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1,605 Projects, page 1 of 161

  • UK Research and Innovation
  • 2007

10
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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/E004059/1
    Funder Contribution: 25,073 GBP
    Partners: University of Dundee

    When philosophers say that film 'can think', all too often what is meant is that it is capable of illustrating philosophical concepts. Film is used by philosophy, especially when philosophy tells us what film is: it fixes film in a set of ontological categories. This project in 'Film, Philosophy, and The Cinematic Event' proposes to explore the set of issues that surround the relationship between film and philosophy with a view to assessing whether cinema can only ever illustrate extant philosophy or whether it can also create new philosophy without the proxy of a guiding subject. \n\nThe primary objective of the research is to establish the possibility of film as an event, a becoming that enfolds within its moment a multiplicity of properties that cannot be set into any philosophically-informed ontological hierarchy (of artist over audience, of material medium over author's intention, of audience reception over genre convention, and so on). In place of philosophical illustration by film, there is the becoming-philosophical of film itself, that which resists any singular, reductive theorisation of its evental being. An ecumenical position is espoused; a pluralistic approach to film as textual and material artefact, visual cognition and ontological world-view, art-work and consumer product. This ecumenism stems from film itself being a becoming-art, an event that resists an essence, that resists theory. The resistance of film to (any one) theory is itself theoretically rich and forces us to rethink, not just our ontology of film, but consequently what philosophy is as well. Film itself can make us think by refusing to allow us us enforce our thoughts (of what it is) on it.\n\nThe current situation in film-philosophy can be separated broadly into two rival approaches that would take film interpretation in only one direction. Chapter 1 attempts to negotiate the contrary claims of such paradigms. On the one side, Culturalism, which term I'll use to cover the broad sweep of culture- and text-based approaches to the technology, ideology and/or materiality of production, distribution, and consumption of film. It is often influenced by philosophies coming from the 'Continental' school, psychodynamics, critical theory, historicism, and hermeneutics. On the other side is Cognitivism, which takes empirical psychology as its modus operandi and is also often inspired by Analytical and linguistic philosophy. It sees film meaning primarily in terms of representation, and tends to be scientistic, apolitical (in aspiration), and naturalistic. The philosophical axioms informing the choice of philosophical paradigm, Culturalism and Cognitivism, will then be critiqued for the totalising and question begging nature of their relationship with film. \n\nChapter 2 will focus on three specific cases of film-philosophy in terms of how they manipulate film in the name of theory: the film-theorist David Bordwell's cognitive-philosophical approach, Alain Badiou's subtractive ontological approach, and the materialist rhizomatics of Gilles Deleuze. The methodology used will be metatheoretical and comparative, by which I mean that the various approaches to film and philosophy will be tackled through a disparate range of examples, which these three represent. It will be argued in each case that these film-philosophies always involve the mix of an a priori theory that construes specific films or aspects of film per se in order to prove (illustrate) their own theory in a circular manner.\n\nChapter 3, finally, aims to explore how film can, indeed, think for itself, by resisting and reforming our philosophical presuppositions through its social, technological, narrative, visual, and auditory structures in all their evental hybridity. A number of case studies will be offered, looking at how various films can reform numerous philosophical categories, not through any explicit theory, but in their multiple, evental being.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0100151
    Funder Contribution: 1,320,900 GBP
    Partners: University of Sheffield

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/E510671/1
    Funder Contribution: 14,538 GBP
    Partners: University of Dundee

    Charmed: Can jewellery tell us what we want from wearable technology? Research into wearable computing tends to be undertaken by Product Designers and Engineers in an effort to enable ubiquitous computing: email at the top of a mountain. Rather than miniaturising office and communication systems, this project aims to discover what new kinds of interactivity might be relevant to users in a wearable device. This research project uses a charm bracelet as a research tool. The charm bracelet with its familiarity and associations may be a user-friendly way of discovering what would be useful and meaningful in wearable computing. The metaphor of the charm is a useful one, as charms are added to a bracelet over time and have specific 'powers' or significance: from protecting the wearer from evil to bringing luck and reminding the wearer of a loved one. Participants in the project will be asked to wear a bracelet, neckpiece or tie-pin featuring of a series of interchangeable 'charms' over a period of weeks. Charms can be added to or removed and wearers can add their own objects. Qualitative data will be gathered using cultural probes and interview to ascertain what 'powers' (interactive capabilities) participants would assign to their charms. The project combines the insights of jewellery design: wear ability, personal attachment and value with user-centered design: inviting the wearer to contribute their insights to the development of products. The findings will suggest new design opportunities for interactive jewellery devices, which will be the basis for a larger project to develop these ideas into working prototypes.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0200454
    Funder Contribution: 614,267 GBP
    Partners: University of Oxford

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/D008301/1
    Funder Contribution: 39,050 GBP
    Partners: University of York

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are among the most widespread and ecologically significant of all soil micro-organisms. These soil fungi form symbiotic associations with around two-thirds of all land plants (some 200 000 species) in which both partners benefit. The plant obtains enhanced phosphorus uptake and other benefits such as increased pathogen resistance while the fungus receives a supply of carbon from its host plant. In addition, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known to influence plant community structure and nutrient cycling in natural ecosystems as well as releasing large amounts of respiratory CO2 into the surrounding soil, which ultimately diffuses into the atmosphere (contributing to the greenhouse effect). It is therefore surprising that we know relatively little about how this influential group of fungi respond to conditions in the environment. Temperature is one such key environmental variable because it effects metabolic processes, can show wide variation (i.e. day and night, winter and summer) and is predicted to increase as a result of global climate change. Although we do know how plants respond to variations in temperature, most studies on have been conducted using non-mycorrhizal (i.e. uncolonised) plants whereas in the natural environment AMF colonisation is the normal condition. In this proposal we will investigate how the AMF is influenced by temperature by measuring respiration. We will examine how AMF influence the respiration response of the plants root (compared to uncolonised roots). In addition, the AMF has two phases, one inside the root, and the other external to the root responsible for exploring the soil for nutrients. If both these phases respond to temperature in the same manner is currently unknown. We will vary the temperature experienced by the external phase independently of that of the plant so that the response of the AMF can be examined directly. We will also test if the fungus is able to adjust (i.e. acclimate) to changes in temperature such that respiration is maintained in a steady state rather than changing.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/D500117/1
    Funder Contribution: 19,813 GBP
    Partners: NTU

    The book explores a critical juncture in contemporary French society, between the perceived end of secularism and the beginning of a post-secular age. In detail the relationship between secularism and the rise of sexual liberation over the course of les Trent gloriousness and afterwards. In particular, I analyse how the Catholicism reacted to sexual freedom and modernity, both ethically and theologically. The polarisation of the church and secularism over this period confirmed an emerging consensus that modernity was commensurate with secular ideas of individualism, freedom, and sexual liberation. Progress, in short, was on the side of secularism; religion was synonymous with pre-modernity and sexual repression. This consensus was challenged most notably by Marcel Gauchet in his seminal work Le Desenchantement du monde (i 985) which heralded the return to religion because of a perceived disenchantment with secularism and modernity. For Gauchet, this return did not mean a return to orthodoxy but a return to religion rekindled in the light of social and progressive democratic values and in tune with individual aspirations. This return to religion has ushered in the beginning of a post-secular age. On the one hand, post-secularism represents a challenge to orthodox Catholicism and democratic republicanism by privileging individual will, autonomy and private interest over divine law and collective interest. On the other hand, it has brought religion in from the cold of modernity, made it matter, and offered a new dimension to citizens' lives which they now want reflected in their wider claims to citizenship. The critical issue for my book is the interface between sexual difference and religion in this post-secular context. If secularism paved the way for a greater accommodation between sexual difference and social democracy, post-secularism offers a potentially new but problematic accommodation between sexuality and religion Aims and Objectives: The historical context of this monograph is the tension between the Church's theological discourse of resistance to gay sexuality (60s/70s), and a secular culture characterised by sexual liberation and increasing gay visibility. The analysis will focus on the shifting secular and religious perceptions of sexuality in French society in the 80s and 90s, the recent debates on a 'retour du religieux' and the emergence of religion as a new player in debates on citizenship. 1 aim to show how Catholic theology (traditionally resistant to gay sexuality) has been reinforced under recent pontificates, but also challenged in a post-secular France by alternative and radical theological thinking inflected by social diversity, and political and sexual democratisation. To achieve this over-arching aim, I intend to: evaluate the historical relationship between Christian theology and gay sexuality in the context of secular modernity in France engage with traditional theological discourses on gay sexuality establish the key elements of the 'post-secular' debate analyse the effects of post secularism explore the emergence of alternative theological discourses in the construction of gay sexuality evaluate the reception and contribution of theological debates on gay sexuality in the contexts of French republicanism, democracy and citizenship engage critically with debates on sexual ethics in France Potential Applications and Benefits: The originality of this research lies in its location at a critical juncture of theological and philosophical change, in the critical contribution of theology to the currency of lesbian and gay sexuality, and in the implications for gay sexual ethics.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: RES-000-23-1459
    Funder Contribution: 120,107 GBP
    Partners: QUB

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/E500323/1
    Funder Contribution: 11,255 GBP
    Partners: University of London

    Touching and object handling in museums and galleries can be one of the most rewarding aspects of a visit. Physical interaction with museum objects, artefacts, specimens, artworks, manuscripts or other archives occurs in a variety of circumstances through access to handling boxes, museum-based workshops or other educational visits, outreach and specific handling collections. Anecdotal evidence overwhelmingly supports the value of object handling giving rise to a range of positive emotions and feelings, from simple enjoyment to specific learning outcomes. It is perhaps surprising to know that there is very little evidence to support this belief within the heritage sector, including museums and galleries.Across schools, colleges and universities museums objects play a key role in learning and objects are used to transfer subject specific information, observation, practical and drawing skills. In the broader context objects serve to inspire, inform and educate. Thus, our understanding of how this information is acquired is critical to planning and improving access to collections and their interpretation.\n\nThe aim of the project is to bring together a diverse range of experts from academic and museum environments, with a view to establishing a network where information relating to the value of object handling can be shared and developed. Participants in the project come from a variety of backgrounds and bring with them a diverse range of expertise, research interests and museum access requirements. Scientists will share their knowledge of the underlying psychological and neurological mechanisms behind touch and sensation. Museum staff will discuss the types of practical applications of touch employed in museum such as interactive displays, handling boxes and new technologies for interpreting objects. The union of these two groups will afford the opportunity to understand the true value of object handling and provide the museum world will a valuable toolkit for improving access and interpretation.\n\nThe key objective of the project is to define mechanisms for measuring the value of object handling for a range of audiences including: non-specialists, disadvantaged people such as hospital patients, visually impaired, deaf and elderly people, and students enrolled in formal and informal education. Special discussion sessions will seek to explore different methods for assessing the value of object handling, be they oral interviews, questionnaires or biosensors and other technologies. Where appropriate these methods will be trialled; for example, a related project at University College London Hospitals will use the results of these discussions to determine ways of evaluating a handling box based around reminiscence for use by hospital patients.\n\nThe results of this project will take form of an edited book volume, containing chapters based on the workshops, seminars and discussions, which form the basis of the project. The volume will be widely disseminated across the museum world and it is hoped will lead to future research experimenting with different methods for assessing the value of object handling. Many of the participants from museums are in the process of developing new resources and this research will feed directly into these developments. Furthermore, the volume will provide a useful guide for museum's who are developing their access and interpretation strategies, with a view to enhancing the object handling opportunities currently available in museums and galleries.\n

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: RES-000-22-1667
    Funder Contribution: 47,124 GBP
    Partners: GOLDSMITHS'

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0001259
    Funder Contribution: 857,900 GBP
    Partners: University of Sussex

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

Advanced search in
Projects
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
1,605 Projects, page 1 of 161
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/E004059/1
    Funder Contribution: 25,073 GBP
    Partners: University of Dundee

    When philosophers say that film 'can think', all too often what is meant is that it is capable of illustrating philosophical concepts. Film is used by philosophy, especially when philosophy tells us what film is: it fixes film in a set of ontological categories. This project in 'Film, Philosophy, and The Cinematic Event' proposes to explore the set of issues that surround the relationship between film and philosophy with a view to assessing whether cinema can only ever illustrate extant philosophy or whether it can also create new philosophy without the proxy of a guiding subject. \n\nThe primary objective of the research is to establish the possibility of film as an event, a becoming that enfolds within its moment a multiplicity of properties that cannot be set into any philosophically-informed ontological hierarchy (of artist over audience, of material medium over author's intention, of audience reception over genre convention, and so on). In place of philosophical illustration by film, there is the becoming-philosophical of film itself, that which resists any singular, reductive theorisation of its evental being. An ecumenical position is espoused; a pluralistic approach to film as textual and material artefact, visual cognition and ontological world-view, art-work and consumer product. This ecumenism stems from film itself being a becoming-art, an event that resists an essence, that resists theory. The resistance of film to (any one) theory is itself theoretically rich and forces us to rethink, not just our ontology of film, but consequently what philosophy is as well. Film itself can make us think by refusing to allow us us enforce our thoughts (of what it is) on it.\n\nThe current situation in film-philosophy can be separated broadly into two rival approaches that would take film interpretation in only one direction. Chapter 1 attempts to negotiate the contrary claims of such paradigms. On the one side, Culturalism, which term I'll use to cover the broad sweep of culture- and text-based approaches to the technology, ideology and/or materiality of production, distribution, and consumption of film. It is often influenced by philosophies coming from the 'Continental' school, psychodynamics, critical theory, historicism, and hermeneutics. On the other side is Cognitivism, which takes empirical psychology as its modus operandi and is also often inspired by Analytical and linguistic philosophy. It sees film meaning primarily in terms of representation, and tends to be scientistic, apolitical (in aspiration), and naturalistic. The philosophical axioms informing the choice of philosophical paradigm, Culturalism and Cognitivism, will then be critiqued for the totalising and question begging nature of their relationship with film. \n\nChapter 2 will focus on three specific cases of film-philosophy in terms of how they manipulate film in the name of theory: the film-theorist David Bordwell's cognitive-philosophical approach, Alain Badiou's subtractive ontological approach, and the materialist rhizomatics of Gilles Deleuze. The methodology used will be metatheoretical and comparative, by which I mean that the various approaches to film and philosophy will be tackled through a disparate range of examples, which these three represent. It will be argued in each case that these film-philosophies always involve the mix of an a priori theory that construes specific films or aspects of film per se in order to prove (illustrate) their own theory in a circular manner.\n\nChapter 3, finally, aims to explore how film can, indeed, think for itself, by resisting and reforming our philosophical presuppositions through its social, technological, narrative, visual, and auditory structures in all their evental hybridity. A number of case studies will be offered, looking at how various films can reform numerous philosophical categories, not through any explicit theory, but in their multiple, evental being.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0100151
    Funder Contribution: 1,320,900 GBP
    Partners: University of Sheffield

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/E510671/1
    Funder Contribution: 14,538 GBP
    Partners: University of Dundee

    Charmed: Can jewellery tell us what we want from wearable technology? Research into wearable computing tends to be undertaken by Product Designers and Engineers in an effort to enable ubiquitous computing: email at the top of a mountain. Rather than miniaturising office and communication systems, this project aims to discover what new kinds of interactivity might be relevant to users in a wearable device. This research project uses a charm bracelet as a research tool. The charm bracelet with its familiarity and associations may be a user-friendly way of discovering what would be useful and meaningful in wearable computing. The metaphor of the charm is a useful one, as charms are added to a bracelet over time and have specific 'powers' or significance: from protecting the wearer from evil to bringing luck and reminding the wearer of a loved one. Participants in the project will be asked to wear a bracelet, neckpiece or tie-pin featuring of a series of interchangeable 'charms' over a period of weeks. Charms can be added to or removed and wearers can add their own objects. Qualitative data will be gathered using cultural probes and interview to ascertain what 'powers' (interactive capabilities) participants would assign to their charms. The project combines the insights of jewellery design: wear ability, personal attachment and value with user-centered design: inviting the wearer to contribute their insights to the development of products. The findings will suggest new design opportunities for interactive jewellery devices, which will be the basis for a larger project to develop these ideas into working prototypes.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0200454
    Funder Contribution: 614,267 GBP
    Partners: University of Oxford

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/D008301/1
    Funder Contribution: 39,050 GBP
    Partners: University of York

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are among the most widespread and ecologically significant of all soil micro-organisms. These soil fungi form symbiotic associations with around two-thirds of all land plants (some 200 000 species) in which both partners benefit. The plant obtains enhanced phosphorus uptake and other benefits such as increased pathogen resistance while the fungus receives a supply of carbon from its host plant. In addition, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known to influence plant community structure and nutrient cycling in natural ecosystems as well as releasing large amounts of respiratory CO2 into the surrounding soil, which ultimately diffuses into the atmosphere (contributing to the greenhouse effect). It is therefore surprising that we know relatively little about how this influential group of fungi respond to conditions in the environment. Temperature is one such key environmental variable because it effects metabolic processes, can show wide variation (i.e. day and night, winter and summer) and is predicted to increase as a result of global climate change. Although we do know how plants respond to variations in temperature, most studies on have been conducted using non-mycorrhizal (i.e. uncolonised) plants whereas in the natural environment AMF colonisation is the normal condition. In this proposal we will investigate how the AMF is influenced by temperature by measuring respiration. We will examine how AMF influence the respiration response of the plants root (compared to uncolonised roots). In addition, the AMF has two phases, one inside the root, and the other external to the root responsible for exploring the soil for nutrients. If both these phases respond to temperature in the same manner is currently unknown. We will vary the temperature experienced by the external phase independently of that of the plant so that the response of the AMF can be examined directly. We will also test if the fungus is able to adjust (i.e. acclimate) to changes in temperature such that respiration is maintained in a steady state rather than changing.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/D500117/1
    Funder Contribution: 19,813 GBP
    Partners: NTU

    The book explores a critical juncture in contemporary French society, between the perceived end of secularism and the beginning of a post-secular age. In detail the relationship between secularism and the rise of sexual liberation over the course of les Trent gloriousness and afterwards. In particular, I analyse how the Catholicism reacted to sexual freedom and modernity, both ethically and theologically. The polarisation of the church and secularism over this period confirmed an emerging consensus that modernity was commensurate with secular ideas of individualism, freedom, and sexual liberation. Progress, in short, was on the side of secularism; religion was synonymous with pre-modernity and sexual repression. This consensus was challenged most notably by Marcel Gauchet in his seminal work Le Desenchantement du monde (i 985) which heralded the return to religion because of a perceived disenchantment with secularism and modernity. For Gauchet, this return did not mean a return to orthodoxy but a return to religion rekindled in the light of social and progressive democratic values and in tune with individual aspirations. This return to religion has ushered in the beginning of a post-secular age. On the one hand, post-secularism represents a challenge to orthodox Catholicism and democratic republicanism by privileging individual will, autonomy and private interest over divine law and collective interest. On the other hand, it has brought religion in from the cold of modernity, made it matter, and offered a new dimension to citizens' lives which they now want reflected in their wider claims to citizenship. The critical issue for my book is the interface between sexual difference and religion in this post-secular context. If secularism paved the way for a greater accommodation between sexual difference and social democracy, post-secularism offers a potentially new but problematic accommodation between sexuality and religion Aims and Objectives: The historical context of this monograph is the tension between the Church's theological discourse of resistance to gay sexuality (60s/70s), and a secular culture characterised by sexual liberation and increasing gay visibility. The analysis will focus on the shifting secular and religious perceptions of sexuality in French society in the 80s and 90s, the recent debates on a 'retour du religieux' and the emergence of religion as a new player in debates on citizenship. 1 aim to show how Catholic theology (traditionally resistant to gay sexuality) has been reinforced under recent pontificates, but also challenged in a post-secular France by alternative and radical theological thinking inflected by social diversity, and political and sexual democratisation. To achieve this over-arching aim, I intend to: evaluate the historical relationship between Christian theology and gay sexuality in the context of secular modernity in France engage with traditional theological discourses on gay sexuality establish the key elements of the 'post-secular' debate analyse the effects of post secularism explore the emergence of alternative theological discourses in the construction of gay sexuality evaluate the reception and contribution of theological debates on gay sexuality in the contexts of French republicanism, democracy and citizenship engage critically with debates on sexual ethics in France Potential Applications and Benefits: The originality of this research lies in its location at a critical juncture of theological and philosophical change, in the critical contribution of theology to the currency of lesbian and gay sexuality, and in the implications for gay sexual ethics.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: RES-000-23-1459
    Funder Contribution: 120,107 GBP
    Partners: QUB

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/E500323/1
    Funder Contribution: 11,255 GBP
    Partners: University of London

    Touching and object handling in museums and galleries can be one of the most rewarding aspects of a visit. Physical interaction with museum objects, artefacts, specimens, artworks, manuscripts or other archives occurs in a variety of circumstances through access to handling boxes, museum-based workshops or other educational visits, outreach and specific handling collections. Anecdotal evidence overwhelmingly supports the value of object handling giving rise to a range of positive emotions and feelings, from simple enjoyment to specific learning outcomes. It is perhaps surprising to know that there is very little evidence to support this belief within the heritage sector, including museums and galleries.Across schools, colleges and universities museums objects play a key role in learning and objects are used to transfer subject specific information, observation, practical and drawing skills. In the broader context objects serve to inspire, inform and educate. Thus, our understanding of how this information is acquired is critical to planning and improving access to collections and their interpretation.\n\nThe aim of the project is to bring together a diverse range of experts from academic and museum environments, with a view to establishing a network where information relating to the value of object handling can be shared and developed. Participants in the project come from a variety of backgrounds and bring with them a diverse range of expertise, research interests and museum access requirements. Scientists will share their knowledge of the underlying psychological and neurological mechanisms behind touch and sensation. Museum staff will discuss the types of practical applications of touch employed in museum such as interactive displays, handling boxes and new technologies for interpreting objects. The union of these two groups will afford the opportunity to understand the true value of object handling and provide the museum world will a valuable toolkit for improving access and interpretation.\n\nThe key objective of the project is to define mechanisms for measuring the value of object handling for a range of audiences including: non-specialists, disadvantaged people such as hospital patients, visually impaired, deaf and elderly people, and students enrolled in formal and informal education. Special discussion sessions will seek to explore different methods for assessing the value of object handling, be they oral interviews, questionnaires or biosensors and other technologies. Where appropriate these methods will be trialled; for example, a related project at University College London Hospitals will use the results of these discussions to determine ways of evaluating a handling box based around reminiscence for use by hospital patients.\n\nThe results of this project will take form of an edited book volume, containing chapters based on the workshops, seminars and discussions, which form the basis of the project. The volume will be widely disseminated across the museum world and it is hoped will lead to future research experimenting with different methods for assessing the value of object handling. Many of the participants from museums are in the process of developing new resources and this research will feed directly into these developments. Furthermore, the volume will provide a useful guide for museum's who are developing their access and interpretation strategies, with a view to enhancing the object handling opportunities currently available in museums and galleries.\n

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: RES-000-22-1667
    Funder Contribution: 47,124 GBP
    Partners: GOLDSMITHS'

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0001259
    Funder Contribution: 857,900 GBP
    Partners: University of Sussex

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

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