution: 49,540 GBP
    Partners: UEA

    Desert dust can be picked up by strong winds and transported great distances, sometimes thousands of kilometres, through the atmosphere. This process has some interesting effects on the climate of our planet. Iron makes up a small portion of the dust and this element is often in short supply for the plants (phytoplankton) that live in the ocean. Wind-blown dust can be an important source of iron to these organisms in some ocean regions and so dust supply can be linked to phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon from the atmosphere that this causes. While in the atmosphere, dust also alters the way that radiation is absorbed or reflect by the planet. It is therefore important to include dust transport in models of the Earth's climate system, but our current understanding of this transport is rather poor. One particular difficulty is the lack of measurements available to help constrain and develop such models. Some long-term monitoring sites provide information on changes in dust transport over time, but they are too few and too widely spaced to give adequate information on spatial variability. The UEA group has recently carried out 10 long-transect crossings of the Atlantic Ocean, sampling the atmosphere for the iron content of aerosol and rain. This is a unique dataset and will allow us to assess the atmospheric input of iron to the Atlantic directly, based on field data, for the first time. The results of our study will be shared directly with modellers at the Hadley Centre and the QUEST Earth System Science programme, so that we can ensure that the benefit of this extra information is passed directly to the modelling community.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/G025177/1
    Funder Contribution: 51,229 GBP
    Partners: University of Leeds

    It is widely acknowledged that relatively small defects in software can have a substantial cost both for producers and consumers. For example, system vulnerabilities are frequently introduced by programming mistakes such as allowing out of bounds accesses to buffers, overflows in operations on native integers and other errors related to memory management. Of course, there can be other causes, such as system design flaws, but finding and certifying the absence of the low-level bugs is an important prerequisite to building secure and reliable software. The approach we use to detect and locate programming errors or certify the absence of such bugs is that of static analysis; that is, the determination of correct though approximate information about the program's values at each program step. Static analysis has its roots in compiler optimization where the analysis time has to be kept very low while the properties of interest are fixed with respect to the compiler. More recently program analyzers have been developed for program verification; however these also consider a fixed set of possible run-time errors and aim for a scalability and performance that enables them to tackle very large programs.Static analysis uses abstract domains for representing information that needs to be collected. Thus these domains have to provide a convenient but approximate representation of the accumulated information during the abstract evaluation of a program. Observe that the abstract domain component of a static analyzer has to include, not only a computer representation of the logical properties of interest, but also the operations needed to extract this information from the program's components, primitives for propagating this information forward and/or backward within the program, and operators for accelerating the analysis process and ensuring loop iterations actually terminate.Since, many program properties of interest are intrinsically numeric, there has been a considerable amount of research on how this kind of information can be represented efficiently and precisely by means of geometric domains. The problem being to get the right efficiency/precision trade-off, which is difficult since this is clearly dependent on the application. Thus many geometric domains have been proposed and researched, the majority being defined by linear (i.e., planar) bounds such as polyhedra; octagons; boxes, also known as intervals; and grids, simple forms of which are also called lattices. Such a range is needed since domains such as polyhedra, although very precise, have high complexity and exponential space requirements (relative to the number of dimensions) while simpler domains such as octagons and grids are polynomial and the non-relational domain of boxes has linear complexity.Solving this scalability problem is the main motivation for this project; here we will research new techniques for building compound geometric domains that can be constructed from several atomic ones such as those discussed above. In order to allow for varying the efficiency/precision trade-off, not only will it be parametrized on the component domains but it will also have a highly adjustable strategy for varying the kind and amount of communication between them. Thus a successful project will provide bespoke domains that are tailored for the application, allowing for both the type of property being verified and the size and complexity of the software being analyzed.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/E055141/1
    Funder Contribution: 7,566 GBP
    Partners: Brunel University

    This feasibility study explores the relationship between program slices and faults. The aim is to investigate whether the characteristics of program slices can be used to identify fault-prone code hotspots. Slicing metrics and dependence clusters are used to characterise the slices in a software component. The relationship between the characteristics of those slices in the component and the faults in that component are then analysed. Identifying fault-prone code is difficult and reliable predictors of fault-proneness are not widely reported in the literature. Program slicing is an established software engineering technique to support the detection and correction of known faults. Once a problem has emerged, slicing enables all statements that could have caused that problem to be identified and extracted. This extracted code makes the identification and removal of the fault much easier. We propose to investigate whether slicing could also be a good predictor of latent faults that have not yet caused a problem. The results of this study will show whether the use of program slicing can be extended as a reliable tool to predict fault-prone code. Our previous proof of concept study suggests that this investigation is viable and that slicing may offer valuable insights into fault-proneness.

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