Advanced search in
Projects
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
1,387 Projects

  • 2021-2021
  • European Commission
  • OA Publications Mandate: Yes
  • 2019
  • 2021

10
arrow_drop_down
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 795641
    Overall Budget: 180,277 EURFunder Contribution: 180,277 EUR

    Alpine Community Economies Lab (ACElab) uses participatory design methods to support alpine communities in addressing cross-cutting concerns of sustainable socio-economic development outlined in the EU Strategy for the Alpine Region and the Alpine Convention. Via a gender-sensitive community-based research space, I will engage a diversity of civic actors and policy makers in the collaborative investigation of (trans)local economies (e.g. forestry, tourism, crafts) sustaining their valley district. Together we will envision developments that have both people and the environment at their core. To do so, I mobilise my expertise in design-led civic participation and feminist economic geography and my Host and Secondment institutions’ expertise in regional development and participatory governance. Together we will prototype, test and refine a multifaceted community economies toolkit to be released via open-access. ACElab will enhance my expertise in leading participatory research projects with a gender-sensitive approach that work across the public and private sector. Through collaborations with the Host, the Secondment institution and the partnering policy makers (from local to European level), I will gain significant skills in research governance, public engagement and impact creation. I will gain expertise on alpine regional development and build research networks for follow-on grants. Thus, the fellowship will support my intended career of leading a participatory research lab in the alpine region. Beyond myself, ACElab offers significant value in the context of Horizon 2020 by addressing areas of special focus (e.g. economic growth & innovation, inclusive & reflective societies) and key objectives (e.g. build an effective research and innovation system, increase the economic potential of strategic areas) in collaboration with policy makers. Its value is significant for the Host as it premiers a community-based research lab and working with design-led methods.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 846170
    Overall Budget: 191,149 EURFunder Contribution: 191,149 EUR

    The design of enzymatic catalysts and protein therapeutics with tailored, new-to-nature properties is a long-standing goal in enzymology and cell biology. Nature generally uses 20 amino acids as building blocks for protein synthesis. However, this portfolio limits the options for engineering proteins with ‘un-natural’ activities. Recent developments in the expansion of the genetic code have the potential to revolutionise the design of novel enzymes; by reprogramming the genetic code, we could convey novel functionality into proteins and extend their properties. This project aims at incorporating thiazolium amino acids into the active site of a promiscuous and highly evolvable de novo enzyme, namely the RA95 (retro)-aldolase, for orchestrating organocatalytic transformations of clinical and industrial interest. Such reactions, conventionally mediated by non-enzymatic, small molecule N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysts require high temperature and catalyst loading. An engineered enzyme with the ability to catalyse such chemistry may overcome the drawbacks of these abiological catalysts, serving as a ‘greener’ biocatalytic alternative, and also perform the desired reactions in cells for medicinal purposes. This initiative will pave the way for development of general strategies for creating enzymes with unique properties and provide a tool-box for efficient, environmentally-friendly and bioorthogonal organocatalysed reactions. It is anticipated that the generated artificial biocatalysts will have attractive applications in research, medicine and industry.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 831998
    Overall Budget: 560,982 EURFunder Contribution: 498,451 EUR

    FluidER project aims to deliver fully integrated and autonomous sensor for in-line sensing and diagnosis of aviation hydraulic fluids (HF) used in electro Hydraulic Actuators (EHA). The proposed diagnosis approach is based on the combination of hydraulic fluid physic-chemic parameter sensors and fluid contamination sensors and, with the aim of achieving an early warning of degradation signs, especially in terms of particulate count and water contamination, before the hydraulic fluids exceeds the service limits. The combination of a set of heterogeneous sensor technologies is motivated by the lack of accuracy achieved by single devices, especially when dealing with multi-source contaminations and when an early identification of degradation evidences is targeted. FluidER proposal merges two types of approaches: (i) Sensors delivering measurements of physical and chemical parameters of the Hydraulic Fluid as the Viscosity, Density, Moisture, Dielectric Constant, Colour or Temperature, and (ii) sensors specifically designed to monitorize different contamination sources as the particulate matter concentration, presence of air or water. Specifically, FluidER will address the analysis of physical contaminants (metallic and non-metallic particulate count, air bubbles, etc.) through in-line microscopic imaging and machine vision proprietary techniques. Additionally, chemical contaminants (water content, acidity) will be estimated through VIS-IR spectroscopic inspection and chemometric algorithms. The information obtained from the different sensors will be used to generate a Diagnosis of the status of both, the fluid itself and the EHA equipment, through new health monitoring algorithms. The different hardware and software components included in the FluidER solution will be gradually tested in different test beds, ranging from controlled laboratory hydraulic test beds to a complete EHA test bed and different standardized aircraft tests.

    visibility45
    visibilityviews45
    downloaddownloads34
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 799801
    Overall Budget: 173,858 EURFunder Contribution: 173,857 EUR

    The global transition towards clean energy requires new ways to generate electricity. One promising approach are organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. These devices are based on a phase-separated network of two organic materials and hold the potential to make solar power cheap and sustainable. However, there is still a lack of fundamental understanding in key areas. One important open question concerns the charge recombination. Although identified as main loss mechanism in BHJ solar cells, its underlying principles remain mysterious. ReMorphOPV comes to address these limitations by developing a new recombination model. The basic hypothesis is that a successful theoretical description must properly consider two key features of a BHJ blend: the complex nanoscale morphology and the dispersive type of charge transport. To account for both aspects, ReMorphOPV will make use of extensive kinetic Monte Carlo simulations with high spatial and temporal resolution. The proposed numerical approach includes most realistic assumptions on the nanostructure (domain size, phase purity, molecular miscibility etc.) and previously overlooked phenomena of charge transport, namely the non-equilibrium and long-range motion of carriers. The predictions of the simulations will be validated by experiments on different prototype material systems. A feedback loop between experiment and numerical model will be initialised to refine the theoretical description and define new parameterisations of the recombination rate that enable easy dissemination to other researchers. With such a model at hand, it will be possible to find design rules for organic solar cells with minimised recombination losses even at large thickness. These results are of great relevance for the photovoltaics community and will help to reinforce Europe's world-leading position in renewable energies.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 862580
    Funder Contribution: 150,000 EUR

    Predicting clinical response to novel and existing anticancer drugs remains a major hurdle for successful cancer treatment. Studies indicate that the tumor ecosystem, resembling an organ-like structure, can limit the predictive power of current therapies that were evaluated solely on tumor cells. The interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment are required to promote tumor progression and metastasis, determining drug responsiveness. Such interactions do not form in standard research techniques, where cancer cells grow on 2D plastic dishes. Hence, there is a need to develop new cancer models that better mimic the physio-pathological conditions of tumors. Here, we create 3D-bioprinted tumor models based on a library of hydrogels we developed as scaffold for different tumor types, designed according to the mechanical properties of the tissue of origin. As PoC, we bioprinted a vascularized 3D brain tumor model from brain tumor cells co-cultured with stromal cells and mixed with our hydrogels, that resemble the biophysics of the tumor and its microenvironment. Our patient-derived models consist of cells from a biopsy, constructed according to CT/MRI scans, and include functional vessels allowing for patients' serum to flow when connected to a pump. These models will facilitate reproducible, reliable and rapid results, determining which treatment suits best the specific patient's tumor. Taken together, this 3D-printed model could be the basis for potentially replacing cell and animal models. We predict that this powerful platform will be used in translational research for preclinical evaluation of new therapies and for clinical drug screening, which will save critical time, reduce toxicity and significantly decrease costs generating a major societal benefit. Our platform offers a highly attractive business case, as pharmaceutical and biotech companies heavily invest in preclinical predictive tools for novel personalized drug screening strategies.

    visibility50
    visibilityviews50
    downloaddownloads30
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 799477
    Overall Budget: 173,857 EURFunder Contribution: 173,857 EUR

    Europe’s 2030 climate targets make the development of renewable energies a key challenge for researchers across many fields. Thermoelectric generators (TEG) are an emerging technology that promises conversion of the huge amount of waste heat into useful electricity. However, despite big research efforts, they remain niche applications. The reasons are low efficiencies, high costs and scarcity and toxicity of suitable inorganic materials. There is a recent and growing interest in organic-inorganic hybrid TEG. The idea is to combine the advantages of an organic semiconductor (low thermal conductivity, high thermopower) with those of an inorganic nanostructure (high electrical conductivity) by forming a blend of both. Exciting results have very recently been obtained with hybrid materials far outperforming the isolated constituents. This is also a remarkable achievement, given the multi-dimensional parameter space and the absence of a formal framework, forcing progress to be made by mostly heuristic approaches. HyThermEL aims to develop the first predictive, quantitative model for the performance of hybrid thermoelectric systems. By explicitly accounting for morphology, energetics, interfacial effects and the different transport mechanisms of the constituents, the outcome will be physics-based design rules. In a continuous feedback between experiment and theory, these will be employed to fabricate improved hybrid thermoelectric devices while refining the model. The field of hybrid thermodynamics is still in an initial state, so improved fundamental understanding and practical design rules are expected to have great impact on the community. In particular, we are convinced that current hybrid TEG are still far from their upper performance limits and that this project will open new avenues towards competitive TEG.

    visibility35
    visibilityviews35
    downloaddownloads83
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 846476
    Overall Budget: 162,806 EURFunder Contribution: 162,806 EUR

    Mycobacterium abscessus (Mab) is an opportunistic-multidrug-resistant non-tuberculous mycobacteria responsible for multiple clinically-acquired infections both pulmonary and extrapulmonary. Unlike many rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM), Mab is able to survive and multiply within macrophages, similar to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM) such as M. tuberculosis (Mtb). In Mtb, five T7SS (ESX-1-5) have been identified and shown to be essential for intracellular survival (ESX-1), virulence (ESX-1 and ESX-5) or growth (ESX-3). T7SS are composed of five protein components essential for function: EccB, EccC, EccD, EccE and MycP. Except for a low-resolution structure of the holo ESX-5 complex from the host lab at 13 Å resolution, no structural data on any T7SS have been published to date, rendering structural work timely and eagerly awaited by relevant communities. Deemed inactive due to its lack of one of the established T7SS components EccE4, ESX-4 has been considered an ancestral T7SS form. However, Mab possess a fully intact and functional ESX-4, essential for its intracellular survival, rendering it a highly attractive target for an in-depth characterization. Here, I propose an interdisciplinary project that includes both functional and structural investigation. As the 2 M Dalton-holo-complex crosses the Mab inner membrane, experimental structural work will be challenging and require an integrative modeling approach to combine diverse experimental data sets. Complementary infection biology experiments including microbiology, genetics and cell biology will be carried out by collaborators. With this work, I aim to respond to central questions related to T7SS in general and Mab ESX-4 specifically, such as: what is the mechanism of T7SS-mediated secretion? What makes ESX-4 specific and different from other T7SS? What is the specific role of EccE4 to establish a functionally active ESX4? and What are the substrates and specific mechanism of ESX-4 substrate recognition?

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 845122
    Overall Budget: 219,312 EURFunder Contribution: 219,312 EUR

    The research proposal addresses the challenges of optimum architecture, power production and operation for distributed renewable energy systems with storage. The proposal explores the efficient arrangement of decentralized power plants using photovoltaic panels and battery storage for a long-term increase of renewable generation. The critical issues such are the increased energy yield, minimization of cost of energy and availability will be addressed. A detailed techno-economic analysis will be performed to identify the cost effective superior distributed architecture suitable for integrated photovoltaic and battery systems. Multi-objective optimization study and validation will be performed that ensures actual optimization of energy production in the integrated environment. An integrated diagnostic method will be developed for real-time performance monitoring to improve the availability of the complex integrated energy system. Two secondment partners are identified to obtain necessary data and expertise in the field of research. The action will result in identifying an optimum solution in terms of control, operation and availability, especially for local renewable energy generation and storage. Novel algorithms for optimization for the operation and control of the modular energy sources with storage will be proposed. A real-time monitoring and diagnostic algorithm for performance monitoring, early failure detection and aging of integrated PV and battery solution will be developed. The research will provide newer insights on optimized power flow and control operation in complex interconnected distributed renewable energy sources considering the storage. Besides the technological significance and scientific value, the proposed research project is opportune and timely placed within the EU renewable energy directive and focuses on the core issue in line with the aims of EU energy research projects.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 845570
    Overall Budget: 172,932 EURFunder Contribution: 172,932 EUR

    European adults are in dire need of increasing their physical activity (PA) levels. Leading an active lifestyle helps to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and improve mental health and cognitive function. The WHO estimates that physical inactivity is responsible for more than one million premature deaths/year in the European region alone, as 40% of European adults fail to reach PA recommendations. Living in obesogenic environments is one culprit for the lack of PA and one that has been extensively studied by environmental epidemiologists. A second cause of physical inactivity, is lack of time, but despite being frequently cited in studies and surveys, time use and time pressure have been seldom addressed in relation with the built environment. PA campaigns can be easily spoiled if people have no time available to invest in exercising. And in our contemporary societies, time availability is also deeply rooted on the built environment and the characteristics of our activity spaces. Factors such as how long our commute is, or whether one can connect home-work-school with public transit are going to affect both how much time we have left, and how much PA do we gain from active transport. This project aims at addressing this glaring gap in the literature, by incorporating time availability and time perceptions to the study of the associations between PA and the built environment. It does so by recruiting 150 employed adults (50% women; 33% with children) in the Metropolitan Region of Barcelona and tracking their PA patterns during a week, using a GPS and accelerometer devices. Time availability is assessed using daily EMA surveys aimed at describing their subjective use of time in relation with their physical activity. By triangulating GPS, accelerometer, GIS and EMA measures this project will build informed activity spaces that will allow to examine the associations between the environment and PA through the new lens of time availability.

    visibility101
    visibilityviews101
    downloaddownloads154
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 844837
    Overall Budget: 171,473 EURFunder Contribution: 171,473 EUR

    When transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are thinned down to monolayer thickness, they exhibit a direct bang gap at the K and K’ points of the Brillouin zone, which represents a binary quantum degree of freedom, referred to as valley pseudospin. The fabrication of high quality samples is currently based on the mechanical exfoliation of monolayer flakes from bulk crystal. While this approach gives excellent results at the laboratory scale, it lacks potential for upscaling, in particular if one wants to achieve a systematic coupling with surrounding photonic structures. This drawback can be overcome by controllably creating single-layer thick domes by performing hydrogen irradiation of a multilayer TMD sample. SELENe aims at exploiting this fabrication approach to perform a paradigm-shifting experimental activity, which merges the investigation of so far unexplored fundamental electronic properties of TMDs, and the first implementation of a practical interface between TMD-based emitters and basic photonic structures. We will perform a systematic investigation of the optical properties of monolayer-thick domes formed after H irradiation and extend this by controllably applying strain via piezoelectric actuators to H-inflated domes. We will investigate the influence of the strain also on interlayer excitons formed across van der Waals heterostructures. We will achieve control of the emission intensity of the interlayer exciton in domes formed in heterobilayers, because the interlayer distance can be varied acting on the temperature, due to the condensation of H2 trapped into the dome. Finally, it is possible to selectively expose prescribed regions of a sample to H irradiation by defining openings in H-opaque masks. We will take advantage of this approach by making use of electron-beam lithography to fabricate nanometer-sized domes, which we will then exploit as site-controlled emitters and for coupling into waveguides and photonic crystal cavities.

    more_vert
Advanced search in
Projects
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
1,387 Projects
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 795641
    Overall Budget: 180,277 EURFunder Contribution: 180,277 EUR

    Alpine Community Economies Lab (ACElab) uses participatory design methods to support alpine communities in addressing cross-cutting concerns of sustainable socio-economic development outlined in the EU Strategy for the Alpine Region and the Alpine Convention. Via a gender-sensitive community-based research space, I will engage a diversity of civic actors and policy makers in the collaborative investigation of (trans)local economies (e.g. forestry, tourism, crafts) sustaining their valley district. Together we will envision developments that have both people and the environment at their core. To do so, I mobilise my expertise in design-led civic participation and feminist economic geography and my Host and Secondment institutions’ expertise in regional development and participatory governance. Together we will prototype, test and refine a multifaceted community economies toolkit to be released via open-access. ACElab will enhance my expertise in leading participatory research projects with a gender-sensitive approach that work across the public and private sector. Through collaborations with the Host, the Secondment institution and the partnering policy makers (from local to European level), I will gain significant skills in research governance, public engagement and impact creation. I will gain expertise on alpine regional development and build research networks for follow-on grants. Thus, the fellowship will support my intended career of leading a participatory research lab in the alpine region. Beyond myself, ACElab offers significant value in the context of Horizon 2020 by addressing areas of special focus (e.g. economic growth & innovation, inclusive & reflective societies) and key objectives (e.g. build an effective research and innovation system, increase the economic potential of strategic areas) in collaboration with policy makers. Its value is significant for the Host as it premiers a community-based research lab and working with design-led methods.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 846170
    Overall Budget: 191,149 EURFunder Contribution: 191,149 EUR

    The design of enzymatic catalysts and protein therapeutics with tailored, new-to-nature properties is a long-standing goal in enzymology and cell biology. Nature generally uses 20 amino acids as building blocks for protein synthesis. However, this portfolio limits the options for engineering proteins with ‘un-natural’ activities. Recent developments in the expansion of the genetic code have the potential to revolutionise the design of novel enzymes; by reprogramming the genetic code, we could convey novel functionality into proteins and extend their properties. This project aims at incorporating thiazolium amino acids into the active site of a promiscuous and highly evolvable de novo enzyme, namely the RA95 (retro)-aldolase, for orchestrating organocatalytic transformations of clinical and industrial interest. Such reactions, conventionally mediated by non-enzymatic, small molecule N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysts require high temperature and catalyst loading. An engineered enzyme with the ability to catalyse such chemistry may overcome the drawbacks of these abiological catalysts, serving as a ‘greener’ biocatalytic alternative, and also perform the desired reactions in cells for medicinal purposes. This initiative will pave the way for development of general strategies for creating enzymes with unique properties and provide a tool-box for efficient, environmentally-friendly and bioorthogonal organocatalysed reactions. It is anticipated that the generated artificial biocatalysts will have attractive applications in research, medicine and industry.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 831998
    Overall Budget: 560,982 EURFunder Contribution: 498,451 EUR

    FluidER project aims to deliver fully integrated and autonomous sensor for in-line sensing and diagnosis of aviation hydraulic fluids (HF) used in electro Hydraulic Actuators (EHA). The proposed diagnosis approach is based on the combination of hydraulic fluid physic-chemic parameter sensors and fluid contamination sensors and, with the aim of achieving an early warning of degradation signs, especially in terms of particulate count and water contamination, before the hydraulic fluids exceeds the service limits. The combination of a set of heterogeneous sensor technologies is motivated by the lack of accuracy achieved by single devices, especially when dealing with multi-source contaminations and when an early identification of degradation evidences is targeted. FluidER proposal merges two types of approaches: (i) Sensors delivering measurements of physical and chemical parameters of the Hydraulic Fluid as the Viscosity, Density, Moisture, Dielectric Constant, Colour or Temperature, and (ii) sensors specifically designed to monitorize different contamination sources as the particulate matter concentration, presence of air or water. Specifically, FluidER will address the analysis of physical contaminants (metallic and non-metallic particulate count, air bubbles, etc.) through in-line microscopic imaging and machine vision proprietary techniques. Additionally, chemical contaminants (water content, acidity) will be estimated through VIS-IR spectroscopic inspection and chemometric algorithms. The information obtained from the different sensors will be used to generate a Diagnosis of the status of both, the fluid itself and the EHA equipment, through new health monitoring algorithms. The different hardware and software components included in the FluidER solution will be gradually tested in different test beds, ranging from controlled laboratory hydraulic test beds to a complete EHA test bed and different standardized aircraft tests.

    visibility45
    visibilityviews45
    downloaddownloads34
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 799801
    Overall Budget: 173,858 EURFunder Contribution: 173,857 EUR

    The global transition towards clean energy requires new ways to generate electricity. One promising approach are organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. These devices are based on a phase-separated network of two organic materials and hold the potential to make solar power cheap and sustainable. However, there is still a lack of fundamental understanding in key areas. One important open question concerns the charge recombination. Although identified as main loss mechanism in BHJ solar cells, its underlying principles remain mysterious. ReMorphOPV comes to address these limitations by developing a new recombination model. The basic hypothesis is that a successful theoretical description must properly consider two key features of a BHJ blend: the complex nanoscale morphology and the dispersive type of charge transport. To account for both aspects, ReMorphOPV will make use of extensive kinetic Monte Carlo simulations with high spatial and temporal resolution. The proposed numerical approach includes most realistic assumptions on the nanostructure (domain size, phase purity, molecular miscibility etc.) and previously overlooked phenomena of charge transport, namely the non-equilibrium and long-range motion of carriers. The predictions of the simulations will be validated by experiments on different prototype material systems. A feedback loop between experiment and numerical model will be initialised to refine the theoretical description and define new parameterisations of the recombination rate that enable easy dissemination to other researchers. With such a model at hand, it will be possible to find design rules for organic solar cells with minimised recombination losses even at large thickness. These results are of great relevance for the photovoltaics community and will help to reinforce Europe's world-leading position in renewable energies.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 862580
    Funder Contribution: 150,000 EUR

    Predicting clinical response to novel and existing anticancer drugs remains a major hurdle for successful cancer treatment. Studies indicate that the tumor ecosystem, resembling an organ-like structure, can limit the predictive power of current therapies that were evaluated solely on tumor cells. The interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment are required to promote tumor progression and metastasis, determining drug responsiveness. Such interactions do not form in standard research techniques, where cancer cells grow on 2D plastic dishes. Hence, there is a need to develop new cancer models that better mimic the physio-pathological conditions of tumors. Here, we create 3D-bioprinted tumor models based on a library of hydrogels we developed as scaffold for different tumor types, designed according to the mechanical properties of the tissue of origin. As PoC, we bioprinted a vascularized 3D brain tumor model from brain tumor cells co-cultured with stromal cells and mixed with our hydrogels, that resemble the biophysics of the tumor and its microenvironment. Our patient-derived models consist of cells from a biopsy, constructed according to CT/MRI scans, and include functional vessels allowing for patients' serum to flow when connected to a pump. These models will facilitate reproducible, reliable and rapid results, determining which treatment suits best the specific patient's tumor. Taken together, this 3D-printed model could be the basis for potentially replacing cell and animal models. We predict that this powerful platform will be used in translational research for preclinical evaluation of new therapies and for clinical drug screening, which will save critical time, reduce toxicity and significantly decrease costs generating a major societal benefit. Our platform offers a highly attractive business case, as pharmaceutical and biotech companies heavily invest in preclinical predictive tools for novel personalized drug screening strategies.

    visibility50
    visibilityviews50
    downloaddownloads30
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 799477
    Overall Budget: 173,857 EURFunder Contribution: 173,857 EUR

    Europe’s 2030 climate targets make the development of renewable energies a key challenge for researchers across many fields. Thermoelectric generators (TEG) are an emerging technology that promises conversion of the huge amount of waste heat into useful electricity. However, despite big research efforts, they remain niche applications. The reasons are low efficiencies, high costs and scarcity and toxicity of suitable inorganic materials. There is a recent and growing interest in organic-inorganic hybrid TEG. The idea is to combine the advantages of an organic semiconductor (low thermal conductivity, high thermopower) with those of an inorganic nanostructure (high electrical conductivity) by forming a blend of both. Exciting results have very recently been obtained with hybrid materials far outperforming the isolated constituents. This is also a remarkable achievement, given the multi-dimensional parameter space and the absence of a formal framework, forcing progress to be made by mostly heuristic approaches. HyThermEL aims to develop the first predictive, quantitative model for the performance of hybrid thermoelectric systems. By explicitly accounting for morphology, energetics, interfacial effects and the different transport mechanisms of the constituents, the outcome will be physics-based design rules. In a continuous feedback between experiment and theory, these will be employed to fabricate improved hybrid thermoelectric devices while refining the model. The field of hybrid thermodynamics is still in an initial state, so improved fundamental understanding and practical design rules are expected to have great impact on the community. In particular, we are convinced that current hybrid TEG are still far from their upper performance limits and that this project will open new avenues towards competitive TEG.

    visibility35
    visibilityviews35
    downloaddownloads83
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 846476
    Overall Budget: 162,806 EURFunder Contribution: 162,806 EUR

    Mycobacterium abscessus (Mab) is an opportunistic-multidrug-resistant non-tuberculous mycobacteria responsible for multiple clinically-acquired infections both pulmonary and extrapulmonary. Unlike many rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM), Mab is able to survive and multiply within macrophages, similar to slow growing mycobacteria (SGM) such as M. tuberculosis (Mtb). In Mtb, five T7SS (ESX-1-5) have been identified and shown to be essential for intracellular survival (ESX-1), virulence (ESX-1 and ESX-5) or growth (ESX-3). T7SS are composed of five protein components essential for function: EccB, EccC, EccD, EccE and MycP. Except for a low-resolution structure of the holo ESX-5 complex from the host lab at 13 Å resolution, no structural data on any T7SS have been published to date, rendering structural work timely and eagerly awaited by relevant communities. Deemed inactive due to its lack of one of the established T7SS components EccE4, ESX-4 has been considered an ancestral T7SS form. However, Mab possess a fully intact and functional ESX-4, essential for its intracellular survival, rendering it a highly attractive target for an in-depth characterization. Here, I propose an interdisciplinary project that includes both functional and structural investigation. As the 2 M Dalton-holo-complex crosses the Mab inner membrane, experimental structural work will be challenging and require an integrative modeling approach to combine diverse experimental data sets. Complementary infection biology experiments including microbiology, genetics and cell biology will be carried out by collaborators. With this work, I aim to respond to central questions related to T7SS in general and Mab ESX-4 specifically, such as: what is the mechanism of T7SS-mediated secretion? What makes ESX-4 specific and different from other T7SS? What is the specific role of EccE4 to establish a functionally active ESX4? and What are the substrates and specific mechanism of ESX-4 substrate recognition?

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 845122
    Overall Budget: 219,312 EURFunder Contribution: 219,312 EUR

    The research proposal addresses the challenges of optimum architecture, power production and operation for distributed renewable energy systems with storage. The proposal explores the efficient arrangement of decentralized power plants using photovoltaic panels and battery storage for a long-term increase of renewable generation. The critical issues such are the increased energy yield, minimization of cost of energy and availability will be addressed. A detailed techno-economic analysis will be performed to identify the cost effective superior distributed architecture suitable for integrated photovoltaic and battery systems. Multi-objective optimization study and validation will be performed that ensures actual optimization of energy production in the integrated environment. An integrated diagnostic method will be developed for real-time performance monitoring to improve the availability of the complex integrated energy system. Two secondment partners are identified to obtain necessary data and expertise in the field of research. The action will result in identifying an optimum solution in terms of control, operation and availability, especially for local renewable energy generation and storage. Novel algorithms for optimization for the operation and control of the modular energy sources with storage will be proposed. A real-time monitoring and diagnostic algorithm for performance monitoring, early failure detection and aging of integrated PV and battery solution will be developed. The research will provide newer insights on optimized power flow and control operation in complex interconnected distributed renewable energy sources considering the storage. Besides the technological significance and scientific value, the proposed research project is opportune and timely placed within the EU renewable energy directive and focuses on the core issue in line with the aims of EU energy research projects.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 845570
    Overall Budget: 172,932 EURFunder Contribution: 172,932 EUR

    European adults are in dire need of increasing their physical activity (PA) levels. Leading an active lifestyle helps to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and improve mental health and cognitive function. The WHO estimates that physical inactivity is responsible for more than one million premature deaths/year in the European region alone, as 40% of European adults fail to reach PA recommendations. Living in obesogenic environments is one culprit for the lack of PA and one that has been extensively studied by environmental epidemiologists. A second cause of physical inactivity, is lack of time, but despite being frequently cited in studies and surveys, time use and time pressure have been seldom addressed in relation with the built environment. PA campaigns can be easily spoiled if people have no time available to invest in exercising. And in our contemporary societies, time availability is also deeply rooted on the built environment and the characteristics of our activity spaces. Factors such as how long our commute is, or whether one can connect home-work-school with public transit are going to affect both how much time we have left, and how much PA do we gain from active transport. This project aims at addressing this glaring gap in the literature, by incorporating time availability and time perceptions to the study of the associations between PA and the built environment. It does so by recruiting 150 employed adults (50% women; 33% with children) in the Metropolitan Region of Barcelona and tracking their PA patterns during a week, using a GPS and accelerometer devices. Time availability is assessed using daily EMA surveys aimed at describing their subjective use of time in relation with their physical activity. By triangulating GPS, accelerometer, GIS and EMA measures this project will build informed activity spaces that will allow to examine the associations between the environment and PA through the new lens of time availability.

    visibility101
    visibilityviews101
    downloaddownloads154
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 844837
    Overall Budget: 171,473 EURFunder Contribution: 171,473 EUR

    When transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are thinned down to monolayer thickness, they exhibit a direct bang gap at the K and K’ points of the Brillouin zone, which represents a binary quantum degree of freedom, referred to as valley pseudospin. The fabrication of high quality samples is currently based on the mechanical exfoliation of monolayer flakes from bulk crystal. While this approach gives excellent results at the laboratory scale, it lacks potential for upscaling, in particular if one wants to achieve a systematic coupling with surrounding photonic structures. This drawback can be overcome by controllably creating single-layer thick domes by performing hydrogen irradiation of a multilayer TMD sample. SELENe aims at exploiting this fabrication approach to perform a paradigm-shifting experimental activity, which merges the investigation of so far unexplored fundamental electronic properties of TMDs, and the first implementation of a practical interface between TMD-based emitters and basic photonic structures. We will perform a systematic investigation of the optical properties of monolayer-thick domes formed after H irradiation and extend this by controllably applying strain via piezoelectric actuators to H-inflated domes. We will investigate the influence of the strain also on interlayer excitons formed across van der Waals heterostructures. We will achieve control of the emission intensity of the interlayer exciton in domes formed in heterobilayers, because the interlayer distance can be varied acting on the temperature, due to the condensation of H2 trapped into the dome. Finally, it is possible to selectively expose prescribed regions of a sample to H irradiation by defining openings in H-opaque masks. We will take advantage of this approach by making use of electron-beam lithography to fabricate nanometer-sized domes, which we will then exploit as site-controlled emitters and for coupling into waveguides and photonic crystal cavities.

    more_vert