Advanced search in
Projects
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
472 Projects, page 1 of 48

  • UK Research and Innovation
  • UKRI|AHRC
  • 2008

10
arrow_drop_down
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F006101/1
    Funder Contribution: 25,953 GBP
    Partners: QMUL

    The aim of this application for funding is to support the completion of a short critical monograph assessing the Heimat film trilogy by Edgar Reitz. This would be the first book-length study in either English or German to offer a comprehensive assessment and critical analysis of Reitz's major work. The Heimat trilogy comprises a linked project of three film series which chronicles extensively everyday life in a fictional west German village and, in Die zweite Heimat/Heimat 2 (1992), also student life in the city of Munich, between 1919 and 2000. Reitz began shooting in the late 1970s for the first Heimat (1984) and completed his project with Heimat 3 in 2004, which itself was augmented recently with an Epilogue (Heimat Fragmente) shown at the Venice Film Festival in 2006. Edgar Reitz can claim to have achieved a global reputation with his three Heimat film series, which have been screened widely outside Germany and which have achieved high viewing figures and a major fan base in many countries. However, in comparison with other major directors such as Wim Wenders and Rainer Werner Fassbinder working in German cinema since its re-emergence on the international stage in the mid-1960s, Reitz has been addressed only partially in critical scholarship, and only in any detail in shorter journal articles aimed at an elite academic audience. There is a pressing need for a monograph which will offer a comprehensive assessment of the overall Heimat trilogy in English (with the possibility of a subsequent German translation). My aim is to complete a 60000 word book manuscript for Wallflower Press in London to meet this need.\n\nThe overriding research question will be to assess the coherence and consistency of Reitz's three Heimat film series. As von Moltke (2002) has argued, the Heimatfilm works generically by registering and mythologizing the ongoing processes of modernisation undertaken in Germany in the last hundred years within the particular spaces of the local. The key research question will be to apply the conceptual framework of the 'nostalgic modernisation' performed by the Heimatfilm to an analysis of each of the three Heimat film series.\nIn analysing Heimat and Die zweite Heimat/Heimat 2, I want to assess particularly how in cinematic terms Reitz addresses and reflects on the 'role and transformation of provincial space in German history' (von Moltke, 2005). With reference to the first Heimat, I wish to analyse the problematic impact of various media and transport technologies in the space of the Heimat. I wish to consider, when looking at Die zweite Heimat/Heimat 2, the extent to which Reitz constructs the urban environment of Munich, and the world of avant-garde music, as potentially utopian counterpoints to the Hunsrück landscape represented visually as the threatened Heimat in his first series. \nMy principal research corpus will comprise the three Heimat film series now widely available on DVD and also the recent Epilogue, Heimat Fragmente which is scheduled for a 2007 release date on DVD. My research methodology will draw on film historical paradigms which set films within the cultural, economic, technological, political and social context of their production, distribution and exhibition. I will be utilising extensively mise-en-scène and cinematographic criticism and other variants of formal analysis. \nI will also be building on my previous research into the Heimatfilm and German cinema's 'spatial imaginary' to apply concepts drawn from cultural theorists and cultural geographers, such as Kracauer, Benjamin, Deleuze, Bruno and Shaviro, interested in the intersection between space and place, visual imagery, and perception.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/E003974/1
    Funder Contribution: 24,129 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    The question of how we are to understand such apparently meaningful and true sentences as 'Pegasus does not exist,' 'Raskolnikov is a fictional character,' and 'Sherlock Holmes was a detective,' perennially plagues philosophers. On the one hand we are uncomfortable accepting the existence of such entities as Pegasus and Zeus. But on the other hand the truth and meaningfulness of such sentences seems prime facie to require that the terms 'Pegasus' and 'Zeus' refer to something. \n\nOne solution to this problem, suggested by Kendall Walton, Gareth Evans, Fred Kroon, and others, is to regard assertions of the problematic sentences as being made within the scope of a game of make-believe in which we pretend that there are such things as Pegasus and Zeus. Thus, for example, on this account, when we deploy the existence predicate we engage in a special pretence in which we pretend that our domain of discourse contains not only the denizens of the real world but also fictional objects from various fictional worlds. We use our existence predicate to mark this distinction. \n\nI will primarily be concerned with three classes of sentences: (a) Object-Fictional sentences such as 'Sherlock Holmes was a detective' which attempt to characterize the world of a fiction from an internal perspective without explicitly indicating the fictional status of their subject matter, (b) Meta-Fictional sentences such as 'Raskolnikov is a fictional character' which attempt to characterize a fiction from an external perspective that reveals the fictional status of their subject matter, and (c) Existence sentences, such as 'Kaplan exists' and 'Pegasus does not exist.' \n\n \nI motivate a pretence-theoretic approach to all three classes of sentence by a number of means. \n(i) I argue that (a) we should adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Object-Fictional sentences just in case we adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Meta-Fictional sentences (b) we should adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Meta-Fictional sentences just in case we adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Existence sentences, and (c) we should adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Object-Fictional sentences.\n (ii) I criticize alternative accounts of these sentences including, in particular, Fictional Realist accounts that postulate the existence of fictional objects.\n (iii) I argue that we can motivate a pretence-theoretic account of Meta-Fictional sentences by considering the nature and function of Meta-Fictional discourse.\n(iv) I argue that we can motivate a pretence-theoretic account of Existential sentences by considering the nature and function of Existence discourse.\n(v) I employ the cognitive account of pretence recently developed by Shaun Nichols and Stephen Stich to show that the attitudes we express using Object-Fictional sentences, Meta-Fictional sentences, and Existence sentences, are better understood as cases of pretence than belief or acceptance. \n\nAlthough pretence-theoretic accounts of such sentences are in many ways attractive, the existing pretence-theoretic accounts have had only sketchy and suggestive things to say about what the relevant pretences are supposed to involve and how, precisely, they are supposed to convey information about the real world. By employing the cognitive framework developed by Stich and Nichols I offer a precise and detailed account of what it is that we do when we pretend that our domain of discourse contains Pegasus or Zeus. And by employing the semantic framework developed by John Perry I offer a precise and detailed account of how the utterances we make within this pretence may allow us to convey information about the real world.\n\nI conclude by defending the proposed account against some of the challenges to pretence theoretic accounts of various phenomena recently mounted by Richard, Stanley, and Szabo. \n\n

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F009895/1
    Funder Contribution: 165,901 GBP
    Partners: University of Birmingham

    Exiles, emigrés, refugees and expatriates uprooted from their lands must make do in new surroundings, and the creativity as well as the sadness that can be seen in what they do is one of the experiences that has still to find its chroniclers' (Said 2001). Albeit a centuries old phenomenon, exile has come to represent one of the defining features of culture in the contemporary period, resulting in numerous comparative and postcolonial studies that attempt to account for its nature and influence (Steiner, Arendt, Said etc). \n\nThe case of Spanish Republican Exile (SRE) is still under-represented within comparative and cross-cultural approaches, and it is for this reason that the Centre for the Study of Hispanic Exile at Birmingham has chosen to focus primarily on SRE in order to properly situate the phenomenon within global narratives of exile in the contemporary world. Informed by the conviction that the case of Spain - where the Civil War of 1936-39 acted as a watershed in its social and political development - will offer new modes of understanding the relationships created by exile locally, transnationally and globally, the Centre has set out to create a series of resources on SRE, beginning with a searchable web resource funded by the British Academy (awarded 2007), that will benefit the whole academic community world-wide - those with a specific interest in the Spanish case and those with an interest in exile more generally.\n\nDr Buffery's project on 'Staging Exile, Migration and Diaspora in Hispanic Theatre and Performance Cultures' falls within one of the main areas defined by the Centre's broad research aims, that is the representational strategies used to (re)construct exilic memory in relation to a particular locale, the Spain that led to the dispersal, expulsion and alienation of many thousands of refugees and political exiles and the shadow it has left on contemporary Spanish society. In particular, it aims to recover and preserve the full range of representation of the experience of exile in theatrical and performance texts and paratexts (histories, memoirs, reviews, criticism, photographs and audiovisual recordings), by contributing to the creation, updating and maintenance of the Centre's bibliographical database and stand-alone web resource on SRE, and by bringing together key researchers on Spanish Exile Theatre and Performance in a series of panels within the conference on 'Geographies of Exile' to be held at the University of Birmingham in 2008, with a view to publishing an edited volume on 'Stages of Exile' in 2009.\n\nAlongside this work of synthesis and dissemination of the state of contemporary research into SRE, the project will explore through a series of case studies the changing status of exile representation and production in Spanish theatre and performance cultures, as well as the effects of the continuing waves of exile, diaspora and migration on the current configuration of the Spanish stage, and the ways in which identity is performed in the spaces of Hispanic culture. The project will employ a research assistant to work on a series of discrete case studies identified in the run-up to the 2008 conference, which will be incorporated into the web resource on SRE Remains. Doctor Buffery will focus primarily on theatre and performance groups in the Catalan-speaking areas, excavating their relationship with the texts and figures associated with SRE but also addressing the ways in which current population flows have contributed to shape the space of contemporary Spanish theatre. In addition, she will organise a series of 4-6 seminars at the University of Birmingham in 2009-2010 to facilitate presentation, discussion and dissemination of work in progress on exile theatre and performance in the Department of Hispanic Studies at Birmingham, including Sánchez's recovery of the figure of José García Lora,garcia Vidal's work Galician exile theatre and marcer's on Josep Palau I Fabre's theatre.

  • Project . 2008 - 2008
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F002378/1
    Funder Contribution: 24,613 GBP
    Partners: BBK

    British writing in the 1980s garnered acclaim, but remains incongruously ill-served by scholars. This has been a significant disadvantage to those both researching and teaching in the contemporary period. Research in this field has normally focused on single authors. My book will provide the first full and dedicated account of the literary response to this decisive conjuncture. The book will be wide-ranging and inclusive, though not exhaustive. Instead it will articulate particular themes and arguments which I propose are the most distinctive and dynamic trajectories of the period.\n\nI argue that the transformative power of Thatcherism generated writing in its wake and in opposition, which often echoed the contradictions of the political moment itself. The 'watershed' of the title signifies the attempted break with post-war consensus. The book will insist on the formative role of social conditions and cultural contexts. It will trace literature's registration of emergent experiences, notably in relation to nation, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. But it will also analyze the period as a specific conjuncture for literary forms. This account will in turn be grounded in the history of the institutions of publishing and dissemination at the time, which formed literary groupings and shaped public perceptions of writing. After an introductory analysis of Thatcherism, the book will thus frame literary history through the history of publishing, arts organizations and media.\n\nChapter One, 'Winners', will discuss both those writers who formed the literary establishment at the start of the decade, and those who would become the next hegemonic generation. (The two Amises are emblematic here.) Subsequent writers found themselves in a contradictory relation to the new landscape of Thatcherism, which their work by turns relished and disdained. Chapter Two, 'Disaffections', argues that a full account of the literature of Thatcherism must also contemplate the large body of writing written in the name of the downtrodden and dispossessed, including the work of Pat Barker, Tony Harrison and James Kelman. Chapter Three, 'Modes', starts from formal and intellectual concerns, exploring the claims of literary experiment. The category of Postmodernism is limned as a discursive formation, with reference to the intersecting discourses of literary theory, literary and political journalism, and the novel itself. The influential metafictional mode of postmodernism will be set alongside alternatively experimental modes in poetry.\n\nChapter Four, 'Belongings', assesses the increasingly multiple and contested idea of British national identity. I show that writers of immigrant descent (Kureishi, Grace Nichols) made a significant impact on both poetry and fiction in Britain. Chapter Five, 'Passions', will explore tensions around both gender and sexuality at this conjuncture. The role of masculinity will be scrutinized, as will feminist writing, and the radical reinterpretations of tradition by Jeanette Winterson and Alan Hollinghurst. The Conclusion will assess the significance of the 1980s in modern literary history. It will also show that the legacy of the 1980s is still being worked through in contemporary literature, demonstrating that the field of the book remains an open, generative source.\n\nThe book is contracted with the University of Edinburgh Press for completion by September 2008, and publication in 2009. It will form part of the Edinburgh History of Twentieth-Century Literature in Britain. This will provide wide dissemination and publicity for the book. Work on the book is underway following the production of an 8,000-word proposal which has been approved and improved by a series of readers. The book draws on research I have been undertaking into this period for a number of years, much of it already published. However, the book will be an entirely new publication.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F012918/1
    Funder Contribution: 37,317 GBP
    Partners: University of Dundee

    REWIND is a research project funded by the AHRC in 2004, that provides a research resource that addresses the gap in historical knowledge of the evolution of electronic media arts in the UK, by investigating specifically the first two decades of artists' works in video. There was a danger that many of these works might have disappeared because of their ephemeral nature and poor technical condition. The project has sought to determine the best examples of works from the period, conserve and preserve them (in partnership with the Scottish Screen Archive), to enable further scholarly activity. An archive, exhibitions, salons and a Content Management System (CMS), have been employed to disseminate the works to the public and academic community, with further exhibitions being planned for 2008-2010.\n\nThe CMS offers online access to interviews with artists and animateurs, documentation, background material and associated ephemera. The interviews are in video/audio form and downloadable PDF files. \n\nThe REWIND ARCHIVE and COLLECTION currently has 250 works including single channel videoworks and 30 installations. \n\nResearch Leave is required to complete the main publication and plan and curate a series of exhibitions, screenings, and other events. \n\nAs the Research Grant was awarded before FEC an application for Research Leave is allowable and was indicated in the original application.\n

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F00379X/1
    Funder Contribution: 29,205 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    In this book I wanted to describe and contribute to the discussion of five 'quaestiones disputatae' (disputed questions) in the field of 'theology of religions'. Theology of religions is currently defined in terms of how: Christian theology relates to and assesses other religions; whether non-Christians are 'saved'; and whether other religions can be a means of salvation despite the claim that salvation is through Jesus Christ alone; and by attention to a number of other questions. \n\nIn the first chapter I want to argue that world 'religions' have been problematically seen in a unitary fashion as if they were clear analogues to 'Christianity'. This cultural production of religion started in the seventeenth century and has skewed the radical difference and otherness of non-Christian beliefs and practices. I argue for a more theological definition of 'religion' that relies neither on seeing the 'other' as if they were a mirror image of 'Christianity' (distorted or otherwise); or on assessing the other in Christian terms. This allows for a new form of contextualised and specific engagement with the cultural and political phenomenon of a religion in a particular time and place which forgoes any overall general theology of religions. \n\nIn the second chapter I isolate key social and political, rather than theological, factors that have shaped the theological debate in Europe and the United States since the nineteenth century. I examine the influences of colonialism, the Holocaust, anti-Semitism, secularism and capitalism to show how these factors have actually dictated various theological positions. I argue that this situation in which non-theological considerations dictate theological positions requires remedy, without in any way insulating theology from history and other disciplines.\n\nIn the third chapter I examine the vexed question as to whether non-Christians are saved or not. I want to show how this debate has been reliant on a particular model of mapping out positions in the theology of religions utilised since the mid nineteenth century which has unduly shaped the question into an either/or choice. I criticise this model and argue that this issue is not a question that can or should be answered for theological reasons and that this question should be removed from the disputed questions in this field. \n\nIn the fourth chapter, I turn to the question of whether in principle a non-Christian religions can be the means of salvation. This particular question has received much attention in the reaction to Jacques Dupuis book, so I outline the arguments on both sides of the Dupuis debate. I want to suggest that a resolution to this central debate can be reached through utilising the technical distinction between a sacrament and a quasi-sacrament (in effect the former being an objective effacious saving act, regardless of the respondent's disposition or the giver's disposition; and the latter being dependent on both the giver and the respondent for its effacious nature). I shall argue that other religion can be quasi-sacramental in principle, although the question of whether they are in practice is entirely another matter. They cannot be sacramental in principle or practice. \n\nIn the final chapter I turn to the recent debate about the social and political 'clash of civilizations' (Samuel Huntington) and the importance of democracy to negotiate religious differences (Jeffrey Stout). I shall be arguing that both thinker's over-value democracy and its historical role in religious civilisations and show how careful and reasoned argument between and within traditions can be pursued without the social necessity of democracy. I am not concerned to advance an anti-democratic position as such, but to question whether democracy is a 'sacred cow'. This chapter is also an attempt to show how theological reasoning is central to determining social and political considerations.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/G006644/1
    Funder Contribution: 25,149 GBP
    Partners: University of Salford

    Guitar poetry arose in the Soviet Union in the late 1950s, a period marked by the destalinisation of Soviet society. In official circles, denunciation of Stalin created a need to reaffirm fundamental tenets of Soviet faith (such as collectivism, party-mindedness and love of the motherland), with a particular focus on the upbringing of Soviet youth. Initially a spontaneous and youth-driven pastime, guitar poetry was received with cautious favour by Soviet authorities, who saw it as a genuine expression of the concerns of Soviet youth (if in a raw form requiring professional guidance) and as a potential instrument of cultural-ideological influence. By the early 1960s, however, this favour soured, as individual bards achieved popular stardom and, thanks to dissemination via magnitizdat (home-made tape recordings), songs circulated rapidly and relatively free of censorship. By the late 1960s, a full-scale assault on guitar poetry was underway: individual bards were viciously attacked in the press, and concerts and festivals were banned. By the 1970s the genre was simultaneously suppressed (through persecution of individual bards, on one hand, and critical silence about the genre as a whole, on the other) and co-opted (bards' songs were used in films, on television and in theatrical spectacles, for example). It has long been noted (see Smith 1984) that the majority of bards and the vast majority of songs were apolitical, and also that many bards participated openly in creative life throughout the 1970s and beyond. At the same time, however, a strongly politicised view of guitar poetry persists; and it is reflected in the understanding of increased official hostility as a direct result of songs' lyrics (these being widely accepted as the privileged site of meaning in guitar poetry). This seemingly paradoxical situation--the politically innocuous nature of most songs' lyrics combined with the politically charged response guitar poetry provoked (and continues to provoke)--deserves close scrutiny.\n\nThe present project seeks to address this important but hitherto neglected issue, analysing guitar poetry not simply as a means of entertainment or an incarnation of martyred Russian letters, but as a powerful medium of communication, self-fashioning and community-building. The theoretical framework for this project is grounded in marginality theory, which focuses on the peculiarities of 'borderline' social and cultural phenomena. This approach offers a way of viewing guitar poetry's hybridity (its synthesis of literary and musical aspects) and its marginality (its ability to survive and thrive in spatial, cultural and technological 'grey areas') as sites of creative potential and of 'radical possibility' (Hooks); and also as implicit challenges to the Soviet ideological system. The analysis will encompass guitar poetry as a whole, taking in minor and major bards and examining songs in performance as well as in text. Though deemphasised, the role of text will not be ignored, and will be considered alongside issues of context, dissemination, performance and reception that will be foregrounded as key elements in the processes of communication and self-fashioning. By underscoring rather than effacing guitar poetry's complexities and contradictions, this interdisciplinary approach will shed new light on guitar poetry's function in Soviet society of the post-Stalin period, on its vital role in the rehabilitation of the individual and in the shaping of individual personalities after the fall of the 'cult of personality'. By focusing on a genre that is as yet understudied in the West, this project will make an important contribution to the study of non-canonical Russian culture. By drawing on marginality theory, the project will help to bridge the gap between an important body of Western critical theory and Russian cultural studies; and it will also represent an important contribution to the theoretical study of popular culture more broadly.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/G013500/1
    Funder Contribution: 47,424 GBP
    Partners: University of Cambridge, Université Paris Diderot, W&M, University of Warwick

    This proposal will create a European network of early American history. It is designed to foster international collaboration between early Americanists throughout Europe. As such, it provides a multilateral European alternative for the practice of early American history - an increasingly international field - different from normal bilateral relationships between individual Europeanists and scholars and institutions in North America. It will provide a means whereby European early Americanists can share their work with other Europeanists without the expense and difficulty of presenting such work in America. Such a network will be of potentially great value to postgraduate students and to European scholars with limited resources who find it difficult to accommodate themselves to American intellectual patterns. It build on the successful establishment of an early American network within Britain (the British Group in Early American History), which has held annual conferences on North American history for over a decade. It also builds on the networks established in early American history (marked by the formation of a Scientific Committee on early American history) at the first European network on early American history held in Paris, December 2006. The principal aim of the European Network in Early American History is to establish fora where European scholars will meet to exchange ideas and do research. This is especially important at a time when European and American agendas in contemporary politics and in institutional assumptions are more divergent than for many years. The network will host biannual conferences at European venues (Venice 2008, Paris 2010, Spain/Portgual 2012, Germany 2014) where European scholars will present work to other European early Americanists and to scholars from North America. It will, through its Scientific Committee, serve as a clearing house for collaborative bids to European funding bodies and will serve as an institutional link with important stakeholders in Europe and in America (such as BGEAH and the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture). It will, under the auspices of the Virtual Research Group in Early Modern History at the University of Warwick, host bi monthly virtual meetings on early American history with European colleagues. It will provide opportunities for postgraduate students, both at biannual conferences and through research meetings in individual European countries, with opportunities to present their work to a diverse European group of scholars. Most importantly, the network will connect European scholars with developing early American scholarship that stresses the cosmopolitan origins of early American history. In this evolving scholarship, European early Americanists can play a vital part. They are well-placed to show, through researches in European archives and through increasing participation in a European as opposed to an American network of scholars, how a European perspective on early American history can complicate and enrich an early American scholarship that is increasingly focused on Atlantic rather than purely American links. By 2010 we aim to have a flourishing and self-sustaining network of European scholars interested in early American history that interacts with each other on a regular basis at networked events in varying locales throughout Europe. One feature of this network will be the wide variety of European countries that will be represented in the network. Key partners in the network are the University of Warwick, the University of Paris, the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture and the University of Cambridge, but it will extend beyond the well-established early American historical networks in Britain and France to include substantial representation from southern and eastern Europe. The activities of the network will be disseminated through a dedicated website for early American history in Europe.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F010559/1
    Funder Contribution: 801,078 GBP
    Partners: University of St Andrews

    Intuitions and Philosophical Methodology will study and evaluate the methods contemporary philosophers as a matter fact employ. It is a project about how philosophy is and should be done. Our primary focus is on the ways in which philosophers appeal to 'intuitions' and use thought-experiments. A standard procedure in philosophy is the following: Some philosophical concept, C, is under discussion. We are presented with a thought experiment in which a scenario, S, is imagined, and we are asked to have intuitions about whether C is instantiated in S. This kind of procedure is at the centre of the some of the most important arguments in philosophy of language, mind, logic, metaphysics, and ethics. For example, in Gettier's famous argument against the so-called 'justified true belief theory of knowledge' we are asked us to imagine someone who has justified true belief that p, but, intuitively, doesn't know that p. That we have this intuition is taken to be very strong evidence that the justified-true-belief theory is false. Any systematic investigation of the methodological issues raised by such examples must give centre stage to two basic questions: \n1. What is a philosophical intuition? \n2. What role(s) do and should intuition play in philosophical methodology? \nSatisfactory answers to these questions are crucial to our understanding of what philosophy is, should be, and can be. It is not unthinkable that a rejection of this methodology might even jeopardise the entire enterprise of analytic philosophy as currently practiced.\n The project is organized into four phases. In Phase One we examine in depth a range of central examples of the method from a variety of areas of philosophy, including epistemology, philosophy of language and mind, logic, and metaphysics. In Phase Two we develop and evaluate models of intuition that systematise the details reviewed in Phase One. Phase Three is concerned with three sceptical challenges to the use of intuitions in philosophy. We ask, first, why philosophers think that a mere intuition that p provides any kind of reliable indication of the truth of p? Second, given that so much philosophical argument results in an intractable conflict of intuitions, how can philosophical intuition be any kind of source of philosophical knowledge? Finally, given that intuitions seem particularly prone to be influenced by contingent cultural and historical factors, why take intuitions to be more than a reflection of our historically local prejudices?\n The final phase of the project turns to a detailed case study. We apply lessons learned and frameworks developed in earlier phases to study a major issue at the intersection of philosophy of language and epistemology. Many epistemologist are proposing to adopt what has been called the 'New Linguistic Turn' (NLT) according to which the semantics for epistemically central concepts like 'knowledge', 'justification' and 'rationality' are based on appeals to intuitions about what speakers would say in various epistemic settings. Our goal will be to evaluate this proposal in the light of what has been learned about philosophical methodology in the first three phases. \n\n\n

  • Project . 2008 - 2009
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/G009635/1
    Funder Contribution: 16,483 GBP
    Partners: LSBU, Stour Valley Arts

    Superkingdom is the third part of 'Hibernator', a trilogy of works connecting myth and science, environmental cues and technological control, the virtual worlds we imagine and the real world we cannot escape. \n\nThe Superkingdom proposal draws on the natural woodland environment of King's Wood, Kent to inspire a series of animal 'Show Homes' that will provide a platform to observe and study animal behaviour over the winter months.\n\nConsidered as an enclave, a protected area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, King's Wood is an environment surrounded by encroaching urban development. This contention will provide the context for research into the changing habitat and consequent animal displacement and migration within the region of King's Wood. The fellow will develop a narrative of urban-rural / animal-human intersection. \n\nThe fellow will research the architecture of animals in particular their achievements in structural form and strength, use of locally resourced materials, ventilation and pest management. These methods will be contrasted to the architecture created by humankind.\n\nThis research will inform the design of a series of 'Show Homes' to encourage animals to take up residence. The 'Show Homes' will reflect human authoritarian architecture, fantastical architecture and the architecture created by animals. The structures will correspond with different sites of habitation - the canopy, floor and underground spaces of the forest. \n\nDrawing on existing research into the patterns of animals that hibernate, migrate or forage all winter, the forest installation will become a site for the study of animal habitation and behaviour. This study will provide content for a digital moving image work that will reflect the winter ecology of the forest. In contrast there will be a fictional element to the film to suggest changing environmental cues through an influx of non-native species taking up residence.\n\nThe 'Show Homes' will be filmed in situ with footage of both their external and internal spaces. The film will combine fictional utopias, dystopias, and dream worlds with architectural follies and notions of the 'new town'. \n\nTo further express ideas of displacement and non-locality, the fellow will collaborate with New Zealand based composer Dugal McKinnon who will develop a sound track for the moving image work, using sound recordings from forests in New Zealand, juxtaposing sound and image both geographically and seasonally.\n\n\n\n

Advanced search in
Projects
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
472 Projects, page 1 of 48
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F006101/1
    Funder Contribution: 25,953 GBP
    Partners: QMUL

    The aim of this application for funding is to support the completion of a short critical monograph assessing the Heimat film trilogy by Edgar Reitz. This would be the first book-length study in either English or German to offer a comprehensive assessment and critical analysis of Reitz's major work. The Heimat trilogy comprises a linked project of three film series which chronicles extensively everyday life in a fictional west German village and, in Die zweite Heimat/Heimat 2 (1992), also student life in the city of Munich, between 1919 and 2000. Reitz began shooting in the late 1970s for the first Heimat (1984) and completed his project with Heimat 3 in 2004, which itself was augmented recently with an Epilogue (Heimat Fragmente) shown at the Venice Film Festival in 2006. Edgar Reitz can claim to have achieved a global reputation with his three Heimat film series, which have been screened widely outside Germany and which have achieved high viewing figures and a major fan base in many countries. However, in comparison with other major directors such as Wim Wenders and Rainer Werner Fassbinder working in German cinema since its re-emergence on the international stage in the mid-1960s, Reitz has been addressed only partially in critical scholarship, and only in any detail in shorter journal articles aimed at an elite academic audience. There is a pressing need for a monograph which will offer a comprehensive assessment of the overall Heimat trilogy in English (with the possibility of a subsequent German translation). My aim is to complete a 60000 word book manuscript for Wallflower Press in London to meet this need.\n\nThe overriding research question will be to assess the coherence and consistency of Reitz's three Heimat film series. As von Moltke (2002) has argued, the Heimatfilm works generically by registering and mythologizing the ongoing processes of modernisation undertaken in Germany in the last hundred years within the particular spaces of the local. The key research question will be to apply the conceptual framework of the 'nostalgic modernisation' performed by the Heimatfilm to an analysis of each of the three Heimat film series.\nIn analysing Heimat and Die zweite Heimat/Heimat 2, I want to assess particularly how in cinematic terms Reitz addresses and reflects on the 'role and transformation of provincial space in German history' (von Moltke, 2005). With reference to the first Heimat, I wish to analyse the problematic impact of various media and transport technologies in the space of the Heimat. I wish to consider, when looking at Die zweite Heimat/Heimat 2, the extent to which Reitz constructs the urban environment of Munich, and the world of avant-garde music, as potentially utopian counterpoints to the Hunsrück landscape represented visually as the threatened Heimat in his first series. \nMy principal research corpus will comprise the three Heimat film series now widely available on DVD and also the recent Epilogue, Heimat Fragmente which is scheduled for a 2007 release date on DVD. My research methodology will draw on film historical paradigms which set films within the cultural, economic, technological, political and social context of their production, distribution and exhibition. I will be utilising extensively mise-en-scène and cinematographic criticism and other variants of formal analysis. \nI will also be building on my previous research into the Heimatfilm and German cinema's 'spatial imaginary' to apply concepts drawn from cultural theorists and cultural geographers, such as Kracauer, Benjamin, Deleuze, Bruno and Shaviro, interested in the intersection between space and place, visual imagery, and perception.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/E003974/1
    Funder Contribution: 24,129 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    The question of how we are to understand such apparently meaningful and true sentences as 'Pegasus does not exist,' 'Raskolnikov is a fictional character,' and 'Sherlock Holmes was a detective,' perennially plagues philosophers. On the one hand we are uncomfortable accepting the existence of such entities as Pegasus and Zeus. But on the other hand the truth and meaningfulness of such sentences seems prime facie to require that the terms 'Pegasus' and 'Zeus' refer to something. \n\nOne solution to this problem, suggested by Kendall Walton, Gareth Evans, Fred Kroon, and others, is to regard assertions of the problematic sentences as being made within the scope of a game of make-believe in which we pretend that there are such things as Pegasus and Zeus. Thus, for example, on this account, when we deploy the existence predicate we engage in a special pretence in which we pretend that our domain of discourse contains not only the denizens of the real world but also fictional objects from various fictional worlds. We use our existence predicate to mark this distinction. \n\nI will primarily be concerned with three classes of sentences: (a) Object-Fictional sentences such as 'Sherlock Holmes was a detective' which attempt to characterize the world of a fiction from an internal perspective without explicitly indicating the fictional status of their subject matter, (b) Meta-Fictional sentences such as 'Raskolnikov is a fictional character' which attempt to characterize a fiction from an external perspective that reveals the fictional status of their subject matter, and (c) Existence sentences, such as 'Kaplan exists' and 'Pegasus does not exist.' \n\n \nI motivate a pretence-theoretic approach to all three classes of sentence by a number of means. \n(i) I argue that (a) we should adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Object-Fictional sentences just in case we adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Meta-Fictional sentences (b) we should adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Meta-Fictional sentences just in case we adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Existence sentences, and (c) we should adopt a pretence-theoretic account of Object-Fictional sentences.\n (ii) I criticize alternative accounts of these sentences including, in particular, Fictional Realist accounts that postulate the existence of fictional objects.\n (iii) I argue that we can motivate a pretence-theoretic account of Meta-Fictional sentences by considering the nature and function of Meta-Fictional discourse.\n(iv) I argue that we can motivate a pretence-theoretic account of Existential sentences by considering the nature and function of Existence discourse.\n(v) I employ the cognitive account of pretence recently developed by Shaun Nichols and Stephen Stich to show that the attitudes we express using Object-Fictional sentences, Meta-Fictional sentences, and Existence sentences, are better understood as cases of pretence than belief or acceptance. \n\nAlthough pretence-theoretic accounts of such sentences are in many ways attractive, the existing pretence-theoretic accounts have had only sketchy and suggestive things to say about what the relevant pretences are supposed to involve and how, precisely, they are supposed to convey information about the real world. By employing the cognitive framework developed by Stich and Nichols I offer a precise and detailed account of what it is that we do when we pretend that our domain of discourse contains Pegasus or Zeus. And by employing the semantic framework developed by John Perry I offer a precise and detailed account of how the utterances we make within this pretence may allow us to convey information about the real world.\n\nI conclude by defending the proposed account against some of the challenges to pretence theoretic accounts of various phenomena recently mounted by Richard, Stanley, and Szabo. \n\n

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F009895/1
    Funder Contribution: 165,901 GBP
    Partners: University of Birmingham

    Exiles, emigrés, refugees and expatriates uprooted from their lands must make do in new surroundings, and the creativity as well as the sadness that can be seen in what they do is one of the experiences that has still to find its chroniclers' (Said 2001). Albeit a centuries old phenomenon, exile has come to represent one of the defining features of culture in the contemporary period, resulting in numerous comparative and postcolonial studies that attempt to account for its nature and influence (Steiner, Arendt, Said etc). \n\nThe case of Spanish Republican Exile (SRE) is still under-represented within comparative and cross-cultural approaches, and it is for this reason that the Centre for the Study of Hispanic Exile at Birmingham has chosen to focus primarily on SRE in order to properly situate the phenomenon within global narratives of exile in the contemporary world. Informed by the conviction that the case of Spain - where the Civil War of 1936-39 acted as a watershed in its social and political development - will offer new modes of understanding the relationships created by exile locally, transnationally and globally, the Centre has set out to create a series of resources on SRE, beginning with a searchable web resource funded by the British Academy (awarded 2007), that will benefit the whole academic community world-wide - those with a specific interest in the Spanish case and those with an interest in exile more generally.\n\nDr Buffery's project on 'Staging Exile, Migration and Diaspora in Hispanic Theatre and Performance Cultures' falls within one of the main areas defined by the Centre's broad research aims, that is the representational strategies used to (re)construct exilic memory in relation to a particular locale, the Spain that led to the dispersal, expulsion and alienation of many thousands of refugees and political exiles and the shadow it has left on contemporary Spanish society. In particular, it aims to recover and preserve the full range of representation of the experience of exile in theatrical and performance texts and paratexts (histories, memoirs, reviews, criticism, photographs and audiovisual recordings), by contributing to the creation, updating and maintenance of the Centre's bibliographical database and stand-alone web resource on SRE, and by bringing together key researchers on Spanish Exile Theatre and Performance in a series of panels within the conference on 'Geographies of Exile' to be held at the University of Birmingham in 2008, with a view to publishing an edited volume on 'Stages of Exile' in 2009.\n\nAlongside this work of synthesis and dissemination of the state of contemporary research into SRE, the project will explore through a series of case studies the changing status of exile representation and production in Spanish theatre and performance cultures, as well as the effects of the continuing waves of exile, diaspora and migration on the current configuration of the Spanish stage, and the ways in which identity is performed in the spaces of Hispanic culture. The project will employ a research assistant to work on a series of discrete case studies identified in the run-up to the 2008 conference, which will be incorporated into the web resource on SRE Remains. Doctor Buffery will focus primarily on theatre and performance groups in the Catalan-speaking areas, excavating their relationship with the texts and figures associated with SRE but also addressing the ways in which current population flows have contributed to shape the space of contemporary Spanish theatre. In addition, she will organise a series of 4-6 seminars at the University of Birmingham in 2009-2010 to facilitate presentation, discussion and dissemination of work in progress on exile theatre and performance in the Department of Hispanic Studies at Birmingham, including Sánchez's recovery of the figure of José García Lora,garcia Vidal's work Galician exile theatre and marcer's on Josep Palau I Fabre's theatre.

  • Project . 2008 - 2008
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F002378/1
    Funder Contribution: 24,613 GBP
    Partners: BBK

    British writing in the 1980s garnered acclaim, but remains incongruously ill-served by scholars. This has been a significant disadvantage to those both researching and teaching in the contemporary period. Research in this field has normally focused on single authors. My book will provide the first full and dedicated account of the literary response to this decisive conjuncture. The book will be wide-ranging and inclusive, though not exhaustive. Instead it will articulate particular themes and arguments which I propose are the most distinctive and dynamic trajectories of the period.\n\nI argue that the transformative power of Thatcherism generated writing in its wake and in opposition, which often echoed the contradictions of the political moment itself. The 'watershed' of the title signifies the attempted break with post-war consensus. The book will insist on the formative role of social conditions and cultural contexts. It will trace literature's registration of emergent experiences, notably in relation to nation, ethnicity, gender and sexuality. But it will also analyze the period as a specific conjuncture for literary forms. This account will in turn be grounded in the history of the institutions of publishing and dissemination at the time, which formed literary groupings and shaped public perceptions of writing. After an introductory analysis of Thatcherism, the book will thus frame literary history through the history of publishing, arts organizations and media.\n\nChapter One, 'Winners', will discuss both those writers who formed the literary establishment at the start of the decade, and those who would become the next hegemonic generation. (The two Amises are emblematic here.) Subsequent writers found themselves in a contradictory relation to the new landscape of Thatcherism, which their work by turns relished and disdained. Chapter Two, 'Disaffections', argues that a full account of the literature of Thatcherism must also contemplate the large body of writing written in the name of the downtrodden and dispossessed, including the work of Pat Barker, Tony Harrison and James Kelman. Chapter Three, 'Modes', starts from formal and intellectual concerns, exploring the claims of literary experiment. The category of Postmodernism is limned as a discursive formation, with reference to the intersecting discourses of literary theory, literary and political journalism, and the novel itself. The influential metafictional mode of postmodernism will be set alongside alternatively experimental modes in poetry.\n\nChapter Four, 'Belongings', assesses the increasingly multiple and contested idea of British national identity. I show that writers of immigrant descent (Kureishi, Grace Nichols) made a significant impact on both poetry and fiction in Britain. Chapter Five, 'Passions', will explore tensions around both gender and sexuality at this conjuncture. The role of masculinity will be scrutinized, as will feminist writing, and the radical reinterpretations of tradition by Jeanette Winterson and Alan Hollinghurst. The Conclusion will assess the significance of the 1980s in modern literary history. It will also show that the legacy of the 1980s is still being worked through in contemporary literature, demonstrating that the field of the book remains an open, generative source.\n\nThe book is contracted with the University of Edinburgh Press for completion by September 2008, and publication in 2009. It will form part of the Edinburgh History of Twentieth-Century Literature in Britain. This will provide wide dissemination and publicity for the book. Work on the book is underway following the production of an 8,000-word proposal which has been approved and improved by a series of readers. The book draws on research I have been undertaking into this period for a number of years, much of it already published. However, the book will be an entirely new publication.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F012918/1
    Funder Contribution: 37,317 GBP
    Partners: University of Dundee

    REWIND is a research project funded by the AHRC in 2004, that provides a research resource that addresses the gap in historical knowledge of the evolution of electronic media arts in the UK, by investigating specifically the first two decades of artists' works in video. There was a danger that many of these works might have disappeared because of their ephemeral nature and poor technical condition. The project has sought to determine the best examples of works from the period, conserve and preserve them (in partnership with the Scottish Screen Archive), to enable further scholarly activity. An archive, exhibitions, salons and a Content Management System (CMS), have been employed to disseminate the works to the public and academic community, with further exhibitions being planned for 2008-2010.\n\nThe CMS offers online access to interviews with artists and animateurs, documentation, background material and associated ephemera. The interviews are in video/audio form and downloadable PDF files. \n\nThe REWIND ARCHIVE and COLLECTION currently has 250 works including single channel videoworks and 30 installations. \n\nResearch Leave is required to complete the main publication and plan and curate a series of exhibitions, screenings, and other events. \n\nAs the Research Grant was awarded before FEC an application for Research Leave is allowable and was indicated in the original application.\n

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F00379X/1
    Funder Contribution: 29,205 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    In this book I wanted to describe and contribute to the discussion of five 'quaestiones disputatae' (disputed questions) in the field of 'theology of religions'. Theology of religions is currently defined in terms of how: Christian theology relates to and assesses other religions; whether non-Christians are 'saved'; and whether other religions can be a means of salvation despite the claim that salvation is through Jesus Christ alone; and by attention to a number of other questions. \n\nIn the first chapter I want to argue that world 'religions' have been problematically seen in a unitary fashion as if they were clear analogues to 'Christianity'. This cultural production of religion started in the seventeenth century and has skewed the radical difference and otherness of non-Christian beliefs and practices. I argue for a more theological definition of 'religion' that relies neither on seeing the 'other' as if they were a mirror image of 'Christianity' (distorted or otherwise); or on assessing the other in Christian terms. This allows for a new form of contextualised and specific engagement with the cultural and political phenomenon of a religion in a particular time and place which forgoes any overall general theology of religions. \n\nIn the second chapter I isolate key social and political, rather than theological, factors that have shaped the theological debate in Europe and the United States since the nineteenth century. I examine the influences of colonialism, the Holocaust, anti-Semitism, secularism and capitalism to show how these factors have actually dictated various theological positions. I argue that this situation in which non-theological considerations dictate theological positions requires remedy, without in any way insulating theology from history and other disciplines.\n\nIn the third chapter I examine the vexed question as to whether non-Christians are saved or not. I want to show how this debate has been reliant on a particular model of mapping out positions in the theology of religions utilised since the mid nineteenth century which has unduly shaped the question into an either/or choice. I criticise this model and argue that this issue is not a question that can or should be answered for theological reasons and that this question should be removed from the disputed questions in this field. \n\nIn the fourth chapter, I turn to the question of whether in principle a non-Christian religions can be the means of salvation. This particular question has received much attention in the reaction to Jacques Dupuis book, so I outline the arguments on both sides of the Dupuis debate. I want to suggest that a resolution to this central debate can be reached through utilising the technical distinction between a sacrament and a quasi-sacrament (in effect the former being an objective effacious saving act, regardless of the respondent's disposition or the giver's disposition; and the latter being dependent on both the giver and the respondent for its effacious nature). I shall argue that other religion can be quasi-sacramental in principle, although the question of whether they are in practice is entirely another matter. They cannot be sacramental in principle or practice. \n\nIn the final chapter I turn to the recent debate about the social and political 'clash of civilizations' (Samuel Huntington) and the importance of democracy to negotiate religious differences (Jeffrey Stout). I shall be arguing that both thinker's over-value democracy and its historical role in religious civilisations and show how careful and reasoned argument between and within traditions can be pursued without the social necessity of democracy. I am not concerned to advance an anti-democratic position as such, but to question whether democracy is a 'sacred cow'. This chapter is also an attempt to show how theological reasoning is central to determining social and political considerations.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/G006644/1
    Funder Contribution: 25,149 GBP
    Partners: University of Salford

    Guitar poetry arose in the Soviet Union in the late 1950s, a period marked by the destalinisation of Soviet society. In official circles, denunciation of Stalin created a need to reaffirm fundamental tenets of Soviet faith (such as collectivism, party-mindedness and love of the motherland), with a particular focus on the upbringing of Soviet youth. Initially a spontaneous and youth-driven pastime, guitar poetry was received with cautious favour by Soviet authorities, who saw it as a genuine expression of the concerns of Soviet youth (if in a raw form requiring professional guidance) and as a potential instrument of cultural-ideological influence. By the early 1960s, however, this favour soured, as individual bards achieved popular stardom and, thanks to dissemination via magnitizdat (home-made tape recordings), songs circulated rapidly and relatively free of censorship. By the late 1960s, a full-scale assault on guitar poetry was underway: individual bards were viciously attacked in the press, and concerts and festivals were banned. By the 1970s the genre was simultaneously suppressed (through persecution of individual bards, on one hand, and critical silence about the genre as a whole, on the other) and co-opted (bards' songs were used in films, on television and in theatrical spectacles, for example). It has long been noted (see Smith 1984) that the majority of bards and the vast majority of songs were apolitical, and also that many bards participated openly in creative life throughout the 1970s and beyond. At the same time, however, a strongly politicised view of guitar poetry persists; and it is reflected in the understanding of increased official hostility as a direct result of songs' lyrics (these being widely accepted as the privileged site of meaning in guitar poetry). This seemingly paradoxical situation--the politically innocuous nature of most songs' lyrics combined with the politically charged response guitar poetry provoked (and continues to provoke)--deserves close scrutiny.\n\nThe present project seeks to address this important but hitherto neglected issue, analysing guitar poetry not simply as a means of entertainment or an incarnation of martyred Russian letters, but as a powerful medium of communication, self-fashioning and community-building. The theoretical framework for this project is grounded in marginality theory, which focuses on the peculiarities of 'borderline' social and cultural phenomena. This approach offers a way of viewing guitar poetry's hybridity (its synthesis of literary and musical aspects) and its marginality (its ability to survive and thrive in spatial, cultural and technological 'grey areas') as sites of creative potential and of 'radical possibility' (Hooks); and also as implicit challenges to the Soviet ideological system. The analysis will encompass guitar poetry as a whole, taking in minor and major bards and examining songs in performance as well as in text. Though deemphasised, the role of text will not be ignored, and will be considered alongside issues of context, dissemination, performance and reception that will be foregrounded as key elements in the processes of communication and self-fashioning. By underscoring rather than effacing guitar poetry's complexities and contradictions, this interdisciplinary approach will shed new light on guitar poetry's function in Soviet society of the post-Stalin period, on its vital role in the rehabilitation of the individual and in the shaping of individual personalities after the fall of the 'cult of personality'. By focusing on a genre that is as yet understudied in the West, this project will make an important contribution to the study of non-canonical Russian culture. By drawing on marginality theory, the project will help to bridge the gap between an important body of Western critical theory and Russian cultural studies; and it will also represent an important contribution to the theoretical study of popular culture more broadly.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/G013500/1
    Funder Contribution: 47,424 GBP
    Partners: University of Cambridge, Université Paris Diderot, W&M, University of Warwick

    This proposal will create a European network of early American history. It is designed to foster international collaboration between early Americanists throughout Europe. As such, it provides a multilateral European alternative for the practice of early American history - an increasingly international field - different from normal bilateral relationships between individual Europeanists and scholars and institutions in North America. It will provide a means whereby European early Americanists can share their work with other Europeanists without the expense and difficulty of presenting such work in America. Such a network will be of potentially great value to postgraduate students and to European scholars with limited resources who find it difficult to accommodate themselves to American intellectual patterns. It build on the successful establishment of an early American network within Britain (the British Group in Early American History), which has held annual conferences on North American history for over a decade. It also builds on the networks established in early American history (marked by the formation of a Scientific Committee on early American history) at the first European network on early American history held in Paris, December 2006. The principal aim of the European Network in Early American History is to establish fora where European scholars will meet to exchange ideas and do research. This is especially important at a time when European and American agendas in contemporary politics and in institutional assumptions are more divergent than for many years. The network will host biannual conferences at European venues (Venice 2008, Paris 2010, Spain/Portgual 2012, Germany 2014) where European scholars will present work to other European early Americanists and to scholars from North America. It will, through its Scientific Committee, serve as a clearing house for collaborative bids to European funding bodies and will serve as an institutional link with important stakeholders in Europe and in America (such as BGEAH and the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture). It will, under the auspices of the Virtual Research Group in Early Modern History at the University of Warwick, host bi monthly virtual meetings on early American history with European colleagues. It will provide opportunities for postgraduate students, both at biannual conferences and through research meetings in individual European countries, with opportunities to present their work to a diverse European group of scholars. Most importantly, the network will connect European scholars with developing early American scholarship that stresses the cosmopolitan origins of early American history. In this evolving scholarship, European early Americanists can play a vital part. They are well-placed to show, through researches in European archives and through increasing participation in a European as opposed to an American network of scholars, how a European perspective on early American history can complicate and enrich an early American scholarship that is increasingly focused on Atlantic rather than purely American links. By 2010 we aim to have a flourishing and self-sustaining network of European scholars interested in early American history that interacts with each other on a regular basis at networked events in varying locales throughout Europe. One feature of this network will be the wide variety of European countries that will be represented in the network. Key partners in the network are the University of Warwick, the University of Paris, the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture and the University of Cambridge, but it will extend beyond the well-established early American historical networks in Britain and France to include substantial representation from southern and eastern Europe. The activities of the network will be disseminated through a dedicated website for early American history in Europe.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/F010559/1
    Funder Contribution: 801,078 GBP
    Partners: University of St Andrews

    Intuitions and Philosophical Methodology will study and evaluate the methods contemporary philosophers as a matter fact employ. It is a project about how philosophy is and should be done. Our primary focus is on the ways in which philosophers appeal to 'intuitions' and use thought-experiments. A standard procedure in philosophy is the following: Some philosophical concept, C, is under discussion. We are presented with a thought experiment in which a scenario, S, is imagined, and we are asked to have intuitions about whether C is instantiated in S. This kind of procedure is at the centre of the some of the most important arguments in philosophy of language, mind, logic, metaphysics, and ethics. For example, in Gettier's famous argument against the so-called 'justified true belief theory of knowledge' we are asked us to imagine someone who has justified true belief that p, but, intuitively, doesn't know that p. That we have this intuition is taken to be very strong evidence that the justified-true-belief theory is false. Any systematic investigation of the methodological issues raised by such examples must give centre stage to two basic questions: \n1. What is a philosophical intuition? \n2. What role(s) do and should intuition play in philosophical methodology? \nSatisfactory answers to these questions are crucial to our understanding of what philosophy is, should be, and can be. It is not unthinkable that a rejection of this methodology might even jeopardise the entire enterprise of analytic philosophy as currently practiced.\n The project is organized into four phases. In Phase One we examine in depth a range of central examples of the method from a variety of areas of philosophy, including epistemology, philosophy of language and mind, logic, and metaphysics. In Phase Two we develop and evaluate models of intuition that systematise the details reviewed in Phase One. Phase Three is concerned with three sceptical challenges to the use of intuitions in philosophy. We ask, first, why philosophers think that a mere intuition that p provides any kind of reliable indication of the truth of p? Second, given that so much philosophical argument results in an intractable conflict of intuitions, how can philosophical intuition be any kind of source of philosophical knowledge? Finally, given that intuitions seem particularly prone to be influenced by contingent cultural and historical factors, why take intuitions to be more than a reflection of our historically local prejudices?\n The final phase of the project turns to a detailed case study. We apply lessons learned and frameworks developed in earlier phases to study a major issue at the intersection of philosophy of language and epistemology. Many epistemologist are proposing to adopt what has been called the 'New Linguistic Turn' (NLT) according to which the semantics for epistemically central concepts like 'knowledge', 'justification' and 'rationality' are based on appeals to intuitions about what speakers would say in various epistemic settings. Our goal will be to evaluate this proposal in the light of what has been learned about philosophical methodology in the first three phases. \n\n\n

  • Project . 2008 - 2009
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/G009635/1
    Funder Contribution: 16,483 GBP
    Partners: LSBU, Stour Valley Arts

    Superkingdom is the third part of 'Hibernator', a trilogy of works connecting myth and science, environmental cues and technological control, the virtual worlds we imagine and the real world we cannot escape. \n\nThe Superkingdom proposal draws on the natural woodland environment of King's Wood, Kent to inspire a series of animal 'Show Homes' that will provide a platform to observe and study animal behaviour over the winter months.\n\nConsidered as an enclave, a protected area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, King's Wood is an environment surrounded by encroaching urban development. This contention will provide the context for research into the changing habitat and consequent animal displacement and migration within the region of King's Wood. The fellow will develop a narrative of urban-rural / animal-human intersection. \n\nThe fellow will research the architecture of animals in particular their achievements in structural form and strength, use of locally resourced materials, ventilation and pest management. These methods will be contrasted to the architecture created by humankind.\n\nThis research will inform the design of a series of 'Show Homes' to encourage animals to take up residence. The 'Show Homes' will reflect human authoritarian architecture, fantastical architecture and the architecture created by animals. The structures will correspond with different sites of habitation - the canopy, floor and underground spaces of the forest. \n\nDrawing on existing research into the patterns of animals that hibernate, migrate or forage all winter, the forest installation will become a site for the study of animal habitation and behaviour. This study will provide content for a digital moving image work that will reflect the winter ecology of the forest. In contrast there will be a fictional element to the film to suggest changing environmental cues through an influx of non-native species taking up residence.\n\nThe 'Show Homes' will be filmed in situ with footage of both their external and internal spaces. The film will combine fictional utopias, dystopias, and dream worlds with architectural follies and notions of the 'new town'. \n\nTo further express ideas of displacement and non-locality, the fellow will collaborate with New Zealand based composer Dugal McKinnon who will develop a sound track for the moving image work, using sound recordings from forests in New Zealand, juxtaposing sound and image both geographically and seasonally.\n\n\n\n

Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.